Undergraduate GE Tracks

This page provides suggested General Education (GE) Tracks for undergraduate students to consider as they work to meet the Undergraduate Requirements for B.S. Degrees–as detailed in the Samueli School of Engineering announcement.

  • GE Tracks allow students to meet some of their GE requirements by taking a specified set of related courses (typically three to five) to explore a topic or theme of interest in greater depth. Students should consider the GE Tracks presented here as an opportunity to meet this degree requirement through a coherent and more meaningful set of learning experiences.
  • The GE Tracks broaden the engineering student’s interdisciplinary knowledge and perspective, enhancing their analytical and collaborative skills and ability to consider social impacts and the ethical consequences of engineering research and its applications in the world. Students may also choose to explore a particular liberal arts field, such as Classics, delve into Environmental Science,  or any other topic of interest, available in the current GE Tracks. In this way, GE Tracks encourage personal growth and help students better prepare for their professional careers.

Be sure to check back to find new GE tracks being offered. 

Before exploring the GE Tracks, it serves an engineering undergrad well to fully understand the engineering GE requirements outlined on the Undergraduate  Requirements for the BS Degrees page (scroll down to “General Education”)

CLASSICS – This track acquaints you with the study of ancient Greece and Rome and their political, social, artistic, and intellectual legacy. The area of inquiry spans more than two thousand years, from the art and archaeology of the Mediterranean Bronze Age (ca. 1700 B.C.E.) to the breakdown of the Roman empire in Late Antiquity (ca. 400 C.E.). The interdisciplinary nature of the track offers its students a broad range of courses in the fields of language, literature, religion, mythology, philosophy, political history, cultural studies, digital humanities, virtual reality, archaeology, art, and film. The Classics GE track offers a unique perspective on relations between the past and the present and cultivates both breadth of knowledge and precision in writing and thinking. This track is an ideal complement to an Engineering education. It should be of particular interest to students who are intellectually curious and who wish to receive an expansive and exciting introduction to humanistic inquiry.

Arts and Humanities - Literary and Cultural Analysis (12 Courses)

CLASSIC 10 – Discovering the Greeks. Knowledge of Greek not required. Study of Greek life and culture from age of Homer to Roman conquest. Readings focus on selections from works of ancient authors in translation. Lectures illustrated with images of art, architecture, and material culture. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

CLASSIC 20 – Discovering the Romans. Knowledge of Latin not required. Study of Roman life and culture from time of city’s legendary foundations to end of classical antiquity. Readings focus on selections from works of ancient authors in translation. Lectures illustrated with images of art, architecture, and material culture. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

CLASSIC 30 – Classical Mythology. Introduction to myths and legends of ancient Greece and/or Rome, role of those stories in their societies, and modern approaches to studying them. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

CLASSIC 40W – Reading Greek Literature: Writing-Intensive. Requisite: English Composition 3. Exploration in detail and from variety of critical perspectives of carefully selected literary texts characteristic of ancient Greece and significant in Western literary tradition. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

CLASSIC 41W – Reading Roman Literature: Writing-Intensive. Requisite: English Composition 3. Exploration in detail and from variety of critical perspectives of carefully selected set of literary texts characteristic of ancient Rome and significant in Western literary tradition. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

CLASSIC 42 – Cinema and Ancient World. Use of popular culture and cinema to introduce students to ancient Greek and/or Roman culture; focus at discretion of instructor. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

CLASSIC 48 – Ancient Greek and Roman Medicine. Introduction to Greek and Roman medicine in its intellectual and cultural context. Examination of construction of concepts such as health, disease, physician, man, woman, cause, and difference. Readings from Greek literature and healing in cult of Asclepius. Readings of texts from Hippocratic collection, thought to be close to practice and theory of 5th-century BCE Greek physician, relating them to medical practice, competition for students and patients, intellectual display, developing scientific methods, ethnography, and Greek philosophy. Discussion of plagues as attempts to view such outbreaks as social phenomena. Examination of how Hippocratic understanding of how–or whether–we can know about what happens inside body was developed and challenged in 3rd-century BCE Alexandria. Study of Prince of Physicians, Galen, champion of Hippocratic medicine, influential into 18th century. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

CLASSIC 51A – Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece. Survey of major period, theme, or medium of Greek art and archaeology at discretion of instructor. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

CLASSIC 51B – Art and Archaeology of Ancient Rome. Survey of major period, theme, or medium of Roman art and archaeology at discretion of instructor. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

CLASSIC 60 – Fantastic Journey: Antiquity and Beyond. Investigation of phenomenon of fantastic or imaginary journey, from Homer’s “Odyssey” to Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey.” Examination of ways in which travel to strange or new worlds is presented through number of texts (and occasionally films) across different cultures and periods, with focus primarily on antiquity but also looking at how important motifs from ancient Greek and Roman travel narratives have endured to present day. Issues include cultural relativism, what makes space either familiar or alien, rebuilding of home in fantastic territories, methods of travel (both fantastic and mundane), methods of measuring time and distance across space, modern classifications of fantasy and science fiction, and to what extent these terms are applicable to ancient world. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

CLASSIC 88GE – General Education Seminar. Focused study of one aspect of ancient Greek or Roman culture or reception of classical tradition. Topics are interdisciplinary in nature (literature, arts, religion, politics, culture) and make connections between ancient and postclassical eras. Topics include rediscovery of Pompeii and Herculaneum; Roman religion and literature; pleasures of Greek or Roman body; and 18th-century British literature and reception of classics. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

CLASSIC 148 – Early Greek Medicine and Thought. Versions of medical theory and practice in context of Greek intellectual and cultural developments. Readings from medical, philosophical, and historical texts. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Arts and Humanities -Philosophical and Linguistic Analysis (2 Courses)

CLASSIC 148 – Early Greek Medicine and Thought. Versions of medical theory and practice in context of Greek intellectual and cultural developments. Readings from medical, philosophical, and historical texts. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

CLASSIC 185 – Origins and Nature of English Vocabulary. Origins and nature of English vocabulary, from Proto-Indo-European prehistory to current slang. Topics include Greek and Latin component in English (including technical terminology), alphabet and English spelling, semantic change and word formation, vocabulary in literature and film. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Arts and Humanities - Visual and Performing Arts Analysis (3 Courses)

