Engineering School-wide Course Offerings

2. Technology and Society

Units: 2

Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, three hours. Introduction of broader societal opportunities, impacts, and challenges associated with technology. Drawing from historical and contemporary examples, consideration of some of ethical, policy, and legal questions spurred by rapid technological change. Development of perspectives to take broad, contextualized view of role of technology in society. Letter grading.

23. Finding an Industry Internship

Units: 2

Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Designed to engage engineering students in process of formal career development. Students learn about various components of internship/job application and practice preparing relevant materials. Prepares students for career-related social interactions. Development of skills and insights to successfully secure future opportunities, such as first industry internship. P/NP grading.

24. Finding Undergraduate Research Opportunity

Units: 2

Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Designed to engage engineering students, primarily those without prior experience, in process of soliciting, securing, and beginning research. Students learn about various methods and resources used to obtain laboratory position. Exploration of opportunities and guidance on how to approach those openings. Offers students smooth transition into research laboratory. P/NP grading.

25. Communicating Undergraduate Research Results

Units: 2

Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Designed to engage engineering students in process of communicating formal research. Students learn about various components required in publishing research. Offers templates and examples as guides for understanding technical presentations and writing. Development of skills and insights to successfully publish first research project. P/NP grading.

87. Introduction to Engineering Disciplines

Units: 4

Lecture, four hours; discussion, four hours; outside study, four hours. Introduction to engineering as professional opportunity for freshman students by exploring difference between engineering disciplines and functions engineers perform. Development of skills and techniques for academic excellence through team process. Investigation of national need underlying current effort to increase participation of historically underrepresented groups in U.S. technological work force. Letter grading.

96A. Introduction to Engineering Design - Topic Varies (see below for sample of topics offered)

Units: 2

(Formerly numbered 96.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, one hour; outside study, four hours. Introduction to engineering design while building teamwork and communication skills and examination of engineering majors offered at UCLA and of engineering careers. Completion of hands-on engineering design projects, preparation of short report describing projects, and presentation of results. Specific project details and relevant majors explored vary with instructor. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.

3D Pharmaceuticals:

3D Pharming is an emerging field which tries to achieve more patient specific drug dosages and delivery rates that can be tailored towards each patients’ age, weight, height, genotype, etc. This direction in medicine has become possible with the development of 3D printing, specifically the ability to 3D print pill capsules as well as laser print “bioinks,” which are aqueous  hydrogel formulations with correct mechanical properties to interact with a 3D printer, on demand. These bioinks are able to dissolve drugs and polymerize into a solid to form your drug delivery vehicle. In this course, we will teach you the basic fundamentals for such a project, namely how to 3D print a pill capsule and how to polymerize a hydrogel within it. We will then walk you through the process of designing a research experiment, analyzing the data, and presenting your findings to others.

AI City

Introduction to engineering design and artificial intelligence fundamentals in the context of developing a fully autonomous virtual city. Exposure to concepts such as: search and planning, neural networks, clustering, evolutionary algorithms, Bayesian inference. Students design and implement intelligent components of systems in a simulated urban topology using Python. Students submit weekly coding assignments and present their final work orally. 

Autonomous Rover

Students utilize concepts and tools in mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, and computer science to design and build rovers under wireless control and also able to autonomously navigate and respond to environmental cues. Students will design the robot chassis, connect motors and control/sensory electronics, and program the system to map its environment and achieve the mission objectives. Student team projects will culminate in a final competition and oral presentation. 

 

CubeSats

Introduction to spacecraft engineering. Students work in teams to design and build a small satellite following the CubeSat standard. Students will mechanically design the satellite chassis, design electrical sensors and avionics, and program the flight computer. Final demonstrations involve system integration and testing of the assembled satellite, followed by group presentations

Design of Coffee

Introduction to concepts and techniques in chemical engineering, computer-aided design, 3D printing, circuitry, mass and heat transfer, process control and machining. This class is intended to serve as a non-mathematical introduction to how engineers approach and solve problems, as elucidated by the process of roasting and brewing coffee. Various laboratory experiments test the effect of different physical and chemical processes affect the sensory qualities of coffee. The class will culminate in a competition along with a presentation to peers and other guests.

Soap Synthesis

Students will learn and use concepts and techniques in chemical engineering, computer-aided design, 3D printing, circuitry, mass and heat transfer, process control and machining. In addition, you will have the opportunity to design and perform experiments in a laboratory. You will be working in teams to design, construct and test a soap maker consisting of a batch reactor and cooling tower. The class will culminate in a competition along with a presentation to peers and other guests.

