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Curricular Requirements & Department Information

Materials Science and Engineering

UCLA
3111 Engineering V
Box 951595
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1595

 

(310) 825-5534
fax: (310) 206-7353
http://www.seas.ucla.edu/ms/

Jenn-Ming Yang, Ph.D., Chair
Ya-Hong Xie, Ph.D., Vice Chair
Qibing Pei, Ph.D., Vice Chair

Professors

Russel E. Caflisch, Ph.D.

Yong Chen, Ph.D.

Bruce S. Dunn, Ph.D. (Nippon Sheet Glass Company Professor of Materials Science)

Nasr M. Ghoniem, Ph.D.

Mark S. Goorsky, Ph.D.

Vijay Gupta, Ph.D.

H. Thomas Hahn, Ph.D. (Raytheon Company Professor of Manufacturing Engineering)

Richard B. Kaner, Ph.D.

Qibing Pei, Ph.D.

King-Ning Tu, Ph.D

Ya-Hong Xie, Ph.D.

Jenn-Ming Yang, Ph.D.

Yang Yang, Ph.D.

Professors Emeriti

Alan J. Ardell, Ph.D.

David L. Douglass, Ph.D.

William Klement, Jr., Ph.D.

John D. Mackenzie, Ph.D. (Nippon Sheet Glass Company Professor Emeritus of Materials Science)

Kanji Ono, Ph.D.

Aly H. Shabaik, Ph.D.

George H. Sines, Ph.D.

Christian N.J. Wagner, Dr.rer.nat.

Alfred S. Yue, Ph.D.

Associate Professors

Ioanna Kakoulli, D.Phil.

Vidvuds Ozolins, Ph.D.

Benjamin M. Wu, D.D.S., Ph.D.

Assistant Professors

Yu Huang, Ph.D.

Suneel Kodambaka, Ph.D.

Adjunct Professors

Eric P. Bescher, Ph.D.

Harry Patton Gillis, Ph.D.

John J. Gilman, Ph.D.

Marek A. Przystupa, Ph.D.

Scope and Objectives

At the heart of materials science is an understanding of the microstructure of solids. “Microstructure” is used broadly in reference to solids viewed at the subatomic (electronic) and atomic levels, and the nature of the defects at these levels. The microstructure of solids at various levels profoundly influences the mechanical, electronic, chemical, and biological properties of solids. The phenomenological and mechanistic relationships between microstructure and the macroscopic properties of solids are, in essence, what materials science is all about.

Materials engineering builds on the foundation of materials science and is concerned with the design, fabrication, and optimal selection of engineering materials that must simultaneously fulfill dimensional, property, quality control, and economic requirements.

The department also has a program in electronic materials that provides a broad-based background in materials science, with opportunity to specialize in the study of those materials used for electronic and optoelectronic applications. The program incorporates several courses in electrical engineering in addition to those in the materials science curriculum.

The undergraduate program leads to the B.S. degree in Materials Engineering. Students are introduced to the basic principles of metallurgy and ceramic and polymer science as part of the department’s Materials Engineering major.

A joint major field, Chemistry/Materials Science, is offered to students enrolled in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (College of Letters and Science).

The graduate program allows for specialization in one of the following fields: ceramics and ceramic processing, electronic and optical materials, and structural materials.

Department Mission

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering faculty members, students, and alumni foster a collegial atmosphere to produce (1) highly qualified students through an educational program that cultivates excellence, (2) novel and highly innovative research that advances basic and applied knowledge in materials, and (3) effective interactions with the external community through educational outreach, industrial collaborations, and service activities.

Undergraduate Program Objectives

The Materials Engineering major at UCLA prepares undergraduate students for employment or advanced studies with industry, the national laboratories, state and federal agencies, and academia. To meet the needs of these constituencies, the objectives of the undergraduate program are to produce graduates who (1) possess a solid foundation in materials science and engineering, with emphasis on the fundamental scientific and engineering principles that govern the microstructure, properties, processing, and performance of all classes of engineering materials, (2) understand materials processes and the application of general natural science and engineering principles to the analysis and design of materials systems of current and/or future importance to society, (3) have strong skills in independent learning, analysis, and problem solving, with special emphasis on design of engineering materials and processes, communication, and an ability to work in teams, and (4) understand and are aware of the broad issues relevant to materials, including professional and ethical responsibilities, impact of materials engineering on society and environment, contemporary issues, and need for lifelong learning.

Undergraduate Study

Materials Engineering B.S.

The ABET-accredited materials engineering program is designed for students who wish to pursue a professional career in the materials field and desire a broad understanding of the relationship between microstructure and properties of materials. Metals, ceramics, and polymers, as well as the design, fabrication, and testing of metallic and other materials such as oxides, glasses, and fiber-reinforced composites, are included in the course contents.

Materials Engineering Option

Preparation for the Major

Required: Chemistry and Biochemistry 20A, 20B, 20L; Computer Science 31 (or another programming course approved by the Faculty Executive Committee); Materials Science and Engineering 10, 90L; Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B, 33A, 33B; Physics 1A, 1B, 1C (or Electrical Engineering 1).

The Major

Required: Chemical Engineering 102A (or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 105A), Civil and Environmental Engineering 101 (or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 101), 108, Electrical Engineering 100, Materials Science and Engineering 104, 110, 110L, 120, 130, 131, 131L, 132, 140, 143A, 150, 160, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 181A or 182A; two laboratory courses (4 units) from Materials Science and Engineering 121L, 141L, 143L, 161L; three technical breadth courses (12 units) selected from an approved list available in the Office of Academic and Student Affairs; and three major field elective courses (12 units) from Chemical Engineering C114, Civil and Environmental Engineering 130, 135A, Electrical Engineering 2, 123A, 123B, 124, Materials Science and Engineering 111, 121, 122, 151, 161, 162, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 156A, 166C, plus at least one elective course (4 units) from Chemistry and Biochemistry 30A, 30AL, Electrical Engineering 131A, Materials Science and Engineering 170, 171, Mathematics 170A, or Statistics 100A.