CLASSIC 42 – Cinema and Ancient World. Use of popular culture and cinema to introduce students to ancient Greek and/or Roman culture; focus at discretion of instructor. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

CLASSIC 51A – Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece. Survey of major period, theme, or medium of Greek art and archaeology at discretion of instructor. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

CLASSIC 51B – Art and Archaeology of Ancient Rome. Survey of major period, theme, or medium of Roman art and archaeology at discretion of instructor. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Society and Culture - Historical Analysis (3 Courses)

CLASSIC 10 – Discovering the Greeks. Knowledge of Greek not required. Study of Greek life and culture from age of Homer to Roman conquest. Readings focus on selections from works of ancient authors in translation. Lectures illustrated with images of art, architecture, and material culture. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

CLASSIC 20 – Discovering the Romans. Knowledge of Latin not required. Study of Roman life and culture from time of city’s legendary foundations to end of classical antiquity. Readings focus on selections from works of ancient authors in translation. Lectures illustrated with images of art, architecture, and material culture. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

CLASSIC 48 – Ancient Greek and Roman Medicine. Introduction to Greek and Roman medicine in its intellectual and cultural context. Examination of construction of concepts such as health, disease, physician, man, woman, cause, and difference. Readings from Greek literature and healing in cult of Asclepius. Readings of texts from Hippocratic collection, thought to be close to practice and theory of 5th-century BCE Greek physician, relating them to medical practice, competition for students and patients, intellectual display, developing scientific methods, ethnography, and Greek philosophy. Discussion of plagues as attempts to view such outbreaks as social phenomena. Examination of how Hippocratic understanding of how–or whether–we can know about what happens inside body was developed and challenged in 3rd-century BCE Alexandria. Study of Prince of Physicians, Galen, champion of Hippocratic medicine, influential into 18th century. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Society and Culture - Social Analysis (1 Course)

CLASSIC 30 – Classical Mythology. Introduction to myths and legends of ancient Greece and/or Rome, role of those stories in their societies, and modern approaches to studying them. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Scientific Inquiry - Life Science (0 Courses)

No Courses for this subcategory in this track

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE URBAN RESILIENT SYSTEMS – This track will introduce the students to environmental resilience and recovery in an age of disturbances, such as increased population, urbanization, resource depletion, industrialization, and climate change. In urban settings, it is even more crucial that the natural and built environments support a healthy, productive, and sustainable society. Through the diverse and balanced course portfolio, the students will gain a comprehensive understanding of urban environmental issues as well as an integrated approach to keeping the planet safe for humanity

Arts and Humanities - Literary and Cultural Analysis (1 Course)

HNRS 44 – Society of Excess: On Waste, Consumer Culture, and Environment. Examination of waste in both real and virtual worlds, looking in interdisciplinary ways at various cultural representations of trash set against backdrop of society of excess and environment constantly threatened by overflowing and mismanaged waste, including social and cultural responses to physical waste and cyber battle against Internet debris. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Arts and Humanities -Philosophical and Linguistic Analysis (0 Courses)

No Courses for this subcategory in this Track

Arts and Humanities - Visual and Performing Arts Analysis (3 Courses)

DESMA 10 – Design Culture. Understanding design process, with emphasis on development of visual language; study of historic, scientific, technological, economic, and cultural factors influencing design in physical environment. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 24 – Architecture in Modern World. (Formerly numbered 58) Introduction to study of architectural history through examination of built world of past two centuries. Building technologies and forms of economic, social, and political life have produced modern built environment that is both diverse and increasingly connected. Focus on factors that have affected architecture globally and those that give regions, cultures, and historical periods their particular qualities. Topics include architectural and urban ramifications of modern self‐consciousness, nationalism and internationalism, industrialism, colonialism and anticolonialism, and new art and architectural theories. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ARCH & UD 30 – Introduction to Architectural Studies. Exploration of role of built environment in social, cultural, and political life: how buildings are constructed, what they mean, effects they have on world, and ways they imagine new futures and shape private and public life. Focus on series of contemporary case studies for what each reveals about new possibilities for shaping world in which we live, with emphasis on how architecture extends to cities, roads, books, and films. Consideration of historical context and cultural genealogy of particular buildings and environments, material and economic conditions of building, and more. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Society and Culture - Historical Analysis (4 Courses)

GEOG 4 – Globalization: Regional Development and World Economy. Economic geography explores spatial distribution of all forms of human productive activity at number of geographical scales‐‐local, regional, national, and global. Key theme is impact of increasingly powerful global economic forces on organization of production. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ARCH & UD 10A – History of Architecture and Urban Design: Prehistory to Mannerism. Exploration of developments in global architecture and urban design from prehistory to 1600 and critical reflection on terms such as building, architecture, city, history, and culture. Focus on world context, construction and technology, and history of architectural ideas. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ARCH & UD 10B – History of Architecture and Urban Design: Baroque to Contemporary Moment. Survey of architectural and urban history from 1600 to present in global context. Exploration of buildings, cities, spaces, artifacts, landscapes, and ideas through their relation to geopolitical conditions and through their relation to theories of design. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 24 – Architecture in Modern World. (Formerly numbered 58) Introduction to study of architectural history through examination of built world of past two centuries. Building technologies and forms of economic, social, and political life have produced modern built environment that is both diverse and increasingly connected. Focus on factors that have affected architecture globally and those that give regions, cultures, and historical periods their particular qualities. Topics include architectural and urban ramifications of modern self‐consciousness, nationalism and internationalism, industrialism, colonialism and anti-colonialism, and new art and architectural theories. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Society and Culture - Social Analysis (5 Courses)

GEOG 6 – World Regions: Concepts and Contemporary Issues. Interdisciplinary and historical approach to modern peoples, their differences in wealth or poverty, and their local origins of food production. Brief introduction to physical geography and biogeography of each region. Discussion of each region’s peoples, languages, foods, pre-histories, and histories. Credits: 5.0 Units.

PUB PLC 10D – Public Policy and Urban Homelessness. Application of policy analysis to issues and solutions concerning homelessness. Guest lectures from local policymakers. Credits: 5.0 Units.

