Electrical Engineering

UCLA
56-125B Engineering IV
Box 951594
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1594

tel: 310-825-2647
fax: 310-206-8495
e-mail: eechair@ea.ucla.edu
http://www.ee.ucla.edu

Gregory J. Pottie, Ph.D., Chair

C.-K. Ken Yang, Ph.D., Vice Chair, Industry Relations

Mona Jarrahi, Ph.D., Vice Chair, Graduate Affairs

Abeer A.H. Alwan, Ph.D., Vice Chair, Undergraduate Affairs

Professors

Asad A. Abidi, Ph.D. (Chancellor’s Professor)

Abeer A.H. Alwan, Ph.D.

Katsushi Arisaka, Ph.D.

M.-C. Frank Chang, Ph.D. (Wintek Endowed Professor of Electrical Engineering)

Panagiotis D. Christofides, Ph.D.

Jason (Jingsheng) Cong, Ph.D.

Babak Daneshrad, Ph.D.

Suhas N. Diggavi, Ph.D.

Christina Fragouli, Ph.D.

Warren S. Grundfest, M.D., FACS

Lei He, Ph.D.

Diana L. Huffaker, Ph.D.

Tatsuo Itoh, Ph.D. (Northrop Grumman Professor of Electrical Engineering)

Subramanian S. Iyer, Ph.D. (Charles P. Reames Endowed Professor of Electrical Engineering)

Bahram Jalali, Ph.D. (Northrop Grumman Opto-Electronic Professor of Electrical Engineering)

Chandrashekhar J. Joshi, Ph.D. (Chancellor’s Professor)

William J. Kaiser, Ph.D.

Kuo-Nan Liou, Ph.D.

Jia-Ming Liu, Ph.D. (Associate Dean)

Dejan Markovic, Ph.D.

Warren B. Mori, Ph.D.

Stanley J. Osher, Ph.D.

Aydogan Ozcan, Ph.D. (Chancellor’s Professor)

Gregory J. Pottie, Ph.D.

Yahya Rahmat-Samii, Ph.D., (Northrop Grumman Professor of Electrical Engineering/Electromagnetics)

Behzad Razavi, Ph.D. (Chancellor’s Professor)

Vwani P. Roychowdhury, Ph.D.

Izhak Rubin, Ph.D.

Henry Samueli, Ph.D.

Ali H. Sayed, Ph.D.

Stefano Soatto, Ph.D.

Jason L. Speyer, Ph.D.

Mani B. Srivastava, Ph.D.

Oscar M. Stafsudd, Ph.D.

Paulo Tabuada, Ph.D.

Lieven Vandenberghe, Ph.D.

Michaela van der Schaar, Ph.D. (Chancellor’s Professor)

John D. Villasenor, Ph.D.

Kang L. Wang, Ph.D. (Raytheon Company Professor of Electrical Engineering)

Richard D. Wesel, Ph.D., Associate Dean

Chee Wei Wong, Sc.D.

Jason C.S. Woo, Ph.D.

C.-K. Ken Yang, Ph.D.

Professors Emeriti

Frederick G. Allen, Ph.D.

Francis F. Chen, Ph.D.

Harold R. Fetterman, Ph.D.

Stephen E. Jacobsen, Ph.D.

Rajeev Jain, Ph.D.

Alan J. Laub, Ph.D.

Nhan N. Levan, Ph.D.

Dee-Son Pan, Ph.D.

C. Kumar N. Patel, Ph.D.

Frederick W. Schott, Ph.D.

Gabor C. Temes, Ph.D.

Chand R. Viswanathan, Ph.D.

Paul K.C. Wang, Ph.D.

Donald M. Wiberg, Ph.D.

Alan N. Willson, Jr., Ph.D. (Charles P. Reames Endowed Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering)

Kung Yao, Ph.D.

Associate Professors

Danijela Cabric, Ph.D.

Robert N. Candler, Ph.D.

Chi On Chui, Ph.D.

Lara Dolecek, Ph.D.

Puneet Gupta, Ph.D.

Mona Jarrahi, Ph.D.

Sudhakar Pamarti, Ph.D.

Yuanxun Ethan Wang, Ph.D.

Benjamin S. Williams, Ph.D.

Assistant Professors

Samuel Coogan, Ph.D.

Sam Emaminejad, Ph.D.

Ankur Mehta, Ph.D.

Adjunct Professors

Ezio Biglieri, Ph.D.

Dariush Divsalar, Ph.D.

Dan M. Goebel, Ph.D.

Asad M. Madni, Ph.D.

Yi-Chi Shih, Ph.D.

Ingrid M. Verbauwhede, Ph.D.

Eli Yablonovitch, Ph.D.

Adjunct Associate Professor

Keisuke Goda, Ph.D.

Adjunct Assistant Professors

Pedram Khalili Amiri, Ph.D.

Shervin Moloudi, Ph.D.

Zachary Taylor, Ph.D.

Scope and Objectives

Electrical engineers are responsible for societal revolutionary inventions such as the electrical grid, telecommunications, and automated computing and control. The profession continues to make vital contributions in many domains. To further these ends, the Department of Electrical Engineering fosters a dynamic academic environment that is committed to a tradition of excellence in teaching, research, and service and has state-of-the-art research programs and facilities in a variety of fields. Departmental faculty members are engaged in research efforts across several disciplines in order to serve the needs of industry, government, society, and the scientific community. Interactions with other disciplines are strong. Faculty members regularly conduct collaborative research projects with colleagues in the Geffen School of Medicine, Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, School of Theater, Film, and Television, and College of Letters and Science.

There are three primary research areas in the department: circuits and embedded systems, physical and wave electronics, and signals and systems. These areas cover a broad spectrum of specializations in, for example, communications and telecommunications, control systems, electromagnetics, embedded computing systems, engineering optimization, integrated circuits and systems, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), nanotechnology, photonics and optoelectronics, plasma electronics, signal processing, and solid-state electronics.

The program grants one undergraduate degree (Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering) and two graduate degrees (Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in Electrical Engineering). The graduate program provides students with an opportunity to pursue advanced coursework, in-depth training, and research investigations in several fields.

Department Mission

The education and research activities in the Electrical Engineering Department are aligned with its mission statement. In partnership with its constituents, consisting of students, alumni, industry, and faculty members, the mission of the department is to (1) produce highly qualified, well-rounded, and motivated students with fundamental knowledge of electrical engineering who can provide leadership and service to California, the nation, and the world, (2) pursue creative research and new technologies in electrical engineering and across disciplines in order to serve the needs of industry, government, society, and the scientific community, (3) develop partnerships with industrial and government agencies, (4) achieve visibility by active participation in conferences and technical and community activities, and (5) publish enduring scientific articles and books.

Undergraduate Program Objectives

The electrical engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET.

The electrical engineering curriculum provides an excellent background for either graduate study or employment. Undergraduate education in the department provides students with (1) fundamental knowledge in mathematics, physical sciences, and electrical engineering, (2) the opportunity to specialize in specific areas of interest or career aspiration, (3) intensive training in problem solving, laboratory skills, and design skills, and (4) a well-rounded education that includes communication skills, the ability to function well on a team, an appreciation for ethical behavior, and the ability to engage in lifelong learning. This education is meant to prepare students to thrive and to lead. It also prepares them to achieve the following two program educational objectives: (1) that graduates of the program have successful technical or professional careers and (2) that graduates of the program continue to learn and to adapt in a world of constantly evolving technology.

Undergraduate Study

The Electrical Engineering major is a designated capstone major. Undergraduate students complete a design course in which they integrate their knowledge of the discipline and engage in creative design within realistic and professional constraints. Students apply their knowledge and expertise gained in previous mathematics, science, and engineering coursework. Within a multidisciplinary team structure, students identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems and present their projects to the class.

Electrical Engineering B.S.

Capstone Major

The undergraduate curriculum provides all Electrical Engineering majors with preparation in the mathematical and scientific disciplines that lead to a set of courses that span the fundamentals of the discipline in the three major departmental areas of signals and systems, circuits and embedded systems, and physical wave electronics. These collectively provide an understanding of inventions of importance to society, such as the electrical grid, integrated circuits, photonic devices, automatic computation and control, and telecommunication devices and systems.

Students are encouraged to make use of their electrical engineering electives and a two-term capstone design course to pursue deeper knowledge within one of these areas according to their interests, whether for graduate study or preparation for employment. See the elective examples and suggested tracks below.

Preparation for the Major

Required: Chemistry and Biochemistry 20A; Computer Science 31, 32; Electrical Engineering 2, 3, 10, 11L, M16 (or Computer Science M51A); Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B, 33A, 33B; Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL.

The Major

Required: Electrical Engineering 101A, 102, 110, 111L, 113, 131A; six core courses selected from Computer Science 33, Electrical Engineering 101B, 115A, 121B, 132A, 133A, 141, 170A; three technical breadth courses (12 units) selected from an approved list available in the Office of Academic and Student Affairs; 12 units of major field elective courses, at least 8 of which must be upper division electrical engineering courses—the remaining 4 units may be from upper division electrical engineering courses or from another HSSEAS department; and one two-term electrical engineering capstone design course (8 units).

For information on University and general education requirements, see Requirements for B.S. Degrees on page 21 or http://www.registrar.ucla.edu/Academics/GE-Requirement.

Elective Examples

Communications Systems: Studies range from basic wave propagation to point-to-point links up to large-scale networks for both wired and wireless applications. Students might take 12 units selected from Electrical Engineering M117 (or M171L), 132A, 132B, and 133A and 8 capstone design units from 113DA/113DB or 180DA/180DB.