For information on University and general education requirements, see Requirements for B.S. Degrees on page 19 or http://www.registrar.ucla.edu/ge/.

Electronic Materials Option

Preparation for the Major

Required: Chemistry and Biochemistry 20A, 20B, 20L; Computer Science 31 (or another programming course approved by the Faculty Executive Committee); Electrical Engineering 10; Materials Science and Engineering 10, 90L; Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B, 33A, 33B; Physics 1A, 1B, 1C (or Electrical Engineering 1).

The Major

Required: Chemical Engineering 102A (or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 105A), Electrical Engineering 101, 121B, Materials Science and Engineering 104, 110, 110L, 120 (or Electrical Engineering 2), 121, 121L, 122, 130, 131, 131L, 140, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 101, and 181A or 182A; four courses (16 units) from Electrical Engineering 123A, 123B, Materials Science and Engineering 132, 150, 160; 4 laboratory units from Electrical Engineering 172L, Materials Science and Engineering 141L, 161L, 199; three technical breadth courses (12 units) selected from an approved list available in the Office of Academic and Student Affairs; and one major field elective course (4 units) from Electrical Engineering 110, 124, 131A, 172, Materials Science and Engineering 111, 143A, 162.

For information on University and general education requirements, see Requirements for B.S. Degrees on page 19 or http://www.registrar.ucla.edu/ge/.

Graduate Study

For information on graduate admission, see Graduate Programs, page 23.

The following introductory information is based on the 2009-10 edition of Program Requirements for UCLA Graduate Degrees. Complete annual editions of Program Requirements are available at http://www.gdnet.ucla.edu/gasaa/library/pgmrqintro.htm. Students are subject to the degree requirements as published in Program Requirements for the year in which they enter the program.

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in Materials Science and Engineering.

Materials Science and Engineering M.S.

Areas of Study

There are three main areas in the M.S. program: ceramics and ceramic processing, electronic and optical materials, and structural materials. Students may specialize in any one of the three areas, although most students are more interested in a broader education and select a variety of courses. Basically, students select courses that serve their interests best in regard to thesis research and job prospects.

Course Requirements

Thesis Plan. Nine courses are required, of which six must be graduate courses. The courses are to be selected from the following lists, although suitable substitutions can be made from other engineering disciplines or from chemistry and physics with the approval of the departmental graduate adviser. Two of the six graduate courses may be Materials Science and Engineering 598 (thesis research).

Comprehensive Examination Plan. Nine courses are required, six of which must be graduate courses, selected from the following lists with the same provisions listed under the thesis plan. The remaining three courses in the total course requirement may be upper division courses.

Ceramics and ceramic processing: Materials Science and Engineering 111, 121, 122, 143A, 151, 161, 162, 200, 201, 211, 246D, 298.

Electronic and optical materials: Materials Science and Engineering 111, 121, 122, 143A, 151, 161, 162, 200, 201, 221, 222, 223, 298.

Structural materials: Materials Science and Engineering 111, 121, 122, 143A, 151, 161, 162, 200, 201, 211, 243A, 243C, 250B, 298.

As long as a majority of the courses taken are offered by the department, substitutions may be made with the consent of the departmental graduate adviser.

Undergraduate Courses. No lower division courses may be applied toward graduate degrees. In addition, the following upper division courses are not applicable toward graduate degrees: Chemical Engineering 102A, 199; Civil and Environmental Engineering 106A, 108, 199; Computer Science M152A, 152B, M171L, 199; Electrical Engineering 100, 101, 102, 103, 110L, M116L, M171L, 199; Materials Science and Engineering 110, 120, 130, 131, 131L, 132, 140, 141L, 150, 160, 161L, 199; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 102, 103, 105A, 105D, 199.

Thesis Plan

In addition to fulfilling the course requirements, under the thesis plan students are required to write a thesis on a research topic in materials science and engineering supervised by the thesis adviser. An M.S. thesis committee composed of three departmental faculty members, including the thesis chair, reviews and approves the thesis.

Comprehensive Examination Plan

Consult the graduate adviser for details. If the comprehensive examination is failed, students may be reexamined once with the consent of the graduate adviser.

Materials Science and Engineering Ph.D.

Major Fields or Subdisciplines

Ceramics and ceramic processing, electronic and optical materials, and structural materials.

Course Requirements

There is no formal course requirement for the Ph.D. degree, and students may substitute coursework by examinations. Normally, however, students take courses to acquire the knowledge needed to satisfy the written preliminary examination requirement. In this case, a grade-point average of at least 3.33 in all courses is required, with a grade of B– or better in each course.

The basic program of study for the Ph.D. degree is built around one major field and one minor field. The major field has a scope corresponding to a body of knowledge contained in nine courses, at least six of which must be graduate courses, plus the current literature in the area of specialization. Materials Science and Engineering 599 may not be applied toward the nine-course total. The major fields named above are described in a Ph.D. major field syllabus, each of which can be obtained in the department office.

The minor field normally embraces a body of knowledge equivalent to three courses, at least two of which are graduate courses. If students fail to satisfy the minor field requirements through coursework, a minor field examination may be taken (once only). The minor field is selected to support the major field and is usually a subset of the major field.

For information on completing the Engineer degree, see Schoolwide Programs, Courses, and Faculty.