DGT HUM 30 – Los Angeles Tech City: Digital Technologies and Spatial Justice. Lecture, two and one half hours; studio, two hours. Investigation of spatial justice and injustice in multi-ethnic city of Los Angeles through Lens of three thematic technologies that built and transformed Los Angeles into global metropolis: cars and highways, networking technologies culminating in Internet and World Wide Web, and film and broadcast media. Use of innovative forms of investigation and communication, from digital mapping to video-sensing, to integrate interpretative and historical approaches of humanities with material and projective practices of design. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

STATS 12 – Introduction to Statistical Methods for Geography and Environmental Studies. Introduction to statistical thinking and understanding, with emphasis on techniques used in geography and environmental science. Underlying logic behind statistical procedures, role of variation in statistical thinking, strengths and limitations of statistical summaries, and fundamental inferential tools. Emphasis on applications in geography and environmental science in laboratory work using professional statistical analysis package, including spatial statistics. Credits: 5.0 Units.

HNRS 41 – Understanding Ecology: Finding Interdisciplinary Solutions to Environmental Problems. Exploration of ecological basis of planet’s most important environmental issues, including global climate change, ocean acidification, biodiversity loss, deforestation, pollution, and declining freshwater resources and fisheries. Examination of both hard science and interdisciplinary solutions (social, political, educational) to environmental problems. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Scientific Inquiry - Life Science (6 Courses)

GEOG 5 – People and the Earth’s Ecosystems. Exploration of ways in which human activity impacts natural environment and how modification of environment can eventually have significant consequences for human activity. Examination, using case studies, of real environmental problems that confront us today. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ENVIRON 25 – Good Food for Everyone: Health, Sustainability, and Culture. Good food is healthy, sustainably produced, and culturally meaningful. Introduction to basic concepts and history of food systems, food science and nutrition, fair and sustainable food production, natural resources and environmental issues including climate change and biodiversity, agriculture and food policy and law, food distribution and access, cultural identity and artistic engagements with food. Credits: 5.0 Units.

HNRS 41 – Understanding Ecology: Finding Interdisciplinary Solutions to Environmental Problems. Exploration of ecological basis of planet’s most important environmental issues, including global climate change, ocean acidification, biodiversity loss, deforestation, pollution, and declining freshwater resources and fisheries. Examination of both hard science and interdisciplinary solutions (social, political, educational) to environmental problems. Credits: 5.0 Units.

EE BIOL 18 – Why Ecology Matters: Science Behind Environmental Issues. Basic ecological concepts, scientific method, and ecological basis for local and global environmental issues. Major challenges to be faced in this century, including need to find interdisciplinary and collaborative solutions to world’s worsening environmental problems (e.g., global climate change, biodiversity loss, deforestation, pollution, declining water resources, declining fisheries). Environmental literacy to equip students to become leaders in growing green economy and to help forge solutions to current and future environmental crises that threaten natural resource base. Credits: 5.0 Units.

GEOG 2 – Biogeography: Spatial Dynamics of Biogeography in a changing world. Biogeographic exploration of plant and animal diversity and conservation issues on continents and islands around world. Study of physical, biotic, and human factors responsible for evolution, persistence, and extinction of species and ecological communities. Analysis of effects of human activity. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ENV HLT 207 – Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. Designed for freshmen/sophomores. Introduction to fundamental principles and concepts necessary to carry out sound geographic analysis with geographic information systems (GIS). Reinforcement of key issues in GIS, such as geographic coordinate systems, map projections, spatial analysis, and visualization of spatial data. Laboratory exercises use database query, manipulation, and spatial analysis to address real‐world problems. Credits: 5.0 Units.

POPULAR MEDIA – This track is designed to give students the critical and analytical skills to understand and critique a wide array of popular media forms and modes of expression. Through a diverse general-elective portfolio that includes courses in games, film and television, music, design, interactive media, animation, and internet/web, this track helps students develop a solid foundation in media literacy and an understanding of popular media and its implications for culture and society.

Arts and Humanities - Literary and Cultural Analysis (7 Courses)

COMPARTIVE LITERATURE 1E – Social Media and Storytelling: Comparing Cultures. Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level  Writing requirement. Study of social media as platform for storytelling, with core focus on three  distinct cultures: U.S., China, and Russia. History, form, and various functions of social media. Examination of how we tell stories about ourselves and how we interpret digital narratives we see, hear, or read from organizations near and far. Analysis of networked narratives encountered online. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ENGLISH 91D – Introduction to Graphic Fiction. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Introduction to popularity and important cultural work of comic books and graphic novels. Emphasis on how text and image combine to create meaning, including problem of appropriateness of comics for serious cultural topics. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ENGLISH M50 – Introduction to Visual Culture. (Same as Film and Television M50.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Study of how visual media, including advertising, still and moving images, and narrative films, influence contemporary aesthetics, politics, and knowledge. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ENGLISH 100 – Ways of Reading Race. Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: English Composition 3. Introduction to interdisciplinarystudy of race and ethnicity, with primary focus on literature. Through examination of institutions that form understanding of race—citizenship, nationalism, class, gender, and labor—interrogation of how we come to think of ourselves and others as having race, and effects of such racialized thinking. Course is not about any particular racial or ethnic group, but highlights creation of ethnic categories and their effects on cultural production. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ETHNOMUSICOLOGY 40 – Music and Religion. Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of nature, role, and power of music in religious rituals around world, covering music and ritual of Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as religious traditions of Native Americans and syncretic religious practices in Americas such as African American gospel music, Brazilian Candomblé, Cuban Santería, and Haitian vodoun. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

FILM AND TELEVISION 4 – Introduction to Art and Technique of Filmmaking. (Formerly numbered 122B.)Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Students acquire understanding of practical and aesthetic challenges undertaken by artists and professionals in making of motion pictures and television. Examination of film as both art and industry: storytelling, sound and visual design, casting and performance, editing, finance, advertising, and distribution. Exploration of American and world cinema from filmmaker’s perspective. Honing of analytical skills and development of critical vocabulary for study of filmmaking as technical, artistic, and cultural phenomenon. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