Control Systems and Optimization: The study of how to control a variety of systems ranging from a single physical system to continental networks, such as the electrical grid. Students might take 12 units selected from Electrical Engineering 112, 133A, 133B, 134, 141, and 142 and 8 capstone design units from 113DA/113DB or 184DA/184DB.

Electromagnetic Systems: Topics include the fundamentals of electromagnetic wave propagation in guided systems and free space, antennas, and radio systems. Students might take 12 units selected from Electrical Engineering 101B, 162A, 163A, and 163C and 8 capstone design units from 163DA/163DB or 164DA/164DB.

Embedded Computing: The study of compact systems that include collections of integrated circuits that interact with the physical world for purposes such as sensing and control in applications as diverse as appliances, automobiles, and medicine. Students might take 12 units selected from Electrical Engineering 115A, 115C, M116C, M116L, M117, and 142 and 8 capstone design units from 180DA/180DB or 183DA/183DB.

Integrated Circuits: The study of how to achieve large-scale integration of thousands to billions of computational, memory, and sensing elements in single or multichip modules. Students might take 12 units selected from Electrical Engineering 115A, 115AL, 115B, 115C, and 115E and 8 capstone design units from 164DA/164DB or 183DA/183DB.

Photonics and Plasma Electronics: The study of how to manipulate light and plasmas to create devices such as those that enable high-speed optical communication systems. Students might take 12 units selected from Electrical Engineering 170A, 170B, 170C, and M185 and 8 capstone design units from 173DA/173DB.

Signal Processing: The study of how to derive meaningful inferences from measured data, such as speech, images, or other data, after conversion from analog to digital form. Students might take 12 units selected from Electrical Engineering 114, 133A, 133B, and 134 and 8 capstone design units from 113DA/113DB.

Simulation and Data Analysis: Studies focus on applications related to the processing of big data for both analog/multimedia and digital sources. Students might take 12 units selected from Electrical Engineering 114, 131B, 132A, 133A, 133B, and 134 and 8 capstone design units from 113DA/113DB or 180DA/180DB.

Solid-State and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Devices: The study of the nanoscale and microscale devices that are the base of modern computation and sensing systems. Students might take 12 units selected from Electrical Engineering 121B, 123A, 123B, 128, and M153 and 8 capstone design units from 121DA/121DB.

Suggested Tracks

The technical breadth area requirement provides an opportunity to combine elective courses in the Electrical Engineering major with those from another HSSEAS major to produce a specialization in an interdisciplinary domain. Students are free to design a specialization in consultation with a faculty adviser.

Bioengineering and Informatics (BI) refers to the design of biomedical devices and the analysis of data derived from such devices and instruments. Students might take Chemistry and Biochemistry 20B and two courses from Bioengineering 100, C101, CM102, and 110 and/or 12 units from Computer Science CM121, Electrical Engineering 114, 133B, 134, and 176 and 8 capstone design units from 180DA/180DB.

Computer Engineering (CE) concentrates on the part of the hardware/software stack related to the design of new processors and the operation of embedded systems. Students might take a 12-unit technical breadth area in computer science such as Computer Science 111, 130, and 180 and/or 12 units of electives from Electrical Engineering 115C, M116C, M116L, M117, and 132B and 8 capstone design units from 113DA/113DB or 180DA/180DB or 183DA/183DB.

Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) refer to networked systems that include sensors and actuators that interact with the physical world. They blend embedded systems with networking and control and include, for example, robotic systems and the Internet of Things (IoT). Students might take a 12-unit technical breadth area in computer science such as Computer Science 111, M117, and 180 and/or 12 units of electives from Electrical Engineering M116C, 132B, and 142 and 8 capstone design units from 183DA/183DB.

Graduate Study

For information on graduate admission see Graduate Programs, page 24.

The following introductory information is based on the 2016-17 edition of Program Requirements for UCLA Graduate Degrees. Complete annual editions of Program Requirements are available at https://grad.ucla.edu. Students are subject to the degree requirements as published in Program Requirements for the year in which they enter the program.

The Department of Electrical Engineering offers Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in Electrical Engineering.

Electrical Engineering M.S.

Areas of Study

Students may pursue specialization across three major areas of study: (1) circuits and embedded systems, (2) physical and wave electronics, and (3) signals and systems. These areas cover a broad spectrum of specializations in, for example, communications and telecommunications, control systems, electromagnetics, embedded computing systems, engineering optimization, integrated circuits and systems, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), nanotechnology, photonics and optoelectronics, plasma electronics, signal processing, and solid-state electronics. Students must select a number of formal graduate courses to serve as their major and minor fields of study according to the requirements listed below for the thesis (seven courses) and non-thesis (eight courses) options. The selected courses must be approved by the faculty adviser.

Course Requirements

Students may select either the thesis plan or the non-thesis (comprehensive examination) plan. The selection of courses is tailored to the professional objectives of the students and must meet the requirements stated below. The courses should be selected and approved in consultation with the faculty adviser. Departures from the stated requirements are considered only in exceptional cases and must be approved by the departmental graduate adviser.

The minimum requirements for the M.S. degree are as follows:

  1. Requisite. B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering or a related field
  2. All M.S. program requirements should be completed within two academic years from admission into the M.S. graduate program in the Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science
  3. Students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 every term and 3.0 in all graduate courses
  4. Thesis Option. Students selecting the thesis option must complete at least the following requirements: (a) five formal graduate courses to serve as the major field of study, (b) two formal graduate courses to serve as the minor field of study, (c) Electrical Engineering 297, (d) two Electrical Engineering 598 courses involving work on the M.S. thesis, (e) no other 500-level courses, other seminar courses, nor Electrical Engineering 296 or 375 may be applied toward the course requirements, and (f) an M.S. thesis completed under the direction of the faculty adviser to a standard that is approved by a committee comprised of three faculty members. The thesis research must be conducted concurrently with the coursework
  5. Non-Thesis Option. Students selecting the non-thesis option must complete at least the following requirements: (a) six formal graduate courses to serve as the major field of study, (b) two formal graduate courses to serve as the minor field of study, (c) Electrical Engineering 297, (d) Electrical Engineering 299 to serve as the M.S. comprehensive examination, which is evaluated by a committee of three faculty members appointed by the department. In case of failure, students may be reexamined only once with consent of the departmental graduate adviser, and (e) no 500-level courses, other seminar courses, nor Electrical Engineering 296 or 375 may be applied toward the course requirements
  6. Students must select a number of formal graduate courses to serve as their major and minor fields of study according to the requirements listed above for the thesis (seven courses) and non-thesis (eight courses) options. The selection of the major and minor sequences of courses must be from different established tracks, or approved ad hoc tracks, or combinations thereof. The selected courses must be approved by the faculty adviser
  7. For the thesis option at least four, and for the non-thesis option five, of the formal graduate courses used to satisfy the M.S. program requirements listed above must be in the Electrical Engineering Department
  8. A formal graduate course is defined as any 200-level course, excluding seminar or tutorial courses
  9. At most one upper division undergraduate course is allowed to replace one of the formal graduate courses covering the major and minor fields of study provided that (a) the undergraduate course is not required of undergraduate students in the Electrical Engineering Department and (b) the undergraduate course is approved by the faculty adviser
  10. A track is a coherent set of courses in some general field of study. The department suggests lists of established tracks as a means to assist students in selecting their courses. Students are not required to adhere to the suggested courses in any specific track
Circuits and Embedded Systems Area Tracks
  1. Embedded Computing Track. Courses deal with the engineering of computer systems as may be applied to embedded devices used for communications, multimedia, or other such restricted purposes. Courses include Computer Science 251A, Electrical Engineering 201A, 201C, M202A, M202B, 213A, M216A
  2. Integrated Circuits Track. Courses deal with the analysis and design of analog and digital integrated circuits; architecture and integrated circuit implementations of large-scale digital processors for communications and signal processing; hardware-software codesign; and computer-aided design methodologies. Courses include Computer Science 251A, 252A, Electrical Engineering 213A, 215A through 215E, M216A, 221A, 221B
Physical and Wave Electronics Area Tracks
  1. Electromagnetics Track. Courses deal with electromagnetic theory; propagation and scattering; antenna theory and design; microwave and millimeter wave circuits; printed circuit antennas; integrated and fiber optics; microwave-optical interaction, antenna measurement, and diagnostics; numerical and asymptotic techniques; satellite and personal communication antennas; periodic structures; genetic algorithms; and optimization techniques. Courses include Electrical Engineering 221C, 260A, 260B, 261, 262, 263, 266, 270
  2. Photonics and Plasma Electronics Track. Courses deal with laser physics, optical amplification, electro-optics, acousto-optics, magneto-optics, nonlinear optics, photonic switching and modulation, ultrafast phenomena, optical fibers, integrated waveguides, photodetection, optoelectronic integrated circuits, optical microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), analog and digital signal transmission, photonics sensors, lasers in biomedicine, fundamental plasma waves and instability; interaction of microwaves and laser radiation with plasmas; plasma diagnostics; and controlled nuclear fusion. Courses include Electrical Engineering 270, 271, 272, 273, 274, 285A, 285B, M287
  3. Solid-State and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Devices Track. Courses deal with solid-state physical electronics, semiconductor device physics and design, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) design and fabrication. Courses include Electrical Engineering 221A, 221B, 221C, 222, 223, 225, M250B, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 281, 284, C287L
Signals and Systems Area Tracks
  1. Communications Systems Track. Courses deal with communication and telecommunication principles and engineering applications; channel and source coding; spread spectrum communication; cryptography; estimation and detection; algorithms and processing in communication and radar; satellite communication systems; stochastic modeling in telecommunication engineering; mobile radio engineering; and telecommunication switching, queuing system, communication networks, local-area, metropolitan-area, and wide-area computer communication networks. Courses include Electrical Engineering 205A, 210A, 230A through 230D, 231A, 231E, 232A through 232E, 238, 241A
  2. Control Systems and Optimization Track. Courses deal with state-space theory of linear systems; optimal control of deterministic linear and nonlinear systems; stochastic control; Kalman filtering; stability theory of linear and nonlinear feedback control systems; computer-aided design of control systems; optimization theory, including linear and nonlinear programming; convex optimization and engineering applications; numerical methods; nonconvex programming; associated network flow and graph problems; renewal theory; Markov chains; stochastic dynamic programming; and queuing theory. Courses include Electrical Engineering 205A, 208A, M208B, M208C, 210B, 236A, 236B, 236C, M237, M240A, 240B, M240C, 241A, M242A
  3. Signal Processing Track. Courses deal with digital signal processing theory, statistical signal processing, analysis and design of digital filters, digital speech processing, digital image processing, multirate digital signal processing, adaptive filtering, estimation theory, neural networks, and communications signal processing. Courses include Electrical Engineering 205A, 210A, 210B, 211A, 212A, 212B, 213A, M214A, 214B, M217, 238
Ad Hoc Tracks