Written and Oral Qualifying Examinations

During the first year of full-time enrollment in the Ph.D. program, students take the oral preliminary examination that encompasses the body of knowledge in materials science equivalent to that expected of a bachelor’s degree. If students opt not to take courses, a written preliminary examination in the major field is required. Students may not take an examination more than twice.

After passing both preliminary examinations, students take the University Oral Qualifying Examination. The nature and content of the examination are at the discretion of the doctoral committee but ordinarily include a broad inquiry into the student’s preparation for research. The doctoral committee also reviews the prospectus of the dissertation at the oral qualifying examination.

Note: Doctoral Committees. A doctoral committee consists of a minimum of four members. Three members, including the chair, are “inside” members and must hold appointments in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at UCLA. The “outside” member must be a UCLA faculty member outside the Materials Science and Engineering Department. Faculty members holding joint appointments with the department are considered “inside” members.

Fields of Study

Ceramics and Ceramic Processing

The ceramics and ceramic processing field is designed for students interested in ceramics and glasses, including electronic materials. As in the case of metallurgy, primary and secondary fabrication processes such as vapor deposition, sintering, melt forming, or extrusion strongly influence the microstructure and properties of ceramic components used in structural, electronic, or biological applications. Formal course and research programs emphasize the coupling of processing treatments, microstructure, and properties.

Electronic and Optical Materials

The electronic and optical materials field provides an area of study in the science and technology of electronic materials that includes semiconductors, optical ceramics, and thin films (metal, dielectric, and multilayer) for electronic and optoelectronic applications.

Course offerings emphasize fundamental issues such as solid-state electronic and optical phenomena, bulk and interface thermodynamics and kinetics, and applications that include growth, processing, and characterization techniques. Active research programs address the relationship between microstructure and nanostructure and electronic/optical properties in these materials systems.

Structural Materials

The structural materials field is designed primarily to provide broad understanding of the relationships between processing, microstructure, and performance of various structural materials, including metals, intermetallics, ceramics, and composite materials. Research programs include material synthesis and processing, ion implantation-induced strengthening and toughening, mechanisms and mechanics of fatigue, fracture and creep, structure/property characterization, nondestructive evaluation, high-temperature stability, and aging of materials.

Facilities

Facilities in the Materials Science and Engineering Department include:

  • Ceramic Processing Laboratory

  • Electron Microscopy Laboratories with a scanning transmission electron microscope (100 keV), a field emission transmission electron microscope (200 keV), and a scanning electron microscope, all equipped with a full quantitative analyzer, a stereo microscope, micro-cameras, and metallurgical microscopes

  • Glass and Ceramics Research Laboratories

  • Mechanical Testing Laboratory

  • Metallographic Sample Preparation Laboratory

  • Nano-Materials Laboratory

  • Nondestructive Testing Laboratory

  • Organic Electronic Materials Processing Laboratory

  • Semiconductor and Optical Characterization Laboratory

  • Thin Film Deposition Laboratory, including molecular beam epitaxy and wafer bonders

  • X-Ray Diffraction Laboratory

  • X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy Facility

Faculty Areas of Thesis Guidance

Professors

Russel E. Caflisch, Ph.D. (New York U., 1978)

Theory and numerical simulation for materials physics, epitaxial growth, nanoscale systems, semiconductor device properties and design in applications to quantum well devices, quantum dots, nanocrystals and quantum computing

Yong Chen, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1996)

Nanoscale science and engineering, micro- and nano-fabrication, self-assembly phenomena, microscale and nanoscale electronic, mechanical, optical, biological, and sensing devices, circuits and systems

Bruce S. Dunn, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1974)

Solid electrolytes, electrical properties of ceramics and glasses, ceramic-metal bonding, optical materials

Nasr M. Ghoniem, Ph.D. (Wisconsin, 1977)

Mechanical behavior of high-temperature materials, radiation interaction with material (e.g., laser, ions, plasma, electrons, and neutrons), material processing by plasma and beam sources, physics and mechanics of material defects, fusion energy

Mark S. Goorsky, Ph.D. (MIT, 1989)

Electronic materials processing, strain relaxation in epitaxial semiconductors and device structures, high-resolution X-ray diffraction of semiconductors, ceramics, and high-strength alloys

Vijay Gupta, Ph.D. (MIT, 1989)

Experimental mechanics, fracture of engineering solids, mechanics of thin film and interfaces, failure mechanisms and characterization of composite materials, ice mechanics

H. Thomas Hahn, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State, 1971)

Nanocomposites, multifunctional composites, nanomechanics, rapid prototyping, information systems

Robert F. Hicks, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1984)

Chemical vapor deposition and atmospheric plasma processing

Richard B. Kaner, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania, 1984)

Rapid synthesis of high-temperature materials, conducting polymers as separation membranes for enantiomers, synthesis of carbon nanoscrolls and composites

Qibing Pei, Ph.D. (Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1990)

Electroactive polymers through molecular design and nano-engineering for electronic devices and artificial muscles

King-Ning Tu, Ph.D. (Harvard, 1968)

Kinetic processes in thin films, metal-silicon interfaces, electromigration, Pb-free interconnects

Ya-Hong Xie, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1986)

Hetero-epitaxial growth of semiconductor thin films: strained Si, self-assembled quantum dots, and other epitaxial nano-structures; Si substrate impedance engineering for mixed-signal integrated circuit technologies

Jenn-Ming Yang, Ph.D. (Delaware, 1986)

Mechanical behavior of polymer, metal, and ceramic matrix composites, electronics packaging

Yang Yang, Ph.D. (Massachusetts-Lowell, 1992)

Conjugated polymers and applications in optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodiodes, and field-effect transistors

Professors Emeriti

Alan J. Ardell, Ph.D. (Stanford, 1964)