GERMANIC LANGUAGES 114 – Fairy Tales and Fantastic. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Taught in English. History and reception of folklore collections in Europe, with particular attention to ideology and influence of Grimms’ tales. Interpretation of selected tales and their transformations and appropriation in literature, film, advertising, and pedagogy. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Arts and Humanities - Philosophical and Linguistic Analysis (1 Course)

LINGUISTICS 40W Language and Gender: Introduction to Gender and Stereotypes. (Formerly numbered Applied Linguistics 40W.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Prior knowledge of foreign languages not required. Introduction to language from sociological perspective of gender. Use of research and examples in English and other languages to explore nature of male and female genderlects and gendered language, as reflected in lexicon, language behavior, phonetics and intonation, and language acquisition and linguistic change. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Arts and Humanities - Visual and Performing Arts Analysis and Practice (8 Courses)

ENGLISH M50 – Introduction to Visual Culture. (Same as Film and Television M50) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Study of how visual media, including advertising, still and moving images, and narrative films, influence contemporary aesthetics, politics, and knowledge. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ETHNOMUSICOLOGY 5 – Music Around World. Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, 10 hours. Overview of world’s musical traditions by selecting one or two case studies from each of nine musical world regions: Pacific, East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, Middle East, Africa, Europe, Latin America, and U.S. and Canada. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.\

ETHNOMUSICOLOGY 30 – Music and Media. Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Exploration of ways music is mediated to people by industry, technologies, and corporations. Survey of leading theorists of media and exploration of case studies. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ETHNOMUSICOLOGY 40 – Music and Religion. Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of nature, role, and power of music in religious rituals around world, covering music and ritual of Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as religious traditions of Native Americans and syncretic religious practices in Americas such as African American gospel music, Brazilian Candomblé, Cuban Santería, and Haitian vodoun. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ETHNOMUSICOLOGY 108B – Music of Latin America: Latin South America. Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Course M108A is not requisite to 108B. Survey of traditional and contemporary musical culture. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ETHNOMUSICOLOGY 136A – Music of Africa. Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, 10 hours. Introduction to music of Africa through general discussion of select topics such as continent and its peoples, function, musician, instruments, musical structure and related arts, and contemporary music. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

FILM, TELEVISION and DIGITAL MEDIA 4 – Introduction to Art and Technique of Filmmaking. (Formerly numbered 122B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Students acquire understanding of practical and aesthetic challenges undertaken by artists and professionals in making of motion pictures and television. Examination of film as both art and industry: storytelling, sound and visual design, casting and performance, editing, finance, advertising, and distribution. Exploration of American and world cinema from filmmaker’s perspective. Honing of analytical skills and development of critical vocabulary for study of filmmaking as technical, artistic, and cultural phenomenon. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

FOOD STUDIES 35 – Visual Representations of Food from Antiquity to Present. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of food imagery in visual art from antiquity to present. Introduction to many major movements in Western art history, with primary focus on historical and sociological implications that can be derived from close analysis of visual representations of food, kitchens, markets, and agriculture over centuries. Topics of investigation include diets of ancient Romans as evidenced by floor mosaics and wall paintings of Pompeii; religious symbolism of food during Middle Ages; opulence of Renaissance banquets; common food of common folk; significance of still life paintings; what paintings can tell us about trade; turn-of-century tables; food and eroticism; economics, packaging, and advertising; and food presentation and plating as art form. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

JAPANESE 75 – Anime. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Discussion and analysis of seminal works of Japanese animation, or anime, created from 1980s to present. Engagement with works in variety of styles, and that deal with broad range of themes. Reading and discussion of recent scholarship on anime produced by scholars working in diverse modes, from philosophical to anthropological. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Society and Culture - Historical Analysis (0 Courses)

No courses for this subcategory in this track. 

Society and Culture - Social Analysis (8 Courses)

COMPARTIVE LITERATURE 1E – Social Media and Storytelling: Comparing Cultures. Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level  Writing requirement. Study of social media as platform for storytelling, with core focus on three  distinct cultures: U.S., China, and Russia. History, form, and various functions of social media. Examination of how we tell stories about ourselves and how we interpret digital narratives we see, hear, or read from organizations near and far. Analysis of networked narratives encountered online. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

DESIGN MEDIA ARTS 8 – Media Histories. Lecture, three hours; outside study, 12 hours. Synthetic overview of optical media and aesthetic movements covering past two centuries: photography and industrialization/Romanticism (1850 to 1900), cinema and modernism (1900 to 1950), television and postmodernism (1950 to 2000), and digital media and unimodernism (2000 to 2050). How such movements can inform generative work and how understanding these media becomes essential in emerging era of digital humanities. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ENGLISH 100 – Ways of Reading Race. Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: English Composition 3. Introduction to interdisciplinary study of race and ethnicity, with primary focus on literature. Through examination of institutions that form understanding of race—citizenship, nationalism, class, gender, and labor—interrogation of how we come to think of ourselves and others as having race, and effects of such racialized thinking. Course is not about any particular racial or ethnic group, but highlights creation of ethnic categories and their effects on cultural production. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ETHNOMUSICOLOGY 30 – Music and Media. Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Exploration of ways music is mediated to people by industry, technologies, and corporations. Survey of leading theorists of media and exploration of case studies. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

INFORMATION STUDIES 20 – Digital Cultures and Societies. Lecture, 5 hours. Designed for undergraduate students. Examination of social and cultural contexts of global spread of digital networks and systems. Exploration of ethical, infrastructural, and political questions raised at intersection of technologies and cultures. Topics include social media revolutions, indigenous and non-Western uses of technology, cross-cultural design, digital media literacies, and more. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

INFORMATION STUDIES 30 – Internet and Society. Lecture, five hours. Designed for undergraduate students. Examination of information technology in society, including Internet, World Wide Web, search engines (e.g., Google, Yahoo, Lycos), retrieval systems, electronic publishing, and distribution of media, including newspapers, books, and music. Exploration of many of these technologies, social, cultural, and political context in which they exist, and how social relationships are changing. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

LINGUISTICS 40W – Language and Gender: Introduction to Gender and Stereotypes. (Formerly numbered Applied Linguistics 40W) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Prior knowledge of foreign languages not required. Introduction to language from sociological perspective of gender. Use of research and examples in English and other languages to explore nature of male and female genderlects and gendered language, as reflected in lexicon, language behavior, phonetics and intonation, and language acquisition and linguistic change. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