In consultation with their faculty advisers, students may petition for an ad hoc track tailored to their professional objectives. This may comprise graduate courses from established tracks, from across areas, and even from outside electrical engineering. The petition must justify how the selection of courses in the ad hoc track forms a coherent set of courses, and how the proposed ad hoc track serves the professional objectives. The petition must be approved by the faculty adviser and the departmental graduate adviser.

Comprehensive Examination Plan

The M.S. comprehensive examination requirement is satisfied either (1) by solving a comprehensive examination problem in the final project, or equivalent, of every formal graduate electrical engineering course taken. A grade-point average of at least 3.0 in the comprehensive examination problems is required for graduation. The M.S. individual study program is administered by the academic adviser, the director of the area to which the students belong, and the vice chair of Graduate Affairs or (2) through completion of an individual study course (Electrical Engineering 299) under the direction of a faculty member. Students are assigned a topic of individual study by the faculty member. The study culminates with a written report and an oral presentation. The M.S. individual study program is administered by the faculty member directing the course, the director of the area to which the students belong, and the vice chair of Graduate Affairs. Students who fail the examination may be reexamined once with consent of the vice chair of Graduate Affairs.

Electrical Engineering Ph.D.

Areas of Study

Students may pursue specialization across three major areas of study: (1) circuits and embedded systems, (2) physical and wave electronics, and (3) signals and systems. These areas cover a broad spectrum of specializations in, for example, communications and telecommunications, control systems, electromagnetics, embedded computing systems, engineering optimization, integrated circuits and systems, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), nanotechnology, photonics and optoelectronics, plasma electronics, signal processing, and solid-state electronics.

Course Requirements

The selection of courses for the Ph.D. program is tailored to the professional objectives of the students and must meet the requirements stated below. The courses should be selected and approved in consultation with the faculty adviser. Departures from the stated requirements are considered only in exceptional cases and must be approved by the departmental graduate adviser. Normally, students take additional courses to acquire deeper and broader knowledge in preparation for the dissertation research.

The minimum requirements for the Ph.D. degree are as follows:

  1. Requisite. M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering or a related field granted by UCLA or by an institution recognized by the UCLA Graduate Division
  2. All Ph.D. program requirements should be completed within five academic years from admission into the Ph.D. graduate program in the Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science
  3. Students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.5 in the Ph.D. program
  4. Students must complete at least the following requirements: (a) four formal graduate courses selected in consultation with the faculty adviser, (b) Electrical Engineering 297, (c) one technical communications course such as Electrical Engineering 295, (d) no 500-level courses, other seminar courses, nor Electrical Engineering 296 or 375 may be applied toward the course requirements, (e) pass the Ph.D. preliminary examination which is administered by the department and takes place once every year. In case of failure, students may be reexamined only once with consent of the departmental graduate adviser, (f) pass the University Oral Qualifying Examination which is administered by the doctoral committee, (g) complete a Ph.D. dissertation under the direction of the faculty adviser, and (h) defend the Ph.D. dissertation in a public seminar with the doctoral committee
  5. A formal graduate course is defined as any 200-level course, excluding seminar or tutorial courses. Formal graduate courses taken to meet the M.S. degree requirements may not be applied toward the Ph.D. course requirements
  6. At least two of the formal graduate courses must be in electrical engineering
  7. Within two academic years from admission into the Ph.D. program, all courses should be completed and the Ph.D. preliminary examination should be passed. It is strongly recommended that students take the Ph.D. preliminary examination during their first academic year in the program
  8. The University Oral Qualifying Examination must be taken when all required courses are complete, and within one year after passing the Ph.D. preliminary examination
  9. Students admitted originally to the M.S. program in the Electrical Engineering Department must complete all M.S. program requirements with a grade-point average of at least 3.5 to be considered for admission into the Ph.D. program. Only after admission into the program can students take the Ph.D. preliminary examination
  10. Students must nominate a doctoral committee prior to taking the University Oral Qualifying Examination. A doctoral committee consists of a minimum of four members. Three members, including the chair, are inside members and must hold appointments in the department. The outside member must be a UCLA faculty member in another department. By petition, one of the four members may be a faculty member from another UC campus

Written and Oral Qualifying Examinations

The written qualifying examination is known as the Ph.D. preliminary examination in the department. The purpose of the examination is to assess student competency in the discipline, knowledge of the fundamentals, and potential for independent research. Students admitted originally to the M.S. program in the Electrical Engineering Department must complete all M.S. program requirements with a grade-point average of at least 3.5 to be considered for admission into the Ph.D. program. Only after admission into the program can students take the Ph.D. preliminary examination, which is held once every year. Students are examined independently by a group of faculty members in their general area of study. The examination by each faculty member typically includes both oral and written components, and students pass the entire Ph.D. preliminary examination and not in parts. Students who fail the examination may repeat it once only with consent of the departmental graduate adviser. The preliminary examination, together with the course requirements for the Ph.D. program, should be completed within two years from admission into the program.

After passing the written qualifying examination described above, students are ready to take the University Oral Qualifying Examination. The nature and content of the examination are at the discretion of the doctoral committee, but ordinarily include a broad inquiry into the preparation for research. The doctoral committee also reviews the prospectus of the dissertation at the oral qualifying examination.

Students must nominate a doctoral committee prior to taking the University Oral Qualifying Examination. A doctoral committee consists of a minimum of four members. Three members, including the chair, are inside members and must hold appointments in the department. The outside member must be a UCLA faculty member in another department. By petition, one of the four members may be a faculty member from another UC campus.

Facilities and Programs

Computing Resources

The department maintains a server room with several racks of computer and storage servers in addition to computing resources within individual faculty labs. The network infrastructure supports a variety of Windows, Unix, and Linux servers, workstations, and laptops. The school also offers access to a computing cluster primarily used for undergraduate and graduate teaching purposes. The campus supplies free access to a large-scale computing cluster (Hoffman2) with over 13,000 computing cores on over 1200 server nodes. Archival-class backup storage is also available through the campus.

Research Centers and Laboratories

Center for Development of Emerging Storage Systems (CoDESS)

The Center for Development of Emerging Storage Systems (CoDESS) has a dual mission: to push the frontiers of modern data storage systems through an integrated research program and to create a highly-trained workforce of graduate students. Current research thrusts include information and coding theory for ultra-reliable data storage systems, data reduction algorithms and communication methods for cloud storage, enabling technologies for future recording paradigms and storage devices, and resource-efficient signal processing techniques and architecture optimization.

Center for Engineering Economics, Learning, and Networks

The Center for Engineering Economics, Learning, and Networks will develop a new wave of ideas, technologies, networks, and systems that change the ways in which people (and devices) interact, communicate, collaborate, learn, teach, and discover. The center brings together an interdisciplinary group of researchers from diverse disciplines —including computer science, electrical engineering, economics, and mathematics—with diverse interests spanning microeconomics, machine learning, multiagent systems, artificial intelligence, optimization, and physical and social networks, all sharing a common passion: developing rigorous theoretical foundations to shape the design of future generations of networks and systems for interaction.

Center for Heterogeneous Integration and Performance Scaling (CHIPS)

UCLA Engineering has established the Center for Heterogeneous Integration and Performance Scaling (CHIPS) to address the dramatic changes taking place in the electronic hardware arena. CHIPS is an interdisciplinary, University-led consortium of industrial partners, universities, and government agencies that addresses limitations of the current application space and design environment, including integration schemes of new materials and components.

CHIPS develops new methodologies, tools, and manufacturing infrastructure for fracturing complex subsystems and dies into small, primitive dielets and then re-integrating them at pitches comparable to on-chip wiring levels, enabling both latencies and bandwidth at on-chip levels. CHIPS also applies monolithic 3D integration using wafer-to-wafer bonding for memory scaling and neuromorphic cognitive applications. The ability to hardware-synthesize extremely large and complex systems from prefabricated hard IP will reduce turnaround times from years to weeks, and costs from tens of millions to a few hundred thousand dollars. This paradigm shift will change the way systems are integrated, spur innovation, and deliver new pro-ducts significantly faster, with an associated reduced cost and extending this concept to biocompatible and flexible substrates. CHIPS also addresses issues associated with supply-chain integrity, security novel CHIPS-enabled architectures, and novel devices that can be leveraged by its methodology.