96B. Introduction to Engineering Design: Digital Imaging

Units: 2

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, one hour; outside study, four hours. Recommended for undergraduate Aerospace Engineering, Bioengineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering majors. Introduction to engineering design while building teamwork and communication skills and examination of engineering majors offered at UCLA and of engineering careers. Hands-on experience with state-of-art solid-state imaging devices. How to focus, expose, record, and manipulate telescopic images. Development of photographic technology from early chemical experiments to wide spread use of cell phone camera. Completion of hands-on engineering design projects, preparation of short report describing projects, and presentation of results. Letter grading.

96C. Introduction to Engineering Design: Internet of Things

Units: 2

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, one hour; outside study, four hours. Recommended for undergraduate Aerospace Engineering, Bioengineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering majors. Introduction to engineering design while building teamwork and communication skills and examination of engineering majors offered at UCLA and of engineering careers. Hands-on experience with state-of-art Internet of things (IoT) technology to offer students opportunity to rapidly develop innovative and inspiring systems that provide ideal introduction to computing systems and IoT applications specific to their major field. IoT technology has become one of most important advances in technology history with applications ranging from wearable devices for healthcare to residential monitoring systems, natural resource protection and management, intelligent vehicles and transportation systems, robotics systems, and energy conservation. Completion of hands-on engineering design projects, preparation of short report describing projects, and presentation of results. Letter grading.

96E. Introduction to Engineering Design: Electrocardiogram

Units: 2

Lecture, 90 minutes; laboratory, 90 minutes; outside study, three hours. Students learn and use concepts and techniques in electrical circuit design and analysis, cardiac electrophysiology, biophysics, microcontrollers, and computer programming. Students work in teams to design, construct, and test circuit boards capable of measuring human electrocardiograms by capturing data with microcontroller, with computer analysis and display. Students present their designs orally and in writing. Letter grading.

96G. Introduction to Engineering Design: Go-Karts

Units: 2

Lecture, 90 minutes; laboratory, 90 minutes; outside study, three hours. Students learn and use concepts and techniques in computer-aided design, finite element analysis, machining, electric motor performance, steering linkages, and general mechanical design and assembly to work in teams and construct and test go-karts. Students present their designs orally and in writing. Letter grading.

96R. Introduction to Engineering Design: Rockets

Units: 2

Lecture, 90 minutes; laboratory, 90 minutes; outside study, three hours. Introduction to basic concepts in aerospace engineering, computer-aided design, finite element analysis, 3D printing, carbon fiber layup, telemetry, general mechanical design and assembly, and machine shop fabrication. Concepts applied to team-based design, construction, and testing of small 3D-printed rockets and larger, high-power rockets. Students present their designs orally and in writing, and evaluate their performance against other student teams. Rockets fired from Mojave Desert launch site in class field trip. No prior experience or coursework needed. Study led by experienced undergraduate members of Bruin Rocket Project. Meetings, and design and fabrication homework, make use of Makerspace facilities and tools. Letter grading.

M101. Principles of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

Units: 4

(Same as Materials Science M105.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20B, Physics 1C. Introduction to underlying science encompassing structure, properties, and fabrication of technologically important nanoscale systems. New phenomena that emerge in very small systems (typically with feature sizes below few hundred nanometers) explained using basic concepts from physics and chemistry. Chemical, optical, and electronic properties, electron transport, structural stability, self-assembly, templated assembly and applications of various nanostructures such as quantum dots, nanoparticles, quantum wires, quantum wells and multilayers, carbon nanotubes. Letter grading.

M103. Environmental Nanotechnology: Implications and Applications

Units: 4

(Same as Civil Engineering M165.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Recommended requisite: course M101. Introduction to potential implications of nanotechnology to environmental systems as well as potential application of nanotechnology to environmental protection. Technical contents include three multidisciplinary areas: (1) physical, chemical, and biological properties of nanomaterials, (2) transport, reactivity, and toxicity of nanoscale materials in natural environmental systems, and (3) use of nanotechnology for energy and water production, plus environmental protection, monitoring, and remediation. Letter grading.

110. Introduction to Technology Management and Economics for Engineers

Units: 4

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Fundamental principles of micro-level (individual, firm, and industry) and macro-level (government, international) economics as they relate to technology management. How individuals, firms, and governments impact successful commercialization of high technology products and services. Letter grading.

111. Introduction to Finance and Marketing for Engineers

Units: 4

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Critical components of finance and marketing research and practice as they impact management of technology commercialization. Internal (within firm) and external (in marketplace) marketing and financing of high-technology innovation. Concepts include present value, future value, discounted cash flow, internal rate of return, return on assets, return on equity, return on investment, interest rates, cost of capital, and product, price, positioning, and promotion. Use of market research, segmentation, and forecasting in management of technological innovation. Letter grading.