JAPANESE 75 – Anime. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Discussion and analysis of seminal works of Japanese animation, or anime, created from 1980s to present. Engagement with works in variety of styles, and that deal with broad range of themes. Reading and discussion of recent scholarship on anime produced by scholars working in diverse modes, from philosophical to anthropological. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Scientific Inquiry - Life Science (0 Courses)

No courses for this subcategory in this Track

SCIENCE, POLITICS, AND ETHICS – Engineers, especially those involved in large-scale projects or promoted to leadership positions, will need to manage interdisciplinary teams and negotiate with multiple stakeholders. This track encourages students to develop a mindset open to scientific uncertainty, moral ambiguity, and political compromise as well as scientific, moral, and political disagreement. Learning goals include: (1) understanding under what conditions diversity feeds productively or counterproductively into a group effort; (2) developing self- and other-awareness of the emergent properties of disagreement; and (3) appreciating how different kinds of social organization promote or undercut social cognition and collective action (cooperation, competition, coordination, and collaboration).

Arts and Humanities - Literary and Cultural Analysis (3 Courses)

CLUSTER M71A – Biotechnology and Society. Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Course M71A is enforced requisite to M71B, which is enforced requisite to M71CW. Limited to first-year freshmen. Exploration of methods, applications, and implications of biotechnology and of ethical, social, and political implications as well as biological underpinnings. Letter grading. Credits: 6.0 Units.

CLUSTER M71B – Biotechnology and Society. Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: course M71A. Limited to first-year freshmen. Exploration of methods, applications, and implications of biotechnology and of ethical, social, and political implications as well as biological underpinnings. Letter grading. Credits: 6.0 Units.

CLUSTER M71CW – Biotechnology and Society. Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course M71B. Limited to first-year freshmen. Topics include in-depth examination of ethics and human genetics, bioweapons and biodefense, sex and biotechnology. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Credits: 6.0 Units.

 

Arts and Humanities - Philosophical and Linguistic Analysis (0 Courses)

No courses for this subcategory in this Track

Arts and Humanities - Visual and Performing Arts Analysis and Practice (0 Courses)

No courses for this subcategory in this Track

Society and Culture - Historical Analysis (7 Courses)

CLUSTER M71A – Biotechnology and Society. Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Course M71A is enforced requisite to M71B, which is enforced requisite to M71CW. Limited to first-year freshmen. Exploration of methods, applications, and implications of biotechnology and of ethical, social, and political implications as well as biological underpinnings. Letter grading. Credits: 6.0 Units.

CLUSTER M71B – Biotechnology and Society. Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: course M71A. Limited to first-year freshmen. Exploration of methods, applications, and implications of biotechnology and of ethical, social, and political implications as well as biological underpinnings. Letter grading. Credits: 6.0 Units.

CLUSTER M71CW – Biotechnology and Society. Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course M71B. Limited to first-year freshmen. Topics include in-depth examination of ethics and human genetics, bioweapons and biodefense, sex and biotechnology. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Credits: 6.0 Units.

HIST 2B – Social Knowledge and Social Power. Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. History of social knowledge and social power in the 19th and 20th centuries. Everyday ideas and practices about human nature, common sense, and community and relation of those practices to social thought, social engineering, and social science. Themes include development of social knowledges through public activities and discourses; how social knowledge differs in agricultural, mercantile, industrial, and information-based political economies; and how social science addresses these issues. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

HIST 3A – History of Science: Renaissance to 1800. Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Survey of beginnings of physical sciences involving transformation from Aristotelian to Newtonian cosmology, mechanization of natural world, rise of experimental science, and origin of scientific societies. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

HIST 3B – History of Science: Enlightenment to 1900. Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. In this period science became part of Enlightenment campaign for reason and of culture of an Industrial Revolution. New social science and evolutionary debates about science and religion demonstrate its rising intellectual and practical significance. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

HIST 3C – History of Science: 20th Century. Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Ranging from startling new physics of relativity and the quantum, and of nuclear weapons, to molecular reductionism in biology and campaigns for statistical objectivity, examination of involvement of science in technological, military, intellectual, and political changes of the 20th century. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Society and Culture - Social Analysis (7 Courses)

CLUSTER M71A – Biotechnology and Society. Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Course M71A is enforced requisite to M71B, which is enforced requisite to M71CW. Limited to first-year freshmen. Exploration of methods, applications, and implications of biotechnology and of ethical, social, and political implications as well as biological underpinnings. Letter grading. Credits: 6.0 Units.

CLUSTER M71B – Biotechnology and Society. Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: course M71A. Limited to first-year freshmen. Exploration of methods, applications, and implications of biotechnology and of ethical, social, and political implications as well as biological underpinnings. Letter grading. Credits: 6.0 Units.

CLUSTER M71CW – Biotechnology and Society. Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course M71B. Limited to first-year freshmen. Topics include in-depth examination of ethics and human genetics, bioweapons and biodefense, sex and biotechnology. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Credits: 6.0 Units.

MCD BIO 50 – Stem Cell Biology, Politics, and Ethics: Teasing Apart Issues. Lecture, three and one half hours; discussion, 90 minutes. Developmental biology of various types of human stem cells. Important functional differences between embryonic, hematopoietic, and adult stem cells, as well as differences in their biomedical potentials. Discussion of history of debate surrounding embryos, as well as various social, ethical, political, and economic aspects of stem cell research. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

POL SCI 60 – Ethics and Governance. Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). To study question of can’t we all just get along, students play games of cooperation, coordination, collaboration, and competition and examine whether and how diversity, disagreement, and democracy influence game play, to understand under what conditions diversity feeds productively or counterproductively into group effort. Development of self- and other-awareness of emergent properties of disagreement to appreciate how different kinds of social organization promote or undercut social cognition and collective action. Such understanding needs to develop bottom-up through experiential and interactive learning, active and analytical learning, systems thinking, and realworld application. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