Irradiation-induced precipitation, high-temperature deformation of solids, electron microscopy, physical metallurgy of aluminum/lithium alloys, precipitation hardening

David L. Douglass, Ph.D. (Ohio State, 1958)

Oxidation and sulfidation kinetics and mechanisms, materials compatibility, defect structures, diffusion

William Klement, Jr., Ph.D. (Caltech, 1962)

Phase transformations in solids, high-pressure effects on solids

John D. Mackenzie, Ph.D. (Imperial C., London, 1954)

Glass science, ceramics, electrical properties of amorphous materials, materials recycling

Kanji Ono, Ph.D. (Northwestern, 1964)

Mechanical behavior and nondestructive testing of structural materials, acoustic emission, dislocations and strengthening mechanisms, microstructural effects, and ultrasonics

Aly H. Shabaik, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1966)

Metal forming, metal cutting, mechanical properties, friction and wear, biomaterials, manufacturing processes

George H. Sines, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1953)

Fracture of ceramics, fatigue of metals, carbon-carbon composites, failure analysis

Christian N.J. Wagner, Dr.rer.nat. (U. des Saarlandes, 1957)

X-ray and neutron diffraction; structure of liquid and amorphous alloys, and plastically deformed metals; biomaterials; thin films; residual stresses

Alfred S. Yue, Ph.D. (Purdue, 1957)

Semiconductor eutectics; electronic materials for solar cell and detector applications, solidification and crystal growth

Associate Professors

Ioanna Kakoulli, D.Phil. (University of Oxford, 1999)

Chemical and physical properties of non-metallic archaeological materials; alteration processes in archaeological vitreous materials and pigments

Vidvuds Ozolins, Ph.D. (Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan, Stockholm, 1998)

Theory of materials, first-principles modeling of phase transformations in bulk and surface systems, vibrational and electronic properties

Benjamin Wu, Ph.D. (MIT, 1997)

Processing, characterization, and controlled delivery of biological molecules of bioerodible polymers; design and fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds and precursor tissue analogs; tissue-material interactions and dental biomaterials

Assistant Professors

Yu Huang, Ph.D. (Harvard, 2003)

Nano-material fabrication and development, bio-nano structures

Suneel Kodambaka, Ph.D. (Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 2002)

In situ microscopy, surface thermodynamics, kinetics of crystal growth, phase transformations and chemical reactions, thin film physics

Adjunct Professors

Eric P. Bescher, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1987)

Advanced cementitious materials, sol-gel materials, organic/inorganic hybrids

Harry Patton Gillis, Ph.D. (Chicago, 1974)

Application of surface science and chemical dynamics techniques to elucidate fundamental molecular mechanisms and optimize practical processes

John J. Gilman, Ph.D. (Columbia U., 1952)

Mechanochemistry, dislocation mobility, metallic glasses, fracture phenomena, shock and deterioration fronts, research management theory

Marek A. Przystupa, Ph.D. (Michigan Tech, 1980)

Mechanical behavior of solids

Lower Division Courses

10. Freshman Seminar: New Materials. (1)

Seminar, one hour; outside study, two hours. Preparation: high school chemistry and physics. Not open to students with credit for course 104 or former course 14. Introduction to basic concepts of materials science and new materials vital to advanced technology. Microstructural analysis and various material properties discussed in conjunction with such applications as biomedical sensors, pollution control, and microelectronics. Letter grading. Mr. Kodambaka (F)

19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars. (1)

Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

90L. Physical Measurement in Materials Engineering. (2)

Laboratory, four hours; outside study, two hours. Various physical measurement methods used in materials science and engineering. Mechanical, thermal, electrical, magnetic, and optical techniques. Letter grading. Mr. Ono (Sp)

99. Student Research Program. (1 to 2)

Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

Upper Division Courses

104. Science of Engineering Materials. (4)

(Formerly numbered 14.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20B, 20L, Physics 1A, 1B. General introduction to different types of materials used in engineering designs: metals, ceramics, plastics, and composites, relationship between structure (crystals and microstructure) and properties of technological materials. Illustration of their fundamental differences and their applications in engineering. Letter grading. Mr. Dunn (F,W,Sp)

M105. Principles of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. (4)

(Same as Engineering M101.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: Chemistry 20, and Electrical Engineering 1 or Physics 1C. Introduction to underlying science encompassing structure, properties, and fabrication of technologically important nanoscale systems. New phenomena that emerge in very small systems (typically with feature sizes below few hundred nanometers) explained using basic concepts from physics and chemistry. Chemical, optical, and electronic properties, electron transport, structural stability, self-assembly, templated assembly and applications of various nanostructures such as quantum dots, nanoparticles, quantum wires, quantum wells and multilayers, carbon nanotubes. Letter grading. Mr. Ozolins (F)

110. Introduction to Materials Characterization A (Crystal Structure, Nanostructures, and X-Ray Scattering). (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 104. Modern methods of materials characterization; fundamentals of crystallography, properties of X rays, X-ray scattering; powder method, Laue method; determination of crystal structures; phase diagram determination; high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods; X-ray spectroscopy; design of materials characterization procedures. Letter grading. Mr. Goorsky (F)

110L. Introduction to Materials Characterization A Laboratory. (2)

Laboratory, four hours; outside study, two hours. Requisite: course 104. Experimental techniques and analysis of materials through X-ray scattering techniques; powder method, crystal structure determination, high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods, and special projects. Letter grading. Mr. Goorsky (F)

111. Introduction to Materials Characterization B (Electron Microscopy). (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 104, 110. Characterization of microstructure and microchemistry of materials; transmission electron microscopy; reciprocal lattice, electron diffraction, stereographic projection, direct observation of defects in crystals, replicas; scanning electron microscopy: emissive and reflective modes; chemical analysis; electron optics of both instruments. Letter grading. Mr. Kodambaka (W)

C112. Introduction to Archaeological Materials Science: Scientific Methodologies, Techniques, and Interpretation. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Preparation: general chemistry, or inorganic and organic chemistry. Recommended requisite: course 110. Several basic scientific techniques employed for examination of archaeological and cultural artifacts to answer questions of anthropological significance and their state of preservation. Theoretical and hands-on instruction to provide fundamentals of portable/field and analytical techniques such as UV/VNIR spectrophotometry, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), and others. Examination and analysis protocols, sample preparation techniques, and methods of scientific analysis and interpretation for study of organic and inorganic materials of archaeological and cultural significance. Concurrently scheduled with course CM212. Letter grading.