CHIPS is multidisciplinary, integrating specialties and students in diverse areas including electrical engineering, computer science, materials science, mechanical engineering, and the biosciences, with strong industry participation.

Center for High-Frequency Electronics

The Center for High-Frequency Electronics has been established with support from several governmental agencies and contributions from local industries, beginning with a $10 million grant from Hewlett-Packard.

The first major goal of the center is to combine, in a synergistic manner, five areas of research. These include (1) solid-state millimeter wave devices, (2) millimeter systems for imaging and communications, (3) millimeter wave high-power sources (gyrotrons), (4) GaAs gigabit logic systems, and (5) VLSI and LSI based on new materials and structures. The center supports work in these areas by providing the necessary advanced equipment and facilities and allows the University to play a major role in initiating and generating investigations into new electronic devices. Students, both graduate and under-graduate, receive training and instruction in a unique facility.

The second major goal of the center is to bring together the manpower and skills necessary to synthesize new areas of activity by stimulating interactions between different interdependent fields. The Electrical Engineering Department, other departments within UCLA, and local universities (such as Caltech and USC) have begun to combine and correlate certain research programs as a result of the formation of the center.

Clean Energy Research Center–Los Angeles (CERC–LA)

Lei He, Director

The Clean Energy Research Center–Los Angeles (CERC–LA) was created by UCLA to tackle many of the grand challenges related to generation, transmission, storage, and management of energy. As many energy challenges are global in nature, this center engages the participation of a multidisciplinary group of researchers from many nations. CERC–LA leads a U.S.-China clean energy and climate change research consortium. CERC–LA, together with the China National Center for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation (NCSC), Peking University (PKU), and Fudan University, was selected by the U.S. Department of State and the China National Development and Reform Commission as a U.S.-China EcoPartner. CERC–LA plans to have satellite offices in other cities including Shanghai and Beijing.

Circuits Laboratories

The Circuits Laboratories are equipped for measurements on high-speed analog and digital circuits and are used for the experimental study of communication, signal processing, and instrumentation systems. A hybrid integrated circuit facility is available for rapid mounting, testing, and revision of miniature circuits. These include both discrete components and integrated circuit chips. The laboratory is available to advanced undergraduate and graduate students through faculty sponsorship on thesis topics, research grants, or special studies.

Electromagnetics Laboratories

The Electromagnetics Laboratories involve the disciplines of microwaves, millimeter waves, wireless electronics, and electromechanics. Students enrolled in microwave laboratory courses, such as Electrical Engineering 163DA and 164DB, special projects classes such as Electrical Engineering 199, and/or research projects, have the opportunity to obtain experimental and design experience in the following technology areas: integrated microwave circuits and antennas, integrated millimeter wave circuits and an-tennas, numerical visualization of electromagnetic waves, electromagnetic scattering and radar cross-section measurements, and antenna near field and diagnostics measurements.

Integrated Modeling Process and Computation for Technology (IMPACT+) Center

The Integrated Modeling Process and Computation for Technology (IMPACT+) Center research team—with its strengths spanning patterning, devices, algorithms, modeling, and design automation—plans to address future semiconductor technology challenges through two intertwined themes: process and device, and design interface. This industry-supported, cross-university center involves more than 12 semiconductor companies and three University of California campuses.

Nanoelectronics Research Facility

The state-of-the-art Nanoelectronics Re-search Facility (NRF) for graduate research and teaching, as well as the undergraduate microelectronics teaching laboratory, are housed in an 8,500-square-foot class 100/class 1000 clean room with a full complement of utilities, including high-purity deionized water, high-purity nitrogen, and exhaust scrubbers. The NRF supports research on nanometer-scale fabrication and on the study of fundamental quantum size effects, as well as exploration of innovative nano-meter-scale device concepts. The laboratory also supports many other schoolwide programs in device fabrication, such as MEMS and optoelectronics. For more information, see http://www.nanolab.ucla.edu.

Photonics and Optoelectronics Laboratories

Students in the Laser Laboratory study the properties of lasers and gain an understanding of the application of this modern technology to optics, communication, and holography.

The Photonics and Optoelectronics Laboratories include facilities for research in all of the basic areas of quantum electronics. Specific areas of experimental investigation include high-powered lasers, nonlinear optical processes, ultrafast lasers, parametric frequency conversion, electro-optics, infrared detection, and semiconductor lasers and detectors. Operating lasers include mode-locked and Q-switched Nd:YAG and Nd:YLF lasers, Ti:Al2O3 lasers, ultraviolet and visible wavelength argon lasers, wavelength-tunable dye lasers, as well as gallium arsenide, helium-neon, excimer, and high-powered continuous and pulsed carbon dioxide laser systems. Also available are equipment and facilities for research on semiconductor lasers, fiber optics, nonlinear optics, and ultrashort laser pulses. These laboratories are open to undergraduate and graduate students who have faculty sponsorship for their thesis projects or special studies.

Plasma Electronics Facilities

Two laboratories are dedicated to the study of the effects of intense laser radiation on matter in the plasma state. One, located in Engineering IV, houses a state-of-the-art table top terawatt (T3) 400fs laser system that can be operated in either a single or dual frequency mode for laser-plasma interaction studies. Diagnostic equipment includes a ruby laser scattering system, a streak camera, and optical spectrographs and multichannel analyzer. Parametric instabilities such as stimulated Raman scattering have been studied, as well as the resonant excitation of plasma waves by optical mixing. The second laboratory, located in Boelter Hall, houses the MARS laser, currently the largest on-campus university CO2 laser in the U.S. It can produce 200J, 170ps pulses of CO2 radiation, focusable to 1016 W/cm2. The laser is used for testing new ideas for laser-driven particle accelerators and free-electron lasers. Several high-pressure, short-pulse drivers can be used on the MARS; other equipment includes a theta-pinch plasma generator, an electron linac injector, and electron detectors and analyzers.

A second group of laboratories is dedicated to basic research in plasma sources for basic experiments, plasma processing, and plasma heating.

There is also a large computing cluster called DAWSON 2 that is dedicated to the study of plasma-based acceleration, inertial fusion energy, and high energy density plasma science. DAWSON 2 consists of 96 HP L390 nodes each with 12 Intel X5650 CPUs and 48 GB of RAM, and three Nvidia M2070s GPUs and 18 GB of Global Memory (for a total of 1152 CPUs and 288 GPUs) connected by a non-blocking QDR Infiniband network with 160TB of parallel storage from Panasas. Peak system performance is approximately 300TF/150TF (single/double precision) with a measured linpack performance of 68.1TF (double precision). DAWSON 2 is housed within the UCLA Institute for Digital Research Engineering data center.

Solid-State Electronics Facilities

Solid-state electronics equipment and facilities include a modern integrated semiconductor device processing laboratory, complete new Si and III-V compound molecular beam epitaxy systems, CAD and mask-making facilities, lasers for beam crystallization study, thin film and characterization equipment, deep-level transient spectroscopy instruments, computerized capacitance-voltage and other characterization equipment, including doping density profiling systems, low-temperature facilities for material and device physics studies in cryogenic temperatures, optical equipment, including many different types of lasers for optical characterization of superlattice and quantum well devices, and characterization equipment for high-speed devices, including high magnetic field facilities for magnetotransport measurement of heterostructures. The laboratory facilities are available to faculty, staff, and graduate students for their research.

Wireless Health Institute (WHI)

Benjamin M. Wu, Director
Bruce Dobkin, William Kaiser, Majid Sarrafzadeh, Co-Directors

WHI is leading initiatives in health care solutions in the fields of disease diagnosis, neurological rehabilitation, optimization of clinical outcomes for many disease conditions, geriatric care, and many others. WHI also promotes this new field in the international community through the founding and organization of the leading Wireless Health conference series, Wireless Health 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014.

WHI technology always serves the clinician community through jointly developed innovations and clinical trial validation. Each WHI program is focused on large-scale product delivery in cooperation with manufacturing partners. WHI collaborators include the UCLA schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Engineering and Applied Sciences; Clinical Translational Science Institute for medical research; Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center; and faculty from many departments across UCLA. WHI education programs span high school, undergraduate, and graduate students, and provide training in end-to-end product development and delivery for WHI program managers.

WHI develops innovative, wearable biomedical monitoring systems that collect, integrate, process, analyze, communicate, and present information so that individuals become engaged and empowered in their own health care, improve their quality of life, and reduce burdens on caregivers. WHI products appear in diverse areas including motion sensing, wound care, orthopaedics, digestive health and process monitoring, advancing athletic performance, and many others. Clinical trials validating WHI technology are underway at 10 institutions. WHI products developed by the UCLA team are now in the marketplace in the U.S. and Europe. Physicians, nurses, therapists, other providers, and families can apply these technologies in hospital and community practices. Academic and industry groups can leverage the organization of WHI to rapidly develop products in complete-care programs and validate in trials. WHI welcomes new team members and continuously forms new collaborations with colleagues and organizations in medical science and health care delivery.