PUB AFF M130 – Biomedical, Social, and Policy Frontiers in Human Aging. (Same as Gerontology M108 an Social Welfare M108.) Lecture, four hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Course of human aging charted in ways that are based on variety of recent research frontiers. Use of conceptual frameworks to increase relevance of aging to students’ lives and enhance their critical thinking—biopsychosocial approach that is based on recognition that aging is inherently interdisciplinary phenomenon, and life course perspective that is distinguished by analytical framework it provides for understanding interplay between human lives and changing social structures, and allows students to understand how events, successes, and losses at one stage of life can have important effects later in life. Focus on individuals as they age within one particular sociohistorical context. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

SOC GEN 5 – Integrative Approaches to Human Biology and Society. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to concept of problem-based approaches to study of biology and society and areas of concentration, such as bioethics and public science policy, evolutionary biology, culture, and behavior, historical and social studies of life sciences, medical genetics and public health, and population genetics and history, and central thematic issues shared across concentrations, such as commercialization of life and public understanding of science. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Scientific Inquiry - Life Science (5 Courses)

CLUSTER M71A Biotechnology and Society. Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Course M71A is enforced requisite to M71B, which is enforced requisite to M71CW. Limited to first-year freshmen. Exploration of methods, applications, and implications of biotechnology and of ethical, social, and political implications as well as biological underpinnings. Letter grading. Credits: 6.0 Units.

CLUSTER M71B Biotechnology and Society. Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: course M71A. Limited to first-year freshmen. Exploration of methods, applications, and implications of biotechnology and of ethical, social, and political implications as well as biological underpinnings. Letter grading. Credits: 6.0 Units.

CLUSTER M71CW Biotechnology and Society. Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course M71B. Limited to first-year freshmen. Topics include in-depth examination of ethics and human genetics, bioweapons and biodefense, sex and biotechnology. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Credits: 6.0 Units.

SOC GEN 5 – Integrative Approaches to Human Biology and Society. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to concept of problem-based approaches to study of biology and society and areas of concentration, such as bioethics and public science policy, evolutionary biology, culture, and behavior, historical and social studies of life sciences, medical genetics and public health, and population genetics and history, and central thematic issues shared across concentrations, such as commercialization of life and public understanding of science. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

MCD BIO 50 – Stem Cell Biology, Politics, and Ethics: Teasing Apart Issues. Lecture, three and one half hours; discussion, 90 minutes. Developmental biology of various types of human stem cells. Important functional differences between embryonic, hematopoietic, and adult stem cells, as well as differences in their biomedical potentials. Discussion of history of debate surrounding embryos, as well as various social, ethical, political, and economic aspects of stem cell research. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Art History – This track develops skills for describing and analyzing art and design of the built environment in a wide range of geographical contexts. Exploring materials, technologies, and economic conditions for conceiving, constructing, and exhibiting cultural forms, students are able to imagine and anticipate solutions to problems. Tracing and understanding inventive thinking in historical situations, each with diverse social and political considerations, students engage with the persuasive and sensory effects of art and architecture.

Arts and Humanities - Literary and Cultural Analysis (6 Courses)

ART HIS 20 – Ancient Art. Lecture, three hours; quiz, one hour; museum field trips. Prehistoric, Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Aegean, Greek, Hellenistic, and Roman art and architecture. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 21 – Medieval Art. Lecture, three hours; quiz, one hour. Early Christian, Byzantine, Islamic, Carolingian, Ottonian, Romanesque, and Gothic art and architecture. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 22 – Renaissance and Baroque Art. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of Renaissance and baroque art. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 25 – Museum Studies. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; museum field trips. General introduction to study of museums in their social and historical contexts. Examination of debates about museum’s role in society through case studies and analysis of exhibitions in range of museums including art, history, and ethnographic museums. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 27 – Art and Architecture of Ancient Americas. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; museum field trips. Introduction to art, architecture, and urbanism of Americas (North to South) from earliest settlement until AD 1450. Analysis of variety of media within their historical and cultural context. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 31 – Art of India and Southeast Asia. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; museum field trips. Discussion of selection of monuments and objects from Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia using key historical, cultural, and religious concepts. Analysis of each monument or object in detail, with their relationships compared and contrasted. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Arts and Humanities - Philosophical and Linguistic Analysis (0 Courses)

No courses for this subcategory in this Track. 

Arts and Humanities - Visual and Performing Arts Analysis and Practice (9 Courses)

ART HIS 20 – Ancient Art. Lecture, three hours; quiz, one hour; museum field trips. Prehistoric, Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Aegean, Greek, Hellenistic, and Roman art and architecture. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 21 – Medieval Art. Lecture, three hours; quiz, one hour. Early Christian, Byzantine, Islamic, Carolingian, Ottonian, Romanesque, and Gothic art and architecture. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 22 – Renaissance and Baroque Art. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of Renaissance and baroque art. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 23 – Modern Art. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; museum field trips. History of modern art from 1860s to 1960s, from Manet and impressionists to pop art and minimalism. Study of origins and social functions, as well as aesthetic innovations and philosophical dilemmas of modernism. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 24 – Architecture in Modern World. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to study of architectural history through examination of built world of past two centuries. Building technologies and forms of economic, social, and political life have produced modern built environment that is both diverse and increasingly connected. Focus on factors that have affected architecture globally and those that give regions, cultures, and historical periods their particular qualities. Topics include architectural and urban ramifications of modern self-consciousness, nationalism and internationalism, industrialism, colonialism and anticolonialism, and new art and architectural theories. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 27 – Art and Architecture of Ancient Americas. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; museum field trips. Introduction to art, architecture, and urbanism of Americas (North to South) from earliest settlement until AD 1450. Analysis of variety of media within their historical and cultural context. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 28 – Arts of Africa. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; museum field trips. Introduction to arts and architecture of Africa. Examination of social and historical contexts of their production. Introduction to body of information within framework of conceptual problem through series of case studies. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 30 – Arts of Japan. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; museum field trips. General introduction to art, architecture, and material culture of Japan, from earliest records to present. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 31 – Art of India and Southeast Asia. (5) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; museum field trips. Discussion of selection of monuments and objects from Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia using key historical, cultural, and religious concepts. Analysis of each monument or object in detail, with their relationships compared and contrasted. P/NP or letter grading 

Society and Culture - Historical Analysis (5 Courses)