120. Physics of Materials. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 104, 110 (or Chemistry 113A). Introduction to electrical, optical, and magnetic properties of solids. Free electron model, introduction to band theory and Schrödinger wave equation. Crystal bonding and lattice vibrations. Mechanisms and characterization of electrical conductivity, optical absorption, magnetic behavior, dielectrical properties, and p-n junctions. Letter grading. Mr. Y. Yang (W)

121. Materials Science of Semiconductors. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 120. Structure and properties of elemental and compound semiconductors. Electrical and optical properties, defect chemistry, and doping. Electronic materials analysis and characterization, including electrical, optical, and ion-beam techniques. Heterostructures, band-gap engineering, development of new materials for optoelectronic applications. Letter grading. Ms. Huang (Sp)

121L. Materials Science of Semiconductors Laboratory. (2)

Lecture, 30 minutes; discussion, 30 minutes; laboratory, two hours; outside study, three hours. Corequisite: course 121. Experiments conducted on materials characterization, including measurements of contact resistance, dielectric constant, and thin film biaxial modulus and CTE. Letter grading. Mr. Goorsky (Sp)

122. Principles of Electronic Materials Processing. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 104. Description of basic semiconductor materials for device processing; preparation and characterization of silicon, III-V compounds, and films. Discussion of principles of CVD, MOCVD, LPE, and MBE; metals and dielectrics. Letter grading. Mr. Goorsky (W)

130. Phase Relations in Solids. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course 104, and Chemical Engineering 102A or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 105A. Summary of thermodynamic laws, equilibrium criteria, solution thermodynamics, mass-action law, binary and ternary phase diagrams, glass transitions. Letter grading. Mr. Xie (F)

131. Diffusion and Diffusion-Controlled Reactions. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 130. Diffusion in metals and ionic solids, nucleation and growth theory; precipitation from solid solution, eutectoid decomposition, design of heat treatment processes of alloys, growth of intermediate phases, gas-solid reactions, design of oxidation-resistant alloys, recrystallization, and grain growth. Letter grading. Mr. Tu (W)

131L. Diffusion and Diffusion-Controlled Reactions Laboratory. (2)

Laboratory, two hours; outside study, four hours. Corequisite: course 131. Design of heat-treating cycles and performing experiments to study interdiffusion, growth of intermediate phases, recrystallization, and grain growth in metals. Analysis of data. Comparison of results with theory. Letter grading. Mr. Tu (W)

132. Structure and Properties of Metallic Alloys. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 131. Physical metallurgy of steels, lightweight alloys (Al and Ti), and superalloys. Strengthening mechanisms, microstructural control methods for strength and toughness improvement. Grain boundary segregation. Letter grading. Mr. J-M. Yang (Sp)

C133. Ancient and Historic Metals: Technology, Microstructure, and Corrosion. (4)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, 90 minutes. Processes of extraction, alloying, surface patination, metallic coatings, corrosion, and microstructure of ancient and historic metals. Extensive laboratory work in preparation and examination of metallic samples under microscope, as well as lectures on technology of metallic works of art. Practical instruction in metallographic microscopy. Exploration of phase and stability diagrams of common alloying systems and environments and analytical techniques appropriate for examination and characterization of metallic artifacts. Concurrently scheduled with course CM233. Letter grading.

140. Materials Selection and Engineering Design. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 132, 150, 160. Explicit guidance among myriad materials available for design in engineering. Properties and applications of steels, nonferrous alloys, polymeric, ceramic, and composite materials, coatings. Materials selection, treatment, and serviceability emphasized as part of successful design. Design projects. Letter grading. Mr. Przystupa (Sp)

141L. Computer Methods and Instrumentation in Materials Science. (2)

Laboratory, four hours. Preparation: knowledge of BASIC or C or assembly language. Limited to junior/senior Materials Science and Engineering majors. Interface and control techniques, real-time data acquisition and processing, computer-aided testing. Letter grading. Mr. Goorsky (W)

143A. Mechanical Behavior of Materials. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course 104, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 101. Plastic flow of metals under simple and combined loading, strain rate and temperature effects, dislocations, fracture, microstructural effects, mechanical and thermal treatment of steel for engineering applications. Letter grading. Mr. Przystupa (W)

143L. Mechanical Behavior Laboratory. (2)

Laboratory, four hours. Requisites: courses 90L, 143A (may be taken concurrently). Methods of characterizating mechanical behavior of various materials; elastic and plastic deformation, fracture toughness, fatigue, and creep. Letter grading. Mr. Ono

150. Introduction to Polymers. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Polymerization mechanisms, molecular weight and distribution, chemical structure and bonding, structure crystallinity, and morphology and their effects on physical properties. Glassy polymers, springy polymers, elastomers, adhesives. Fiber forming polymers, polymer processing technology, plasticiation. Letter grading. Mr. Pei (W)