112. Laboratory to Market, Entrepreneurship for Engineers

Units: 4

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Critical components of entrepreneurship, finance, marketing, human resources, and accounting disciplines as they impact management of technology commercialization. Topics include intellectual property management, team building, market forecasting, and entrepreneurial finance. Students work in small teams studying technology management plans to bring new technologies to market. Students select from set of available technology concepts, many generated at UCLA, that are in need of plans for movement from laboratory to market. Letter grading.

113. Product Strategy

Units: 4

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Introduction to current management concept of product development. Topics include product strategy, product platform, and product lines; competitive strategy, vectors of differentiation, product pricing, first-to-market versus fast-follower; growth strategy, growth through acquisition, and new ventures; product portfolio management. Case studies, class projects, group discussions, and guest lectures by speakers from industry. Letter grading.

160. Entrepreneurship and Venture Initiation for Engineers

Units: 4

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Focus on process and methodology for starting new venture. Introduction to entrepreneurship from perspective of entrepreneur. Examination of core concepts and frameworks on idea generation, market analysis, fundraising, corporate structures, and financial accounting for entrepreneurial endeavors. Focus on fundamentals of building business, and also emphasis on inherent experiential nature of entrepreneurship and need for constant learning on this subject. Letter grading.

163. Entrepreneurship and New Product Development for Engineers

Units: 4

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Designed to deepen understanding of innovations and innovative processes related to creating new products. Inquiry into why, what, and how of making new products. New products are essential to any business (start-up or well-established) and thriving economies. Making successful new products requires various types of innovation. Availability of digital technologies and global outsources have accelerated pace of these innovations. Letter grading.

180. Engineering of Complex Systems

Units: 4

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Designed for junior/senior engineering majors. Holistic view of engineering discipline, covering lifecycle of engineering, processes, and techniques used in industry today. Multidisciplinary systems engineering perspective in which aspects of electrical, mechanical, material, and software engineering are incorporated. Three specific case studies in communication, sensor, and processing systems included to help students understand these concepts. Special attention paid to link material covered to engineering curriculum offered by UCLA to help students integrate and enhance their understanding of knowledge already acquired. Motivation of students to continue their learning and reinforce lifelong learning habits. Letter grading.

182EW. Technology and Society

Units: 4

Lecture, four hours; discussion, three hours; outside study, five hours. Requisite: English Composition 3, and one course from Civil Engineering 110, Electrical and Computer Engineering 131A, Mathematics 170, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 174, or Statistics 100A. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 182EW, 183EW, or 185EW. Places engineering in broader societal context through examination of some of key ethical, legal, and regulatory issues and frameworks relevant to design and deployment of emerging technology products and services. Historical examination of ethical and legal frameworks generally and in relation to technology. Exploration of series of specific contemporary technology-related topics to examine their broader ramifications. Topics include driverless cars, algorithms and artificial intelligence, global supply chain for engineering products, cryptocurrencies and blockchain, net neutrality, and impact of technology on employment. Offers students tools enabling them to think more proactively and holistically about ethical and societal dimensions of their work as technology creators. Satisfies engineering writing requirement. Letter grading.

183EW. Engineering and Society

Units: 4

Lecture, four hours; discussion, three hours; outside study, five hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3E. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 185EW. Limited to sophomore/junior/senior engineering students. Professional and ethical considerations in practice of engineering. Impact of technology on society and on development of moral and ethical values. Contemporary environmental, biological, legal, and other issues created by new technologies. Emphasis on research and writing within engineering environments. Writing and revision of about 20 pages total, including two individual technical essays and one team-written research report. Readings address technical issues and writing form. Satisfies engineering writing requirement. Letter grading.

185EW. Art of Engineering Endeavors

Units: 4

Lecture, four hours; discussion, three hours; outside study, five hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3E. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 183EW. Designed for junior/senior engineering students. Nontechnical skills and experiences necessary for engineering career success. Importance of group dynamics in engineering practice. Teamwork and effective group skills in engineering environments. Organization and control of multidisciplinary complex engineering projects. Forms of leadership and qualities and characteristics of effective leaders. How engineering, computer sciences, and technology relate to major ethical and social issues. Societal demands on practice of engineering. Emphasis on research and writing in engineering environments. Satisfies engineering writing requirement. Letter grading.

188. Special Courses in Engineering

Units: 4

Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Special topics in engineering for undergraduate students taught on experimental or temporary basis, such as those taught by resident and visiting faculty members. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.

192. Fundamentals of Engineering Mentorship

Units: 2

Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Principles and practical techniques for instruction of hands-on engineering design projects in high school outreach programs. Curriculum planning, project preparation, classroom management, team collaboration, diversity awareness, fostering of group cohesion, and emergency procedures. Preparation of lessons and project for summer outreach program, with practice presentations. P/NP grading.