ART HIS 20 – Ancient Art. Lecture, three hours; quiz, one hour; museum field trips. Prehistoric, Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Aegean, Greek, Hellenistic, and Roman art and architecture. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 21 – Medieval Art. Lecture, three hours; quiz, one hour. Early Christian, Byzantine, Islamic, Carolingian, Ottonian, Romanesque, and Gothic art and architecture. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 24 – Architecture in Modern World. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to study of architectural history through examination of built world of past two centuries. Building technologies and forms of economic, social, and political life have produced modern built environment that is both diverse and increasingly connected. Focus on factors that have affected architecture globally and those that give regions, cultures, and historical periods their particular qualities. Topics include architectural and urban ramifications of modern self-consciousness, nationalism and internationalism, industrialism, colonialism and anticolonialism, and new art and architectural theories. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 28 – Arts of Africa. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; museum field trips. Introduction to arts and architecture of Africa. Examination of social and historical contexts of their production. Introduction to body of information within framework of conceptual problem through series of case studies. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ART HIS 30 – Arts of Japan. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; museum field trips. General introduction to art, architecture, and material culture of Japan, from earliest records to present. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Society and Culture - Social Analysis (1 Course)

ART HIS 25 – Museum Studies. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; museum field trips. General introduction to study of museums in their social and historical contexts. Examination of debates about museum’s role in society through case studies and analysis of exhibitions in range of museums including art, history, and ethnographic museums. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.
 

Scientific Inquiry - Life Science (0 Courses)

No courses for this subcategory in this Track. 

 

Middle Eastern Studies – The various GE courses in the Middle Eastern Studies track cover 5000 years of history, archaeology, politics, and culture. If you’re interested in the premodern cultures of Egypt, Nubia, Palestine, Israel, Syria, Iraq, and Iran, this is the place for you. Our courses cover the globe’s first kingships, first cities, first regional states, and first empires and all that came after. Religious studies—what is the origin of monotheism? Where was it invented, Israel or Iran?—make an appearance in our GEs. Social justice also takes center stage—why don’t we accept women as rulers? Why are ethic/religious minorities pushed out of government? And competition over space is central as we discuss the generations of contestation over places like Jerusalem or Cairo or Bagdad. So many of the complications of the modern world can (and should) be examined through the lens of the past. Many of our courses are Writing Intensive, allowing you to understand rhetoric and argument. We also offer a variety of Diversity requirements.

Arts and Humanities - Literary and Cultural Analysis (8 Courses)

RELIGN M10 – Introduction to Judaism. (Same as Jewish Studies M10) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Judaism’s basic beliefs, institutions, and practices. Topics include development of biblical and rabbinic Judaism; concepts of god, sin, repentance, prayer, and the messiah; history of Talmud and synagogue; evolution of folk beliefs and year-cycle and life-cycle practices. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ANCIENT NEAR EAST 12W – Jerusalem: Holy City. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: English Composition 3. Survey of modern Middle Eastern cultures through readings and films from Middle East and North Africa. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ANCIENT NEAR EAST M50A – First Civilization. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures–Judaism, Christianity, and Islam–historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ANCIENT NEAR EAST M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures–Judaism, Christianity, and Islam–historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ANCIENT NEAR EAST M50CW – Making and Studying Modern Middle East. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: English Composition 3. Survey of modern Middle Eastern cultures through readings and films from Middle East and North Africa. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

65 Global Time Travel. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Time travel is our most effective fictional device for asking what past was like, what future will bring, and how our present might look when viewed from other times. Though often associated with Euro-American genre of hard science fiction, time travel is global genre. Study of time travel stories, novels, television productions, and films from variety of periods, regions, and languages in order to explore anxieties genre responds to and other worlds it helps us imagine. Examination of theorists and critics whose work helps explain how time travel interacts with history, narrative, and visuality. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

RELIGN M115 – Islam and Other Religions. (Same as Islamic Studies M115) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Students gain familiarity with historical cases and modes of interaction between Muslims and non-Muslims in plural societies. Consideration of axis questions such as how does Qur’an reflect religious plurality; how does it situate Islam vis-à-vis its alternatives; what encounters did rapid expansion of Islam bring about in diverse societies; how did Islam and other religions change through debate, war, and exchange of ideas; what roles has political power played in conditioning interreligious interaction; how have conversion and hybridity affected what it means to be Muslim; what is different about interreligious interactions in secular states and societies; and how is past invoked to justify opinions and policies today. Investigation of these questions by conducting microstudies: close readings of sources through theoretical lens. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ANCIENT NEAR EAST M130 – Ancient Egyptian Religion. (Same as Religion M130) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to religious beliefs, practices, and sentiments of ancient Egypt to study Egyptian religion as coherent system of thought and sphere of action that once served as meaningful and relevant framework for understanding physical reality and human life for inhabitants of Nile Valley. General principles as well as developments through time (circa 3000 BC to 300 CE). Topics include mythology, temple and cult, magic, and personal piety. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Arts and Humanities - Philosophical and Linguistic Analysis (3 Courses)

RELIGN M20 – Introduction to Islam. (Formerly numbered M109. Same as Islamic Studies M20) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Genesis of Islam, its doctrines, and practices, with readings from Qur’an and Hadith; schools of law and theology; piety and Sufism; reform and modernism. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

M20 Visible Language: Study of Writing. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Consideration of concrete means of language representation in writing systems. Earliest representations of language known are those of Near East dating to end of 4th millennium BC. While literate civilizations of Egypt, Indus Valley, China, and Mesoamerica left little evidence of corresponding earliest developments, their antiquity and, in case of China and Mesoamerica, their evident isolation mark these centers as loci of independent developments in writing. Basic characteristics of early scripts, assessment of modern alphabetic writing systems, and presentation of conceptual basis of semiotic language representation. Origins and development of early non-Western writing systems. How Greco-Roman alphabet arose in 1st millennium BC and how it compares to other modern writing systems. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ANCIENT NEAR EAST M130 – Ancient Egyptian Religion. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to religious beliefs, practices, and sentiments of ancient Egypt to study Egyptian religion as coherent system of thought and sphere of action that once served as meaningful and relevant framework for understanding physical reality and human life for inhabitants of Nile Valley. General principles as well as developments through time (circa 3000 BC to 300 CE). Topics include mythology, temple and cult, magic, and personal piety. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units. 