151. Structure and Properties of Composite Materials. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Preparation: at least two courses from 132, 143A, 150, 160. Requisite: course 104. Relationship between structure and mechanical properties of composite materials with fiber and particulate reinforcement. Properties of fiber, matrix, and interfaces. Selection of macrostructures and material systems. Letter grading. Mr. J-M. Yang (Sp)

160. Introduction to Ceramics and Glasses. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 104, 130. Introduction to ceramics and glasses being used as important materials of engineering, processing techniques, and unique properties. Examples of design and control of properties for certain specific applications in engineering. Letter grading. Mr. Dunn (F)

161. Processing of Ceramics and Glasses. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 160. Study of processes used in fabrication of ceramics and glasses for structural applications, optics, and electronics. Processing operations, including modern techniques of powder synthesis, greenware forming, sintering, glass melting. Microstructure properties relations in ceramics. Fracture analysis and design with ceramics. Letter grading. Mr. Dunn (Not offered 2009-10)

161L. Laboratory in Ceramics. (2)

Laboratory, four hours. Requisite: course 160. Recommended corequisite: course 161. Processing of common ceramics and glasses. Attainment of specific properties through process control for engineering applications. Quantitative characterization and selection of raw materials. Slip casting and extrusion of clay bodies. Sintering of powders. Glass melting and fabrication. Determination of chemical and physical properties. Letter grading. Mr. Dunn (Sp)

162. Electronic Ceramics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: course 104, Electrical Engineering 1 (or Physics 1C). Utilization of ceramics in microelectronics; thick film and thin film resistors, capacitors, and substrates; design and processing of electronic ceramics and packaging; magnetic ceramics; ferroelectric ceramics and electro-optic devices; optical wave guide applications and designs. Letter grading. Mr. Dunn (W, odd years)

170. Engaging Elements of Communication: Oral Communication. (2)

Lecture, one hour; discussion, one hour; outside study, four hours. Comprehensive oral presentation and communication skills provided by building on strengths of individual personal styles in creation of positive interpersonal relations. Skill set prepares students for different types of academic and professional presentations for wide range of audiences. Learning environment is highly supportive and interactive as it helps students creatively develop and greatly expand effectiveness of their communication and presentation skills. Letter grading. Mr. Xie

171. Engaging Elements of Communication: Writing for Technical Community. (2)

Lecture, one hour; discussion, one hour; outside study, four hours. Comprehensive technical writing skills on subjects specific to field of materials science and engineering. Students write review term paper in selected subject field of materials science and engineering from given set of journal publications. Instruction leads students through several crucial steps, including brainstorming, choosing title, coming up with outline, concise writing of abstract, conclusion, and final polishing. Other subjects include writing style, word choices, and grammar. Letter grading. Mr. Xie

CM180. Introduction to Biomaterials. (4)

(Same as Biomedical Engineering CM180.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course 104, or Chemistry 20A, 20B, and 20L. Engineering materials used in medicine and dentistry for repair and/or restoration of damaged natural tissues. Topics include relationships between material properties, suitability to task, surface chemistry, processing and treatment methods, and biocompatibility. Concurrently scheduled with course CM280. Letter grading. Mr. Wu (W)

188. Special Courses in Materials Science and Engineering. (4)

Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Special topics in materials science and engineering for undergraduate students that are taught on experimental or temporary basis, such as those taught by resident and visiting faculty members. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.

194. Research Group Seminars: Materials Science and Engineering. (4)

Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for undergraduate students who are part of research group. Discussion of research methods and current literature in field or of research of faculty members or students. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

199. Directed Research in Materials Science and Engineering. (2 to 8)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. Occasional field trips may be arranged. May be repeated for credit with school approval. Individual contract required; enrollment petitions available in Office of Academic and Student Affairs. Letter grading. (F,W,Sp)

Graduate Courses

200. Principles of Materials Science I. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 120. Lattice dynamics and thermal properties of solids, classical and quantized free electron theory, electrons in a periodic potential, transport in semiconductors, dielectric and magnetic properties of solids. Letter grading. Mr. Y. Yang (F)

201. Principles of Materials Science II. (4)

Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: course 131. Kinetics of diffusional transformations in solids. Precipitation in solids. Nucleation theory. Theory of precipitate growth. Ostwald ripening. Spinodal decomposition. Cellular reactions. Letter grading. Mr. Tu (Sp)

210. Diffraction Methods in Science of Materials. (4)

(Formerly numbered 245C.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 110. Theory of diffraction of waves (X rays, electrons, and neutrons) in crystalline and noncrystalline materials. Long- and short-range order in crystals, structural effects of plastic deformation, solid-state transformations, arrangements of atoms in liquids and amorphous solids. Letter grading. Mr. Goorsky (Sp, odd years)

211. Electron Microscopy. (4)

(Formerly numbered 244.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 111. Essential features of electron microscopy, geometry of electron diffraction, kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction, including anomalous absorption, applications of theory to defects in crystals. Moiré fringes, direct lattice resolutions, Lorentz microscopy, laboratory applications of contrast theory. Letter grading. Mr. Kodambaka (Sp, even years)

CM212. Introduction to Archaeological Materials Science: Scientific Methodologies, Techniques, and Interpretation. (4)

(Same as Conservation M210.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Preparation: general chemistry, or inorganic and organic chemistry. Recommended requisite: course 110. Several basic scientific techniques employed for examination of archaeological and cultural artifacts to answer questions of anthropological significance and their state of preservation. Theoretical and hands-on instruction to provide fundamentals of portable/field and analytical techniques such as UV/VNIR spectrophotometry, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), and others. Examination and analysis protocols, sample preparation techniques, and methods of scientific analysis and interpretation for study of organic and inorganic materials of archaeological and cultural significance. Concurrently scheduled with course C112. Letter grading.