Multidisciplinary Research Facilities

The department is also associated with several multidisciplinary research centers including

Faculty Groups and Laboratories

Department faculty members also lead a broad range of research groups and laboratories that cover a wide spectrum of specialties, including

Faculty Areas of Thesis Guidance

Professors

Asad A. Abidi, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1981)

High-performance analog electronics, device modeling

Abeer A.H. Alwan, Ph.D. (MIT, 1992)

Speech processing, acoustic properties of speech sounds with applications to speech synthesis, recognition by machine and coding, hearing-aid design, and digital signal processing

Katsushi Arisaka, Ph.D. (U. Tokyo, Japan, 1985)

High energy and astro-particle experiments

M.-C. Frank Chang, Ph.D. (National Chiao-Tung U., Taiwan, 1979)

High-speed semiconductor (GaAs, InP, and Si) devices and integrated circuits for digital, analog, microwave, and optoelectronic integrated circuit applications

Panagiotis D. Christofides, Ph.D. (U. Minnesota, 1996)

Process modeling, dynamics and control, computational and applied mathematics

Jason (Jingsheng) Cong, Ph.D. (U. Illinois, 1990)

Computer-aided design of VLSI circuits, fault-tolerant design of VLSI systems, design and analysis of algorithms, computer architecture, reconfigurable computing, design for nano-technologies

Babak Daneshrad, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1993)

Digital VLSI circuits: wireless communication systems, high-performance communications integrated circuits for wireless applications

Suhas Diggavi, Ph.D. (Stanford, 1999)

Wireless communication, information theory, wireless networks, data compression, signal processing

Christina Fragouli, Ph.D. (UCLA, 2000)

Network coding, algorithms for networking, wireless networks and network security

Warren S. Grundfest, M.D., FACS (Columbia, 1980)

Development of lasers for medical applications, minimally invasive surgery, magnetic resonance-guided interventional procedures, laser lithotripsy, microendoscopy, spectroscopy, photodynamic therapy (PDT), optical technology, biologic feedback control mechanisms

Lei He, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1999)

Computer-aided design of VLSI circuits and systems, coarse-grain programmable systems and field programmable gate array (FPGA), high-performance interconnect modeling and design, power-efficient computer architectures and systems, numerical and combinatorial optimization

Diana L. Huffaker, Ph.D. (U. Texas Austin, 1995)

Solid-state nanotechnology, MWIR optoelectronic devices, solar cells, Si photonics, novel materials

Tatsuo Itoh, Ph.D. (U. Illinois Urbana, 1969)

Microwave and millimeter wave electronics; guided wave structures; low-power wireless electronics; integrated passive components and antennas; photonic bandgap structures and meta materials applications; active integrated antennas, smart antennas; RF technologies for reconfigurable front-ends; sensors and transponders

Subramanian S. Iyer, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1981)

Heterogeneous system integration and scaling, advanced packaging and 3D integration, technologies and techniques for memory subsystem integration and neuromorphic computing

Bahram Jalali, Ph.D. (Columbia, 1989)

RF photonics, integrated optics, fiber optic integrated circuits

Chandrashekhar J. Joshi, Ph.D. (Hull U., England, 1978)

Laser fusion, laser acceleration of particles, nonlinear optics, high-power lasers, plasma physics

William J. Kaiser, Ph.D. (Wayne State, 1983)

Research and development of new microsensor and microinstrument technology for industry, science, and biomedical applications; development and applications of new atomic-resolution scanning probe microscopy methods for microelectronic device research

Kuo-Nan Liou, Ph.D. (New York U., 1971)

Radiative transfer, remote sensing of clouds and aerosols and climate/clouds-aerosols research

Jia-Ming Liu, Ph.D. (Harvard, 1982)

Nonlinear optics, ultrafast optics, laser chaos, semiconductor lasers, optoelectronics, photonics, nonlinear and ultrafast processes

Dejan Markovic, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 2006)

Power/area-efficient digital integrated circuits, VLSI architectures for wireless communications, organization methods and supporting CAD flows

Warren B. Mori, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1987)

Laser and charged particle beam-plasma interactions, advanced accelerator concepts, advanced light sources, laser-fusion, high-energy density science, high-performance computing, plasma physics

Stanley J. Osher, Ph.D. (New York U., 1966)

Scientific computing, applied mathematics

Aydogan Ozcan, Ph.D. (Stanford, 2005)

Bioimaging, nano-photonics, nonlinear optics

Gregory J. Pottie, Ph.D. (McMaster U., Canada, 1988)

Communication systems and theory with applications to wireless sensor networks

Yahya Rahmat-Samii, Ph.D. (U. Illinois, 1975)

Satellite communications antennas, personal communication antennas including human interactions, antennas for remote sensing and radio astronomy applications, advanced numerical and genetic optimization techniques in electromagnetics, frequency selective surfaces and photonic band gap structures, novel integrated and fractal antennas, near-field antenna measurements and diagnostic techniques, electromagnetic theory

Behzad Razavi, Ph.D. (Stanford, 1992)

Analog, RF, and mixed-signal integrated circuit design, dual-standard RF transceivers, phase-locked systems and frequency synthesizers, A/D and D/A converters, high-speed data communication circuits

Vwani P. Roychowdhury, Ph.D. (Stanford, 1989)

Models of computation including parallel and distributed processing systems, quantum computation and information processing, circuits and computing paradigms for nano-electronics and molecular electronics, adaptive and learning algorithms, nonparametric methods and algorithms for large-scale information processing, combinatorics and complexity, and information theory

Izhak Rubin, Ph.D. (Princeton, 1970)

Telecommunications and computer communications systems and networks, mobile wireless networks, multimedia IP networks, UAV/UGV-aided networks, integrated system and network management, C4ISR systems and networks, optical networks, network simulations and analysis, traffic modeling and engineering

Henry Samueli, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1980)

VLSI implementation of signal processing and digital communication systems, high-speed digital integrated circuits, digital filter design

Ali H. Sayed, Ph.D. (Stanford, 1992)

Adaptive systems, statistical and digital signal processing, estimation theory, signal processing for communications, linear system theory, interplays between signal processing and control methodologies, fast algorithms for large-scale problems

Stefano Soatto, Ph.D. (Caltech, 1996)

Computer vision, systems and control theory, detection and estimation, robotics, system identification, shape analysis, motion analysis, image processing, video processing, autonomous systems

Jason L. Speyer, Ph.D. (Harvard, 1968)

Stochastic and deterministic optimal control and estimation with application to aerospace systems; guidance, flight control, and flight mechanics

Mani B. Srivastava, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1992)

Wireless networking, embedded computing, networked embedded systems, sensor networks, mobile and ubiquitous computing, low-power and power-aware systems

Oscar M. Stafsudd, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1967)

Quantum electronics: I.R. lasers and nonlinear optics; solid-state: I.R. detectors

Paulo Tabuada, Ph.D. (Technical U. Lisbon, Portugal, 2002)

Real-time, networked, embedded control systems; mathematical systems theory including discrete-event, timed, and hybrid systems; geometric nonlinear control; algebraic/categorical methods

Lieven Vandenberghe, Ph.D. (Katholieke U. Leuven, Belgium, 1992)

Optimization in engineering and applications in systems and control, circuit design, and signal processing

Mihaela van der Schaar, Ph.D. (Eindhoven U. Technology, Netherlands, 2001)

Multimedia processing and compression, multimedia networking, multimedia communications, multimedia architectures, enterprise multimedia streaming, mobile and ubiquitous computing

John D. Villasenor, Ph.D. (Stanford, 1989)

Communications, signal and image processing, configurable computing systems, and design environments

Kang L. Wang, Ph.D. (MIT, 1970)

Nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, nano and molecular devices, MBE and superlattices, microwave and millimeter electronics, quantum information

Richard D. Wesel, Ph.D. (Stanford, 1996)

Communication theory and signal processing with particular interests in channel coding, including turbo codes and trellis codes, joint algorithms for distributed communication and detection

Chee Wei Wong, Sc.D. (MIT, 2003)

Ultrafast and nonlinear optics, quantum communications and computing, chip-scale optoelectronics, precision measurements and sensing

Jason C.S. Woo, Ph.D. (Stanford, 1987)

Solid-state technology, CMOS and bipolar device/circuit optimization, novel device design, modeling of integrated circuits, VLSI fabrication

C.-K. Ken Yang, Ph.D. (Stanford, 1998)

High-performance VLSI design, digital and mixed-signal circuit design

Professors Emeriti

Frederick G. Allen, Ph.D. (Harvard, 1956)

Semiconductor physics, solid-state devices, surface physics

Francis F. Chen, Ph.D. (Harvard, 1954)

Radio frequency plasma sources and diagnostics for semiconductor processing

Harold R. Fetterman, Ph.D. (Cornell, 1968)

Optical millimeter wave interactions, high-frequency optical polymer modulators and applications, solid-state millimeter wave structures and systems, biomedical applications of lasers

Stephen E. Jacobsen, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1968)

Operations research, mathematical programming, nonconvex programming, applications of mathematical programming to engineering and engineering/economic systems

Rajeev Jain, Ph.D. (Katholieke U. Leuven, Belgium, 1985)

Design of digital communications and digital signal processing circuits and systems

Alan Laub, Ph.D. (U. Minnesota, 1974)

Numerical linear algebra, numerical analysis, condition estimation, computer-aided control system design, high-performance computing

Nhan N. Levan, Ph.D. (Monash U., Australia, 1966)

Control systems, stability and stabilizability, errors in dynamic systems, signal analysis, wavelets, theory and applications

Dee-Son Pan, Ph.D. (Caltech, 1977)

New semiconductor devices for millimeter and RF power generation and amplification, transport in small geometry semiconductor devices, generic device modeling

