Undergraduate GE Tracks

While an engineering student may choose any set of courses that meet the GE requirements as detailed in the announcement, this page provides “GE Tracks” that allow a student to meet some  of the GE requirements (typically  three of the five courses) while exploring a particular topic or theme in depth.  The goal of these GE Tracks is to provide students with avenues through which they can engage more deeply with GE content in ways that can encourage personal growth and help students better prepare for their professional careers.

Before exploring the GE Tracks, it is a good idea to develop a complete understanding of the engineering GE requirements, which are described in full in the announcement under Requirements for the BS (Scroll to General Education)

CLASSICS - this track acquaints you with the study of ancient Greece and Rome and their political, social, artistic, and intellectual legacy. The area of inquiry spans more than two thousand years, from the art and archaeology of the Mediterranean Bronze Age (ca. 1700 B.C.E.) to the breakdown of the Roman empire in Late Antiquity (ca. 400 C.E.). The interdisciplinary nature of the track offers its students a broad range of courses in the fields of language, literature, religion, mythology, philosophy, political history, cultural studies, digital humanities, virtual reality, archaeology, art, and film. The Classics GE track offers a unique perspective on relations between the past and the present and cultivates both breadth of knowledge and precision in writing and thinking. This track is an ideal complement to an Engineering education. It should be of particular interest to students who are intellectually curious and who wish to receive an expansive and exciting introduction to humanistic inquiry.

Arts and Humanities - Literary and Cultural Analysis

CLASSICS 10 – Discovering the Greeks: Knowledge of Greek not required. Study of Greek life and culture from age of Homer to Roman conquest. Readings focus on selections from works of ancient authors in translation. Lectures illustrated with images of art, architecture, and material culture. P/NP or letter grading.

CLASSICS 20 – Discovering the Romans: Knowledge of Latin not required. Study of Roman life and culture from time of city’s legendary foundations to end of classical antiquity. Readings focus on selections from works of ancient authors in translation. Lectures illustrated with images of art, architecture, and material culture. P/NP or letter grading.

CLASSICS 30 – Classical Mythology: Introduction to myths and legends of ancient Greece and/or Rome, role of those stories in their societies, and modern approaches to studying them. P/NP or letter grading.

CLASSICS 40W – Reading Greek Literature: Writing-Intensive: Requisite: English Composition 3. Exploration in detail and from variety of critical perspectives of carefully selected literary texts characteristic of ancient Greece and significant in Western literary tradition. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

CLASSICS 41W – Reading Roman Literature: Writing-Intensive: Requisite: English Composition 3. Exploration in detail and from variety of critical perspectives of carefully selected set of literary texts characteristic of ancient Rome and significant in Western literary tradition. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

CLASSICS 42 – Cinema and Ancient World: Use of popular culture and cinema to introduce students to ancient Greek and/or Roman culture; focus at discretion of instructor. P/NP or letter grading.

CLASSICS 48 – Ancient Greek and Roman Medicine: Introduction to Greek and Roman medicine in its intellectual and cultural context. Examination of construction of concepts such as health, disease, physician, man, woman, cause, and difference. Readings from Greek literature and healing in cult of Asclepius. Readings of texts from Hippocratic collection, thought to be close to practice and theory of 5th-century BCE Greek physician, relating them to medical practice, competition for students and patients, intellectual display, developing scientific methods, ethnography, and Greek philosophy. Discussion of plagues as attempts to view such outbreaks as social phenomena. Examination of how Hippocratic understanding of how–or whether–we can know about what happens inside body was developed and challenged in 3rd-century BCE Alexandria. Study of Prince of Physicians, Galen, champion of Hippocratic medicine, influential into 18th century. P/NP or letter grading.

CLASSICS 51A – Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece: Survey of major period, theme, or medium of Greek art and archaeology at discretion of instructor. P/NP or letter grading.

CLASSICS 51B – Art and Archaeology of Ancient Rome: Survey of major period, theme, or medium of Roman art and archaeology at discretion of instructor. P/NP or letter grading.

CLASSICS 60 – Fantastic Journey: Antiquity and Beyond: Investigation of phenomenon of fantastic or imaginary journey, from Homer’s “Odyssey” to Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey.” Examination of ways in which travel to strange or new worlds is presented through number of texts (and occasionally films) across different cultures and periods, with focus primarily on antiquity but also looking at how important motifs from ancient Greek and Roman travel narratives have endured to present day. Issues include cultural relativism, what makes space either familiar or alien, rebuilding of home in fantastic territories, methods of travel (both fantastic and mundane), methods of measuring time and distance across space, modern classifications of fantasy and science fiction, and to what extent these terms are applicable to ancient world. P/NP or letter grading.

CLASSICS 88GE – General Education Seminar:  Focused study of one aspect of ancient Greek or Roman culture or reception of classical tradition. Topics are interdisciplinary in nature (literature, arts, religion, politics, culture) and make connections between ancient and postclassical eras. Topics include rediscovery of Pompeii and Herculaneum; Roman religion and literature; pleasures of Greek or Roman body; and 18th-century British literature and reception of classics. P/NP or letter grading.