M213. Deterioration and Conservation of In-Situ Archaeological and Cultural Materials. (4)

(Same as Conservation M236.) Seminar, two hours; laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses M215 (or Art History M203F or Conservation M250) and M216 (or Conservation M216). Deterioration processes (both natural and man-made) of in-situ and ex-situ archaeological and cultural decorative surfaces (mainly rock art, wall paintings, polychrome sculpture, decorative architectural elements, and mosaics) and on solutions to mitigate, pacify, or arrest decay mechanisms based on preventive, passive, and remedial solutions (latter based on minimum intervention). Sessions include holistic approaches for preservation of archaeological sites; hydrology of sites; origin and damaging effects of salts; biodegradation; chemical and mechanical weathering; earthquakes, frost, flooding, and vandalism; structural repairs, grouting, cleaning, and desalination; sheltering and limited accessibility; fixing, consolidation, and protective surface treatments. Letter grading.

M215. Techniques and Materials of Archaeological and Cultural Materials: In-Situ and Ex-Situ Architectural Decorative Surfaces. (4)

(Same as Art History M203F and Conservation M250.) Seminar, two hours; laboratory, three hours. Requisite: course M216 or C112 or Conservation M210. Recommended: Conservation M215. Designed for graduate conservation and art history students. Principles of archaeological conservation of in-situ and ex-situ monumental archaeological and cultural materials, with focus on rock art, wall paintings, polychrome sculpture, decorative architectural elements, and mosaics, through study of their constituent material and techniques in context of their geographical and chronological occurrence, technological developments, physical and conservation history, and physical location. Lectures, seminars, and case-study presentations, museum and site visits, hands-on laboratory experience, and independent research that incorporates literary survey of archaeological and conservation records, scientific data, and ancient treatises. Letter grading.

M216. Science of Conservation Materials and Methods I. (4)

(Same as Conservation M216.) Seminar, one hour; laboratory, three hours. Recommended requisite: course 104. Introduction to physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of conservation materials (employed for preservation of archaeological and cultural materials) and their aging characteristics. Science and application methods of traditional organic and inorganic systems and introduction of novel technology based on biomineralization processes and nanostructured materials. Letter grading.

221. Science of Electronic Materials. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 120. Study of major physical and chemical principles affecting properties and performance of semiconductor materials. Topics include bonding, carrier statistics, band-gap engineering, optical and transport properties, novel materials systems, and characterization. Letter grading. Mr. Goorsky (Sp)

222. Growth and Processing of Electronic Materials. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 120, 130, 131. Thermodynamics and kinetics that affect semiconductor growth and device processing. Particular emphasis on fundamentals of growth (bulk and epitaxial), heteroepitaxy, implantation, oxidation. Letter grading. Mr. Goorsky (W)

223. Materials Science of Thin Films. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 120, 131. Fabrication, structure, and property correlations of thin films used in microelectronics for data and information processing. Topics include film deposition, interfacial properties, stress and strain, electromigration, phase changes and kinetics, reliability. Letter grading. Mr. Tu

224. Deposition Technologies and Their Applications. (4)

Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Designed for graduate engineering students. Deposition methods used in high-technology applications. Theory and experimental details of physical vapor deposition (PVD), chemical vapor deposition (CVD), plasma-assisted vapor deposition processes, plasma spray, electrodeposition. Applications in semiconductor, chemical, optical, mechanical, and metallurgical industries. Letter grading. Mr. Xie

225. Materials Science of Surfaces. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: course 120, Chemistry 113A. Introduction to atomic and electronic structure of surfaces. Survey of methods for determining composition and structure of surfaces and near-surface layers of solid-state materials. Emphasis on scanning probe microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, ion scattering spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Applications in microelectronics, optoelectronics, metallurgy, polymers, biological and biocompatible materials, and catalysis. Letter grading. Mr. Gillis, Mr. Goorsky (W)

226. Si-CMOS Technology: Selected Topics in Materials Science. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Recommended preparation: Electrical Engineering 221B. Requisites: courses 130, 131, 200, 221, 222. Selected topics in materials science from modern Si-CMOS technology, including technological challenges in high k/metal gate stacks, strained Si FETs, SOI and three-dimensional FETs, source/drain engineering including transient-enhanced diffusion, nonvolatile memory, and metallization for ohmic contacts. Letter grading. Mr. Xie

CM233. Ancient and Historic Metals: Technology, Microstructure, and Corrosion. (4)

(Same as Conservation M246.) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, 90 minutes. Designed for graduate conservation and materials science students. Processes of extraction, alloying, surface patination, metallic coatings, corrosion, and microstructure of ancient and historic metals. Extensive laboratory work in preparation and examination of metallic samples under microscope, as well as lectures on technology of metallic works of art. Practical instruction in metallographic microscopy. Exploration of phase and stability diagrams of common alloying systems and environments and analytical techniques appropriate for examination and characterization of metallic artifacts. Concurrently scheduled with course C133. Letter grading.