Arts and Humanities - Visual and Performing Arts Analysis and Practice (1 Course)

IRANIAN 55 – Gender and Sexuality in Arts and Literatures of Iran and Middle East. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Multifaceted introduction to Persian poetry, recognized as jewel of Persian culture, and to pictorial, architectural, performative, cinematographic, and photographic dimensions of artistic milieu spanning between Balkans, India, and Central Asia from 10th century CE to present. With consideration of centrality of discourses on identity, desire, and spirituality to core of Persian aesthetics, study of broad variety of socioanthropological, ethical, and historiographical issues stemming from both mainstream topics characterizing extensive field of Iranian studies and most controversial conversations on nature of sexuality, ethnicity, and religion. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Society and Culture - Historical Analysis (7 Courses)

ANCIENT NEAR EAST 14W – Medicine, Magic, and Science in Ancient Times. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: English Composition 3. Overview of history of medicine and sciences, focusing especially on Ancient Near East, China, and Meso-America. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ANCIENT NEAR EAST 15/15W – Women and Power in Ancient World. Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 15. Examination of how feminine power confronts masculine dominance within complex social systems in ancient world. To gain political power, some female rulers used their sexuality to gain access to important men. Other women gained their position as regents and helpers of masculine kings who were too young to rule. Others denied their femininity in dress and manner, effectively androgynizing themselves or pretending to be men so that their femininity would not be obstacle to political rule. Many women only gained throne at end of dynasties after male line had run out entirely, or in midst of civil war when patrilineal successions were in disarray. No women were able to gain reigns of power through their bloodlines alone. Women’s power was compromised from outset. Examination of root causes and results of this political inequality. Satisfies Writing II requirement. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ISLM ST M20 – Introduction to Islam. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Genesis of Islam, its doctrines, and practices, with readings from Qur’an and Hadith; schools of law and theology; piety and Sufism; reform and modernism. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ANCIENT NEAR EAST M50A – First Civilization. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures–Judaism, Christianity, and Islam–historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ANCIENT NEAR EAST M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures–Judaism, Christianity, and Islam–historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ANCIENT NEAR EAST M60 – Achaemenid Civilization and Empire of Alexander. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction of archaeological record of southern Levant (ancient Israel) from Bronze Age through Achaemenid Period (ca. 2500-332 BC) in combination with current understandings of genre, authorship, and historical value of Hebrew Bible. Ancient Israelite identities are traced through combination of archaeological and textual sources. Social, religious, and political traditions of ancient Israel and Judah are interpreted in context of both earlier Bronze Age traditions and Israel’s Iron Age neighbors. Archaeological and textual data for identities, such as Amorites, Canaanites, Phoenicians, Egyptians, Assyrians, and Babylonians, form basis for evaluating construction and maintenance of various biblical identities. Introduction to theoretical and methodological issues involving historical archaeology of ancient Israel and Levant, and possibilities for investigating negotiation of identity in archaeological record. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ISLM ST M107 – Islam in West. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Acquisition of understanding of basic doctrines and practices of Islam. Survey of history of Islam in West, with focus on U.S. and France. Analysis of issues relevant to growth and development of selected Muslim communities in West. Exposure to diverse expressions of Islam through independent research on Muslim communities and institutions in U.S. Development of strong analytical writing and speaking skills. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Society and Culture - Social Analysis (5 Courses)

JEWISH 10W – Jerusalem: Holy City. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: English Composition 3. Survey of modern Middle Eastern cultures through readings and films from Middle East and North Africa. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

IRANIAN 55 – Gender and Sexuality in Arts and Literatures of Iran and Middle East. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Multifaceted introduction to Persian poetry, recognized as jewel of Persian culture, and to pictorial, architectural, performative, cinematographic, and photographic dimensions of artistic milieu spanning between Balkans, India, and Central Asia from 10th century CE to present. With consideration of centrality of discourses on identity, desire, and spirituality to core of Persian aesthetics, study of broad variety of socioanthropological, ethical, and historiographical issues stemming from both mainstream topics characterizing extensive field of Iranian studies and most controversial conversations on nature of sexuality, ethnicity, and religion. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

RELIGN M107 – Islam in West. (Same as Arabic M107 and Islamic Studies M107) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Acquisition of understanding of basic doctrines and practices of Islam. Survey of history of Islam in West, with focus on U.S. and France. Analysis of issues relevant to growth and development of selected Muslim communities in West. Exposure to diverse expressions of Islam through independent research on Muslim communities and institutions in U.S. Development of strong analytical writing and speaking skills. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

RELIGN M115 – Islam and Other Religions. (Same as Islamic Studies M115) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Students gain familiarity with historical cases and modes of interaction between Muslims and non-Muslims in plural societies. Consideration of axis questions such as how does Qur’an reflect religious plurality; how does it situate Islam vis-à-vis its alternatives; what encounters did rapid expansion of Islam bring about in diverse societies; how did Islam and other religions change through debate, war, and exchange of ideas; what roles has political power played in conditioning interreligious interaction; how have conversion and hybridity affected what it means to be Muslim; what is different about interreligious interactions in secular states and societies; and how is past invoked to justify opinions and policies today. Investigation of these questions by conducting microstudies: close readings of sources through theoretical lens. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

ANCIENT NEAR EAST 162 – Archaeology, Identity, and Bible. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction of archaeological record of southern Levant (ancient Israel) from Bronze Age through Achaemenid Period (ca. 2500-332 BC) in combination with current understandings of genre, authorship, and historical value of Hebrew Bible. Ancient Israelite identities are traced through combination of archaeological and textual sources. Social, religious, and political traditions of ancient Israel and Judah are interpreted in context of both earlier Bronze Age traditions and Israel’s Iron Age neighbors. Archaeological and textual data for identities, such as Amorites, Canaanites, Phoenicians, Egyptians, Assyrians, and Babylonians, form basis for evaluating construction and maintenance of various biblical identities. Introduction to theoretical and methodological issues involving historical archaeology of ancient Israel and Levant, and possibilities for investigating negotiation of identity in archaeological record. P/NP or letter grading. Credits: 5.0 Units.

Scientific Inquiry - Life Science (0 Courses)

No courses for this subcategory in this Track.