CLASSICS 148 – Early Greek Medicine and Thought: Versions of medical theory and practice in context of Greek intellectual and cultural developments. Readings from medical, philosophical, and historical texts. P/NP or letter grading.

Arts and Humanities -Philosophical and Linguistic Analysis

CLASSICS 148 – Early Greek Medicine and Thought: Versions of medical theory and practice in context of Greek intellectual and cultural developments. Readings from medical, philosophical, and historical texts. P/NP or letter grading.

CLASSICS 185 – Origins and Nature of English Vocabulary: Origins and nature of English vocabulary, from Proto-Indo-European prehistory to current slang. Topics include Greek and Latin component in English (including technical terminology), alphabet and English spelling, semantic change and word formation, vocabulary in literature and film. P/NP or letter grading.

Arts and Humanities - Visual and Performing Arts Analysis

CLASSICS 42 – Cinema and Ancient World: Use of popular culture and cinema to introduce students to ancient Greek and/or Roman culture; focus at discretion of instructor. P/NP or letter grading.

CLASSICS 51A – Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece: Survey of major period, theme, or medium of Greek art and archaeology at discretion of instructor. P/NP or letter grading.

CLASSICS 51B – Art and Archaeology of Ancient Rome: Survey of major period, theme, or medium of Roman art and archaeology at discretion of instructor. P/NP or letter grading.

Society and Culture - Historical Analysis

CLASSICS 10 – Discovering the Greeks: Knowledge of Greek not required. Study of Greek life and culture from age of Homer to Roman conquest. Readings focus on selections from works of ancient authors in translation. Lectures illustrated with images of art, architecture, and material culture. P/NP or letter grading.

CLASSICS 20 – Discovering the Romans: Knowledge of Latin not required. Study of Roman life and culture from time of city’s legendary foundations to end of classical antiquity. Readings focus on selections from works of ancient authors in translation. Lectures illustrated with images of art, architecture, and material culture. P/NP or letter grading.

CLASSICS 48 – Ancient Greek and Roman Medicine: Introduction to Greek and Roman medicine in its intellectual and cultural context. Examination of construction of concepts such as health, disease, physician, man, woman, cause, and difference. Readings from Greek literature and healing in cult of Asclepius. Readings of texts from Hippocratic collection, thought to be close to practice and theory of 5th-century BCE Greek physician, relating them to medical practice, competition for students and patients, intellectual display, developing scientific methods, ethnography, and Greek philosophy. Discussion of plagues as attempts to view such outbreaks as social phenomena. Examination of how Hippocratic understanding of how–or whether–we can know about what happens inside body was developed and challenged in 3rd-century BCE Alexandria. Study of Prince of Physicians, Galen, champion of Hippocratic medicine, influential into 18th century. P/NP or letter grading.

Society and Culture - Social Analysis

CLASSICS 30 – Classical Mythology: Introduction to myths and legends of ancient Greece and/or Rome, role of those stories in their societies, and modern approaches to studying them. P/NP or letter grading.

Scientific Inquiry - Life Science

No Courses for this subcategory in this track

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE URBAN RESILIENT SYSTEMS - This track will introduce the students to environmental resilience and recovery in an age of disturbances, such as increased population, urbanization, resource depletion, industrialization, and climate change. In urban settings, it is even more crucial that the natural and built environments support a healthy, productive, and sustainable society. Through the diverse and balanced course portfolio, the students will gain a comprehensive understanding of urban environmental issues as well as an integrated approach to keeping the planet safe for humanity

Arts and Humanities - Literary and Cultural Analysis

Society of Excess: On Waste, Consumer Culture, and Environment (HNRS 44)Examination of waste in both real and virtual worlds, looking in interdisciplinary ways at various cultural representations of trash set against backdrop of society of excess and environment constantly threatened by overflowing and mismanaged waste, including social and cultural responses to physical waste and cyber battle against Internet debris.

Arts and Humanities -Philosophical and Linguistic Analysis

No Courses for this subcategory in this Track

Arts and Humanities - Visual and Performing Arts Analysis

Design Culture (DESMA 10)Understanding design process, with emphasis on development of visual language; study of historic, scientific, technological, economic, and cultural factors influencing design in physical environment.

Architecture in Modern World (ART HIS 24) Formerly numbered 58.)Introduction to study of architectural history through examination of built world of past two centuries. Building technologies and forms of economic, social, and political life have produced modern built environment that is both diverse and increasingly connected. Focus on factors that have affected architecture globally and those that give regions, cultures, and historical periods their particular qualities. Topics include architectural and urban ramifications of modern self‐consciousness, nationalism and internationalism, industrialism, colonialism and anticolonialism, and new art and architectural theories.

Introduction to Architectural Studies (ARCH&UD 30)Exploration of role of built environment in social, cultural, and political life: how buildings are constructed, what they mean, effects they have on world, and ways they imagine new futures and shape private and public life. Focus on series of contemporary case studies for what each reveals about new possibilities for shaping world in which we live, with emphasis on how architecture extends to cities, roads, books, and films. Consideration of historical context and cultural genealogy of particular buildings and environments, material and economic conditions of building, and more.