C. Kumar N. Patel, Ph.D. (Stanford, 1961)1

Quantum electronics; nonlinear optics; photoacoustics in gases, liquids, and solids; ultra-low level detection of trace gases; chemical and toxic gas sensors

Frederick W. Schott, Ph.D. (Stanford, 1949)

Electromagnetics, applied electromagnetics

Gabor C. Temes, Ph.D. (U. Ottawa, 1961)

Analog MOS integrated circuits, signal processing, analog and digital filters

Chand R. Viswanathan, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1964)

Semiconductor electronics: VLSI devices and technology, thin oxides; reliability and failure physics of MOS devices; process-induced damage, low-frequency noise

Paul K.C. Wang, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1960)

Control systems, modeling and control of nonlinear distributed-parameter systems with applications to micro-opto-electromechanical systems, micro and nano manipulation systems, coordination and control of multiple microspacecraft in formation

Donald M. Wiberg, Ph.D. (Caltech, 1965)2

Identification and control, especially of aerospace, biomedical, mechanical, and nuclear processes, modeling and simulation of respiratory and cardiovascular systems

Alan N. Willson, Jr., Ph.D. (Syracuse, 1967)

Theory and application of digital signal processing including VLSI implementations, digital filter design, nonlinear circuit theory

Kung Yao, Ph.D. (Princeton, 1965)

Communication theory, signal and array processing, sensor system, wireless communication systems, VLSI and systolic algorithms

Associate Professors

Danijela Cabric, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 2007)

Wireless communications system design, cognitive radio networks, VLSI architectures of signal processing and digital communication algorithms, performance analysis and experiments on embedded system platforms

Robert N. Candler, Ph.D. (Stanford, 2006)

MEMS and nanoscale devices, fundamental limitations of sensors, packaging, biological and chemical sensing

Chi On Chui, Ph.D. (Stanford, 2004)

Nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices and technology, heterostructure semiconductor devices, monolithic integration of heterogeneous technology, exploratory nanotechnology

Lara Dolecek, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 2007)

Information and coding theory, graphical models, statistical algorithms and computational methods with applications to large-scale and complex systems for data processing, communication and storage

Puneet Gupta, Ph.D. (UC San Diego, 2007)

CAD for VLSI design and manufacturing, physical design, manufacturing-aware circuits and layouts, design-aware manufacturing

Mona Jarrahi, Ph.D. (Stanford, 2007)

Radio frequency (RF), microwave, millimeter-wave, and terahertz circuits, high-frequency devices and circuits, integrated photonics and optoelectronics

Sudhakar Pamarti, Ph.D. (UC San Diego, 2003)

Mixed-signal IC design, signal processing and communication theory

Yuanxun Ethan Wang, Ph.D. (U. Texas Austin, 1999)

Smart antennas, RF and microwave power amplifiers, numerical techniques, DSP techniques for microwave systems, phased arrays, wireless and radar systems, microwave integrated circuits

Benjamin Williams, Ph.D. (MIT, 2003)

Development of terahertz quantum cascade lasers

Assistant Professors

Samuel Coogan, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 2015)

Control theory and dynamical systems, formal methods, cyber-physical systems

Sam Emaminejad, Ph.D. (Stanford, 2014)

Biological and chemical sensors, wearable and flexible electronics, MEMS and NEMS fabrication microfluidics, internet of things devices, technology development for personalized/precision medicine

Ankur Mehta, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 2012)

Robotics and electromechanical systems design, fabrication, and control; wireless sensor networks hardware and applications; systems integration

Adjunct Professors

Ezio Biglieri, Dr. Ing. (Politecnico di Torino, Italy, 1967)

Digital communication, wireless channels, modulation, error-control coding, signal processing in telecommunications

Dariush Divsalar, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1978)

Information theory, communication theory, bandwidth-efficient combined coding modulation techniques, spread spectrum systems and mutual user interference cancellation for CDMA, turbo codes, binary and nonbinary LDPC codes, iterative decoding

Dan M. Goebel, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1981)

Electric propulsion, high-efficiency ion and Hall thrusters, cathodes, high-voltage engineering, microwave devices and microwave communications, pulsed power

Asad M. Madni, Ph.D. (California Coast U., 1987)

Development and commercialization of intelligent sensors and systems, RF and microwave instrumentation, signal processing

Yi-Chi Shih, Ph.D. (U. Texas Austin, 1982)

Microwave/millimeter-wave active and passive devices, characterization and modeling, integrated circuits, components and subsystems for sensors and communications applications

Ingrid M. Verbauwhede, Ph.D. (Katholieke U. Leuven, Belgium, 1991)

Embedded systems, VLSI, architecture and circuit design and design methodologies for applications in security, wireless communications and signal processing

Eli Yablonovitch, Ph.D. (Harvard, 1972)

Optoelectronics, high-speed optical communications, photonic integrated circuits, photonic crystals, plasmonic optics and plasmonic circuits, quantum computing and communication

Adjunct Associate Professor

Keisuke Goda, Ph.D. (MIT, 2007)

Biophotonics, imaging, fiber-optic communications

Adjunct Assistant Professors

Pedram Khalili Amiri, Ph.D. (Delft U. Technology, Netherlands, 2008)

Nanoelectronics, spintronics, nano-magnetism and nonvolatile memory and logic

Shervin Moloudi, Ph.D. (UCLA, 2008)

Telecommunication analog and high-frequency circuit design

Zachary Taylor, Ph.D. (UCSB, 2009)

Biomedical optics, imaging system design, novel contrast-generation mechanisms

Lower Division Courses

2. Physics for Electrical Engineers. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisite: Physics 1C. Introduction to concepts of modern physics necessary to understand solid-state devices, including elementary quantum theory, Fermi energies, and concepts of electrons in solids. Discussion of electrical properties of semiconductors leading to operation of junction devices. Letter grading. Mr. Jalali, Mr. Williams (F,W,Sp)

2H. Physics for Electrical Engineers (Honors). (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisite: Physics 1C. Honors course parallel to course 2. Letter grading. Mr. Williams (W)

3. Introduction to Electrical Engineering. (4)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: Physics 1B. Introduction to field of electrical engineering. Basic circuits techniques with application to explanation of electrical engineering inventions such as telecommunications, electrical grid, automatic computing and control, and enabling device technology. Research frontiers of electrical engineering. Introduction to measurement and design of electrical circuits. Letter grading. Mr. Pottie (F,Sp)

10. Circuit Theory I. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course 3 (or Computer Science 1 or Materials Science 10), Mathematics 33A, Physics 1B. Corequisites: course 11L (enforced only for Computer Science and Engineering and Electrical Engineering majors), Mathematics 33B. Introduction to linear circuit analysis. Resistive circuits, capacitors, inductors and ideal transformers, Kirchhoff laws, node and loop analysis, first-order circuits, second-order circuits, Thevenin and Norton theorem, sinusoidal steady state. Letter grading. Mr. Pamarti (F,W)

10H. Circuit Theory I (Honors). (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course 3 (or Computer Science 1 or Materials Science 10), Mathematics 33A, Physics 1B. Corequisites: course 11L (enforced only for Computer Science and Engineering and Electrical Engineering majors), Mathematics 33B. Honors course parallel to course 10. Letter grading. Mr. Pamarti (Sp)

11L. Circuits Laboratory I. (1)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, one hour; outside study, one hour. Enforced corequisite: course 10. Experiments with basic circuits containing resistors, capacitors, inductors, and transformers. Ohm’s law voltage and current division, Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits, superposition, transient and steady state analysis. Letter grading. Mr. Gupta, Mr. Pamarti (F,W,Sp)

M16. Logic Design of Digital Systems. (4)

(Same as Computer Science M51A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Introduction to digital systems. Specification and implementation of combinational and sequential systems. Standard logic modules and programmable logic arrays. Specification and implementation of algorithmic systems: data and control sections. Number systems and arithmetic algorithms. Error control codes for digital information. Letter grading. Ms. Cabric, Mr. Srivastava (F,W,Sp)

19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars. (1)

Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

89. Honors Seminars. (1)

Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

99. Student Research Program. (1 to 2)

Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

Upper Division Courses

100. Electrical and Electronic Circuits. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: Mathematics 33A, 33B, Physics 1C. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 110. Electrical quantities, linear circuit elements, circuit principles, signal waveforms, transient and steady state circuit behavior, semiconductor diodes and transistors, small signal models, and operational amplifiers. Letter grading. Mr. Razavi (F,W,Sp)

101A. Engineering Electromagnetics. (4)

(Formerly numbered 101.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Mathematics 32A and 32B, or 33A and 33B, Physics 1C. Electromagnetic field concepts, waves and phasors, transmission lines and Smith chart, transient responses, vector analysis, introduction to Maxwell equations, static and quasi-static electric and magnetic fields. Letter grading. Mr. Joshi, Mr. Williams (F,W)

101B. Electromagnetic Waves. (4)

(Formerly numbered 161.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 101A. Time-varying fields and Maxwell equations, plane wave propagation and interaction with media, energy flow and Poynting vector, guided waves in waveguides, phase and group velocity, radiation and antennas. Letter grading. Mr. Y.E. Wang (W)

102. Systems and Signals. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: Mathematics 33A. Corequisite: Mathematics 33B. Elements of differential equations, first- and second-order equations, variation of parameters method and method of undetermined coefficients, existence and uniqueness. Systems: input/output description, linearity, time-invariance, and causality. Impulse response functions, superposition and convolution integrals. Laplace transforms and system functions. Fourier series and transforms. Frequency responses, responses of systems to periodic signals. Sampling theorem. Letter grading. Ms. Cabric (F,W,Sp)