243A. Fracture of Structural Materials. (4)

Lecture, four hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, four hours. Requisite: course 143A. Engineering and scientific aspects of crack nucleation, slow crack growth, and unstable fracture. Fracture mechanics, dislocation models, fatigue, fracture in reactive environments, alloy development, fracture-safe design. Letter grading. Mr. J-M. Yang (W, even years)

243C. Dislocations and Strengthening Mechanisms in Solids. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 143A. Elastic and plastic behavior of crystals, geometry, mechanics, and interaction of dislocations, mechanisms of yielding, work hardening, and other strengthening. Letter grading. Mr. Xie (F, odd years)

246B. Structure and Properties of Glass. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 160. Structure of amorphous solids and glasses. Conditions of glass formation and theories of glass structure. Mechanical, electrical, and optical properties of glass and relationship to structure. Letter grading. Mr. Dunn (W, even years)

246D. Electronic and Optical Properties of Ceramics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 160. Principles governing electronic properties of ceramic single crystals and glasses and effects of processing and microstructure on these properties. Electronic conduction, ferroelectricity, and photochromism. Magnetic ceramics. Infrared, visible, and ultraviolet transmission. Unique application of ceramics. Letter grading. Mr. Dunn (Sp, even years)

250B. Advanced Composite Materials. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Preparation: B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering. Requisite: course 151. Fabrication methods, structure and properties of advanced composite materials. Fibers; resin-, metal-, and ceramic-matrix composites. Physical, mechanical, and nondestructive characterization techniques. Letter grading. Mr. Y. Yang (Not offered 2009-10)

251. Chemistry of Soft Materials. (4)

Lecture, four hours. Introduction to organic soft materials, including essential basic organic chemistry and polymer chemistry. Topics include three main categories of soft materials: organic molecules, synthetic polymers, and biomolecules and biomaterials. Extensive description and discussion of structure-property relationship, spectroscopic and experimental techniques, and preparation methods for various soft materials. Letter grading. Mr. Pei (F)

252. Organic Polymer Electronic Materials. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Preparation: knowledge of introductory organic chemistry and polymer science. Introduction to organic electronic materials with emphasis on materials chemistry and processing. Topics include conjugated polymers; heavily doped, highly conducting polymers; applications as processable metals and in various electrical, optical, and electrochemical devices. Synthesis of semiconductor polymers for organic light-emitting diodes, solar cells, thin-film transistors. Introduction to emerging field of organic electronics. Letter grading. Mr. Pei (F)

270. Computer Simulations of Materials. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Introduction to modern methods of computational modeling in materials science. Topics include basic statistical mechanics, classical molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo methods, with emphasis on understanding basic physical ideas and learning to design, run, and analyze computer simulations of materials. Use of examples from current literature to show how these methods can be used to study interesting phenomena in materials science. Hands-on computer experiments. Letter grading. Mr. Ozolins (F)

271. Electronic Structure of Materials. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Preparation: basic knowledge of quantum mechanics. Recommended requisite: course 200. Introduction to modern first-principles electronic structure calculations for various types of modern materials. Properties of electrons and interatomic bonding in molecules, crystals, and liquids, with emphasis on practical methods for solving Schrödinger equation and using it to calculate physical properties such as elastic constants, equilibrium structures, binding energies, vibrational frequencies, electronic band gaps and band structures, properties of defects, surfaces, interfaces, and magnetism. Extensive hands-on experience with modern density-functional theory code. Letter grading. Mr. Ozolins (W)

272. Theory of Nanomaterials. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Strongly recommended requisite: course 200. Introduction to properties and applications of nanoscale materials, with emphasis on understanding of basic principles that distinguish nanostructures (with feature size below 100 nm) from more common microstructured materials. Explanation of new phenomena that emerge only in very small systems, using simple concepts from quantum mechanics and thermodynamics. Topics include structure and electronic properties of quantum dots, wires, nanotubes, and multilayers, self-assembly on surfaces and in liquid solutions, mechanical properties of nanostructured metamaterials, molecular electronics, spin-based electronics, and proposed realizations of quantum computing. Discussion of current and future directions of this rapidly growing field using examples from modern scientific literature. Letter grading. Mr. Ozolins (F)

CM280. Introduction to Biomaterials. (4)

(Same as Biomedical Engineering CM280.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course 104, or Chemistry 20A, 20B, and 20L. Engineering materials used in medicine and dentistry for repair and/or restoration of damaged natural tissues. Topics include relationships between material properties, suitability to task, surface chemistry, processing and treatment methods, and biocompatibility. Concurrently scheduled with course CM180. Letter grading. Mr. Wu (W)

282. Exploration of Advanced Topics in Materials Science and Engineering. (2)

Lecture, one hour; discussion, one hour; outside study, four hours. Researchers from leading research institutions around world deliver lectures on advanced research topics in materials science and engineering. Student groups present summary previews of topics prior to lecture. Class discussions follow each presentation. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading. Mr. J-M. Yang

296. Seminar: Advanced Topics in Materials Science and Engineering. (2)

Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in materials science and engineering. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty members teaching course. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

298. Seminar: Engineering. (2 to 4)

Seminar, to be arranged. Limited to graduate materials science and engineering students. Seminars may be organized in advanced technical fields. If appropriate, field trips may be arranged. May be repeated with topic change. Letter grading.

375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum. (1 to 4)

Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading. (F,W,Sp)

596. Directed Individual or Tutorial Studies. (2 to 8)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate materials science and engineering students. Petition forms to request enrollment may be obtained from assistant dean, Graduate Studies. Supervised investigation of advanced technical problems. S/U grading.

597A. Preparation for M.S. Comprehensive Examination. (2 to 12)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate materials science and engineering students. Reading and preparation for M.S. comprehensive examination. S/U grading.

597B. Preparation for Ph.D. Preliminary Examinations. (2 to 16)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate materials science and engineering students. S/U grading.

597C. Preparation for Ph.D. Oral Qualifying Examination. (2 to 16)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate materials science and engineering students. Preparation for oral qualifying examination, including preliminary research on dissertation. S/U grading.

598. Research for and Preparation of M.S. Thesis. (2 to 12)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate materials science and engineering students. Supervised independent research for M.S. candidates, including thesis prospectus. S/U grading.

599. Research for and Preparation of Ph.D. Dissertation. (2 to 16)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate materials science and engineering students. Usually taken after students have been advanced to candidacy. S/U g

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