Society and Culture - Historical Analysis

Globalization: Regional Development and World Economy (GEOG 4)Economic geography explores spatial distribution of all forms of human productive activity at number of geographical scales‐‐local, regional, national, and global. Key theme is impact of increasingly powerful global economic forces on organization of production.

History of Architecture and Urban Design: Prehistory to Mannerism (ARCH&UD 10A)Exploration of developments in global architecture and urban design from prehistory to 1600 and critical reflection on terms such as building, architecture, city, history, and culture. Focus on world context, construction and technology, and history of architectural ideas.

History of Architecture and Urban Design: Baroque to Contemporary Moment X (ARCH&UD 10B)Survey of architectural and urban history from 1600 to present in global context. Exploration of buildings, cities, spaces, artifacts, landscapes, and ideas through their relation to geopolitical conditions and through their relation to theories of design.

Architecture in Modern World (ART HIS 24)(Formerly numbered 58.) Introduction to study of architectural history through examination of built world of past two centuries. Building technologies and forms of economic, social, and political life have produced modern built environment that is both diverse and increasingly connected. Focus on factors that have affected architecture globally and those that give regions, cultures, and historical periods their particular qualities. Topics include architectural and urban ramifications of modern self‐consciousness, nationalism and internationalism, industrialism, colonialism and anti-colonialism, and new art and architectural theories.

Society and Culture - Social Analysis

World Regions: Concepts and Contemporary Issues (GEOG 6)Interdisciplinary and historical approach to modern peoples, their differences in wealth or poverty, and their local origins of food production. Brief introduction to physical geography and biogeography of each region. Discussion of each region’s peoples, languages, foods, pre-histories, and histories.

Public Policy and Urban Homelessness (PUB PLC 10D)Application of policy analysis to issues and solutions concerning homelessness. Guest lectures from local policymakers.

Los Angeles Tech City: Digital Technologies and Spatial Justice (DGT HUM 30)Advanced Topics in Urban Humanities

Introduction to Statistical Methods for Geography and Environmental Studies (STATS 12)Introduction to statistical thinking and understanding, with emphasis on techniques used in geography and environmental science. Underlying logic behind statistical procedures, role of variation in statistical thinking, strengths and limitations of statistical summaries, and fundamental inferential tools. Emphasis on applications in geography and environmental science in laboratory work using professional statistical analysis package, including spatial statistics.

Understanding Ecology: Finding Interdisciplinary Solutions to Environmental Problems (HNRS 41)Exploration of ecological basis of planet’s most important environmental issues, including global climate change, ocean acidification, biodiversity loss, deforestation, pollution, and declining freshwater resources and fisheries. Examination of both hard science and interdisciplinary solutions (social, political, educational) to environmental problems

Scientific Inquiry - Life Science

People and the Earth’s Ecosystems (GEOG 5)Exploration of ways in which human activity impacts natural environment and how modification of environment can eventually have significant consequences for human activity. Examination, using case studies, of real environmental problems that confront us today.

Good Food for Everyone: Health, Sustainability, and Culture (ENVIRON 25)Good food is healthy, sustainably produced, and culturally meaningful. Introduction to basic concepts and history of food systems, food science and nutrition, fair and sustainable food production, natural resources and environmental issues including climate change and biodiversity, agriculture and food policy and law, food distribution and access, cultural identity and artistic engagements with food.

Understanding Ecology: Finding Interdisciplinary Solutions to Environmental Problems (HNRS 41)Exploration of ecological basis of planet’s most important environmental issues, including global climate change, ocean acidification, biodiversity loss, deforestation, pollution, and declining freshwater resources and fisheries. Examination of both hard science and interdisciplinary solutions (social, political, educational) to environmental problems

Why Ecology Matters: Science Behind Environmental Issues (EE BIOL 18)Basic ecological concepts, scientific method, and ecological basis for local and global environmental issues. Major challenges to be faced in this century, including need to find interdisciplinary and collaborative solutions to world’s worsening environmental problems (e.g., global climate change, biodiversity loss, deforestation, pollution, declining water resources, declining fisheries). Environmental literacy to equip students to become leaders in growing green economy and to help forge solutions to current and future environmental crises that threaten natural resource base.

Biogeography: Spatial Dynamics of Biogeography in a changing world (GEOG 2)Biogeographic exploration of plant and animal diversity and conservation issues on continents and islands around world. Study of physical, biotic, and human factors responsible for evolution, persistence, and extinction of species and ecological communities. Analysis of effects of human activity..

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (ENV HLT 207)Designed for freshmen/sophomores. Introduction to fundamental principles and concepts necessary to carry out sound geographic analysis with geographic information systems (GIS). Reinforcement of key issues in GIS, such as geographic coordinate systems, map projections, spatial analysis, and visualization of spatial data. Laboratory exercises use database query, manipulation, and spatial analysis to address real‐world problems.