110. Circuit Theory II. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 10, M16 (or Computer Science M51A), 102. Corequisite: course 111L (enforced only for Computer Science and Engineering and Electrical Engineering majors). Sinusoidal excitation and phasors, AC steady state analysis, AC steady state power, network functions, poles and zeros, frequency response, mutual inductance, ideal transformer, application of Laplace transforms to circuit analysis. Letter grading. Mr. Abidi, Mr. Razavi (W,Sp)

110L. Circuit Measurements Laboratory. (2)

Laboratory, four hours; outside study, two hours. Requisite: course 100 or 110. Experiments with basic circuits containing resistors, capacitors, inductors, and op-amps. Ohm’s law voltage and current division, Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits, superposition, transient and steady state analysis, and frequency response principles. Letter grading. Mr. Abidi, Mr. Razavi (F,W,Sp)

111L. Circuits Laboratory II. (1)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, one hour; outside study, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 10, 11L. Enforced corequisite: course 110. Experiments with electrical circuits containing resistors, capacitors, inductors, transformers, and op-amps. Steady state power analysis, frequency response principles, op-amp-based circuit synthesis, and two-port network principles. Letter grading. Mr. Gupta, Mr. Pamarti (W,Sp)

112. Introduction to Power Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 110. Complete overview of organization and operation of interconnected power systems. Development of appropriate models for interconnected power systems and learning how to perform power flow, economic dispatch, and short circuit analysis. Introduction to power system transient dynamics. Letter grading. Mr. Tabuada (Not offered 2016-17)

113. Digital Signal Processing. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 102. Relationship between continuous-time and discrete-time signals. Z-transform. Discrete Fourier transform. Fast Fourier transform. Structures for digital filtering. Introduction to digital filter design techniques. Letter grading. Ms. Alwan, Ms. van der Schaar (F,Sp)

113DA-113DB. Digital Signal Processing Design. (4-4)

Real-time implementation of digital signal processing algorithms on digital processor chips. Experiments involving A/D and D/A conversion, aliasing, digital filtering, sinusoidal oscillators, Fourier transforms, and finite wordlength effects. Course project involving original design and implementation of signal processing systems for communications, speech, audio, or video using DSP chip. 113DA. (Formerly numbered 113D.) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, six hours. Enforced requisite: course 113. In progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 113DB). 113DB. Laboratory, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 113, 113DA. Completion of projects begun in course 113DA. Letter grading. Mr. Daneshrad (113DA in F,W; 113DB in W,Sp)

114. Speech and Image Processing Systems Design. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours; outside study, six hours. Enforced requisite: course 113. Design principles of speech and image processing systems. Speech production, analysis, and modeling in first half of course; design techniques for image enhancement, filtering, and transformation in second half. Lectures supplemented by laboratory implementation of speech and image processing tasks. Letter grading. Ms. Alwan, Mr. Villasenor (F)

115A. Analog Electronic Circuits I. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 110. Review of physics and operation of diodes and bipolar and MOS transistors. Equivalent circuits and models of semiconductor devices. Analysis and design of single-stage amplifiers. DC biasing circuits. Small-signal analysis. Operational amplifier systems. Letter grading. Mr. Abidi, Mr. Daneshrad (F,Sp)

115AL. Analog Electronics Laboratory I. (2)

Laboratory, four hours; outside study, two hours. Enforced requisites: courses 110L or 111L, 115A. Experimental determination of device characteristics, resistive diode circuits, single-stage amplifiers, compound transistor stages, effect of feedback on single-stage amplifiers, operational amplifiers, and operational amplifier circuits. Introduction to hands-on design experience based on individual student hardware design and implementation platforms. Letter grading. Mr. Abidi (F,W,Sp)

115B. Analog Electronic Circuits II. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 115A. Analysis and design of differential amplifiers in bipolar and CMOS technologies. Current mirrors and active loads. Frequency response of amplifiers. Feedback and its properties. Stability issues and frequency compensation. Letter grading. Mr. Abidi, Mr. Yang (W)

115C. Digital Electronic Circuits. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: course 115A, Computer Science M51A. Recommended: course 115B. Transistor-level digital circuit analysis and design. Modern logic families (static CMOS, pass-transistor, dynamic logic), integrated circuit (IC) layout, digital circuits (logic gates, flipflops/latches, counters, etc.), computer-aided simulation of digital circuits. Letter grading. Mr. Markovic (F,W)

115E. Design Studies in Electronic Circuits. (4)

(Formerly numbered 115D.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 115B. Description of process of circuit design through lectures to complement other laboratory-based design courses. Topics vary by instructor and include communication circuits, power electronics, and instrumentation and measurement and may entail simulation-based design projects. Emphasis throughout on design-oriented analysis and rigorous approach to practical circuit design. Letter grading. Mr. Abidi (Sp)

M116C. Computer Systems Architecture. (4)

(Same as Computer Science M151B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Enforced requisites: course M16 or Computer Science M51A, Computer Science 33. Recommended: course M116L or Computer Science M152A, Computer Science 111. Computer system organization and design, implementation of CPU datapath and control, instruction set design, memory hierarchy (caches, main memory, virtual memory) organization and management, input/output subsystems (bus structures, interrupts, DMA), performance evaluation, pipelined processors. Letter grading. Mr. Gupta (F,W,Sp)

M116L. Introductory Digital Design Laboratory. (2)

(Same as Computer Science M152A.) Laboratory, four hours; outside study, two hours. Enforced requisite: course M16 or Computer Science M51A. Hands-on design, implementation, and debugging of digital logic circuits, use of computer-aided design tools for schematic capture and simulation, implementation of complex circuits using programmed array logic, design projects. Letter grading. Mr. He (F,W,Sp)

M117. Computer Networks: Physical Layer. (4)

(Same as Computer Science M117.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, six hours. Not open to students with credit for course M171L. Introduction to fundamental computer communication concepts underlying and supporting modern networks, with focus on wireless communications and media access layers of network protocol stack. Systems include wireless LANs (IEEE802.11) and ad hoc wireless and personal area networks (e.g., Bluetooth, ZigBee). Experimental project based on mobile radio-equipped devices (smart phones, tablets, etc.) as sensor platforms for personal applications such as wireless health, positioning, and environment awareness, and experimental laboratory sessions included. Letter grading. Mr. Jalali (F,W,Sp)

121B. Principles of Semiconductor Device Design. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 2. Introduction to principles of operation of bipolar and MOS transistors, equivalent circuits, high-frequency behavior, voltage limitations. Letter grading. Mr. Woo (F,W)

121DA-121DB. Semiconductor Processing and Device Design. (4-4)

Design fabrication and characterization of p-n junction and transistors. Students perform various processing tasks such as wafer preparation, oxidation, diffusion, metallization, and photolithography. Introduction to CAD tools used in integrated circuit processing and device design. Device structure optimization tool based on MEDICI; process integration tool based on SUPREM. Course familiarizes students with those tools. Using CAD tools, CMOS process integration to be designed. 121DA. (Formerly numbered 121L.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, four hours. Enforced requisite or corequisite: course 121B. In progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 121DB). 121DB. (Formerly numbered 129D.) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, six hours. Enforced requisites: courses 121B, 121DA. Letter grading. Mr. Chui (121DA in W; 121DB in Sp)

123A. Fundamentals of Solid-State I. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 2 or Physics 1C. Limited to junior/senior engineering majors. Fundamentals of solid-state, introduction to quantum mechanics and quantum statistics applied to solid-state. Crystal structure, energy levels in solids, and band theory and semiconductor properties. Letter grading. Ms. Huffaker (F)

123B. Fundamentals of Solid-State II. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 123A. Discussion of solid-state properties, lattice vibrations, thermal properties, dielectric, magnetic, and superconducting properties. Letter grading. Ms. Huffaker (W)

128. Principles of Nanoelectronics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, four hours; outside study, four hours. Requisite: Physics 1C. Introduction to fundamentals of nanoscience for electronics nanosystems. Principles of fundamental quantities: electron charge, effective mass, Bohr magneton, and spin, as well as theoretical approaches. From these nanoscale components, discussion of basic behaviors of nanosystems such as analysis of dynamics, variability, and noise, contrasted with those of scaled CMOS. Incorporation of design project in which students are challenged to design electronics nanosystems. Letter grading. Mr. K.L. Wang (Sp)

131A. Probability and Statistics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, 10 hours. Requisites: course 102 (enforced), Mathematics 32B, 33B. Introduction to basic concepts of probability, including random variables and vectors, distributions and densities, moments, characteristic functions, and limit theorems. Applications to communication, control, and signal processing. Introduction to computer simulation and generation of random events. Letter grading. Mr. Roychowdhury (F,W)

131B. Introduction to Stochastic Processes. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 131A. Introduction to concepts of stochastic processes, emphasizing continuous- and discrete-time stationary processes, correlation function and spectral density, linear transformation, and mean-square estimation. Applications to communication, control, and signal processing. Introduction to computer simulation and analysis of stochastic processes. Letter grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

132A. Introduction to Communication Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: courses 102, 113, 131A. Review of basic probability, basics of hypothesis testing, sufficient statistics and waveform communication, signal-design tradeoffs for digital communications, basics of error control coding, intersymbol interference channels and orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM), basics of wireless communications. Letter grading. Mr. Diggavi, Mr. Villasenor (W,Sp)

132B. Data Communications and Telecommunication Networks. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 131A. Layered communications architectures. Queueing system modeling and analysis. Error control, flow and congestion control. Packet switching, circuit switching, and routing. Network performance analysis and design. Multiple-access communications: TDMA, FDMA, polling, random access. Local, metropolitan, wide area, integrated services networks. Letter grading. Mr. Rubin (F)

133A. Applied Numerical Computing. (4)

(Formerly numbered 103.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: course 131A, and Civil Engineering M20 or Computer Science 31 or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M20. Introduction to numerical computing/analysis; analytic formulations versus numerical solutions; floating-point representations and rounding errors. Review of MATLAB; mathematical software. Linear equations; LU factorization; bounds on error; iterative methods for solving linear equations; conditioning and stability; complexity. Interpolation and approximation; splines. Zeros and roots of nonlinear equations. Linear least squares and orthogonal (QR) factorization; statistical interpretation. Numerical optimization; Newton method; nonlinear least squares. Numerical quadrature. Solving ordinary differential equations. Eigenvalues and singular values; QR algorithm; statistical applications. Letter grading. Mr. Vandenberghe (F,Sp)

133B. Simulation, Optimization, and Data Analysis. (4)

(Formerly numbered 136.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 133A. Simulation of dynamical systems. Algorithms for ordinary differential and difference equations. Fourier analysis; fast Fourier transforms. Random number generators. Simulation of stochastic systems, Monte Carlo methods. Constrained optimization; applications of optimization to engineering design, modeling, and data analysis. Introduction to data mining and machine learning. Algorithms and complexity. Integration of mathematical software in applications. Letter grading. Mr. Vandenberghe (Not offered 2016-17)

134. Graph Theory in Engineering. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Basics of graph theory, including trees, bipartite graphs and matching, vertex and edge coloring, planar graphs and networks. Emphasis on reducing real-world engineering problems to graph theory formulations. Letter grading. Ms. Fragouli (Not offered 2016-17)

141. Principles of Feedback Control. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 102. Mathematical modeling of physical control systems in form of differential equations and transfer functions. Design problems, system performance indices of feedback control systems via classical techniques, root-locus and frequency-domain methods. Computer-aided solution of design problems from real world. Letter grading. Mr. Tabuada (W,Sp)

142. Linear Systems: State-Space Approach. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 102. State-space methods of linear system analysis and synthesis, with application to problems in networks, control, and system modeling. Letter grading. Mr. Tabuada (Not offered 2016-17)

M153. Introduction to Microscale and Nanoscale Manufacturing. (4)

(Same as Bioengineering M153, Chemical Engineering M153, and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M183B.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, five hours. Enforced requisites: Chemistry 20A, Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL. Introduction to general manufacturing methods, mechanisms, constrains, and microfabrication and nanofabrication. Focus on concepts, physics, and instruments of various microfabrication and nanofabrication techniques that have been broadly applied in industry and academia, including various photolithography technologies, physical and chemical deposition methods, and physical and chemical etching methods. Hands-on experience for fabricating microstructures and nanostructures in modern cleanroom environment. Letter grading. Mr. Chiou (F,Sp)

162A. Wireless Communication Links and Antennas. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Enforced requisite: course 101B. Basic properties of transmitting and receiving antennas and antenna arrays. Array synthesis. Adaptive arrays. Friis transmission formula, radar equations. Cell-site and mobile antennas, bandwidth budget. Noise in communication systems (transmission lines, antennas, atmospheric, etc.). Cell-site and mobile antennas, cell coverage for signal and traffic, interference, multipath fading, ray bending, and other propagation phenomena. Letter grading. Mr. Rahmat-Samii (Sp)

163A. Introductory Microwave Circuits. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 101B. Transmission lines description of waveguides, impedance matching techniques, power dividers, directional couplers, active devices, transistor amplifier design. Letter grading. Mr. Itoh (F)

163C. Introduction to Microwave Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 101B. Theory and design of modern microwave systems such as satellite communication systems, radar systems, wireless sensors, and biological applications of microwaves. Letter grading. Mr. Itoh, Mr. Jalali (Not offered 2016-17)

163DA. Microwave and Wireless Design I. (4)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 101A, 101B. Course 163DA is enforced requisite to 163DB. Limited to senior Electrical Engineering majors. Capstone design course, with emphasis on transmission line-based circuits and components to address need in industry and research community for students with microwave and wireless circuit design experiences. Standard design procedure for waveguide and transmission line-based microwave circuits and systems to gain experience in using Microwave CAD software such as Agilent ADS or HFSS. How to fabricate and test these designs, In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 163DB). Mr. Itoh, Mr. Y.E. Wang (W)

163DB. Microwave and Wireless Design II. (4)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 101A, 101B, 163DA. Limited to senior Electrical Engineering majors. Design of radio frequency circuits and systems, with emphasis on both theoretical foundations and hands-on experience. Design of radio frequency transceivers and their building blocks according to given specifications or in form of open-ended problems. Introduction to advanced topics related to projects through lecture and laboratories. Creation by students of end-to-end systems in application context, managing trade-offs across subsystems while meeting constraints and optimizing metrics related to cost, performance, ease of use, manufacturability, testing, and other real-world issues. Oral and written presentations of project results required. Letter grading. Mr. Itoh, Mr. Y.E. Wang (Sp)

164DA-164DB. Radio Frequency Design Project I, II. (4-4)

(Formerly numbered 164D.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 115B. Course 164DA is enforced requisite to 164DB. Limited to senior Electrical Engineering majors. Design of radio frequency circuits and systems, with emphasis on both theoretical foundations and hands-on experience. Design of radio frequency transceivers and their building blocks according to given specifications or in form of open-ended problems. Introduction to advanced topics related to projects through lecture and laboratories. Creation by students of end-to-end systems in application context, managing trade-offs across subsystems while meeting constraints and optimizing metrics related to cost, performance, ease of use, manufacturability, testing, and other real-world issues. Oral and written presentations of project results required. In Progress (164DA) and letter (164DB) grading. Mr. Chang, Mr. Itoh, Mr. Razavi (Not offered 2016-17)

170A. Principles of Photonics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; recitation, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: courses 2, 101A. Development of solid foundation on essential principles of photonics from ground up with minimum prior knowledge on this subject. Topics include optical properties of materials, optical wave propagation and modes, optical interferometers and resonators, optical coupling and modulation, optical absorption and emission, principles of lasers and light-emitting diodes, and optical detection. Letter grading. Mr. Liu (F,W)

170B. Photonic Devices and Circuits. (4)

Lecture, four hours; recitation, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 170A. Coverage of core knowledge of practical photonic devices and circuits. Topics include optical waveguides, optical fibers, optical couplers, optical modulators, lasers and light-emitting diodes, optical detectors, and integrated photonic devices and circuits. Letter grading. Mr. Liu (W)

170C. Photonic Sensors and Solar Cells. (4)

Lecture, four hours; recitation, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 101A. Recommended: courses 2, 170A. Fundamentals of detection of light for communication and sensing, as well as conversion of light to electrical energy in solar cells. Introduction to radiometry, semiconductor photodetectors, noise processes and figures of merit, thermal detectors, and photovoltaic solar cells of various types and materials. Letter grading. Mr. Williams (Sp)

M171L. Data Communication Systems Laboratory. (2 to 4)

(Same as Computer Science M171L.) Laboratory, four to eight hours; outside study, two to four hours. Recommended preparation: course M116L. Limited to seniors. Not open to students with credit for course M117. Interpretation of analog-signaling aspects of digital systems and data communications through experience in using contemporary test instruments to generate and display signals in relevant laboratory setups. Use of oscilloscopes, pulse and function generators, baseband spectrum analyzers, desktop computers, terminals, modems, PCs, and workstations in experiments on pulse transmission impairments, waveforms and their spectra, modem and terminal characteristics, and interfaces. Letter grading. Mr. Jalali (Sp)

173DA-173DB. Photonics and Communication Design. (4-4)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours; outside study, eight hours. Introduction to measurement of basic photonic devices, including LEDs, lasers, detectors, and amplifiers; fiber-optic fundamentals and measurement of fiber systems. Modulation techniques, including A.M., F.M., phase and suppressed carrier methods. Possible projects include lasers, optical communication, and biomedical imaging and sensing. 173DA. (Formerly numbered 173D.) Enforced requisite: course 101A. Recommended: course 170A or Bioengineering C170. Choice of project preliminary design. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 173DB). 173DB. Enforced requisites: courses 101A, 173DA. Finalization of design and testing of projects begun in course 173DA. Letter grading. Mr. Stafsudd (173DA in W; 173DB in Sp)

176. Photonics in Biomedical Applications. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 101A. Study of different types of optical systems and their physics background. Examination of their roles in current and projected biomedical applications. Specific capabilities of photonics to be related to each example. Letter grading. Mr. Ozcan (Sp)

180DA-180DB. Systems Design. (4-4)

Limited to senior Electrical Engineering majors. Advanced systems design integrating communications, control, and signal processing subsystems. Introduction to advanced topics related to projects through lecture and laboratories. Open-ended projects vary each offering. Student teams create high-performance designs that manage trade-offs among subsystem components, including cost, performance, ease of use, and other real-world constraints. Oral and written presentation of project results. 180DA. (Formerly numbered 180D.) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, six hours. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 180DB). 180DB. Laboratory, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 180DA. Completion of projects begun in course 180DA. Letter grading. Mr. Kaiser, Mr. Pottie
(180DA in F,W; 180DB in W,Sp)

CM182. Science, Technology, and Public Policy. (4)

(Same as Public Policy CM182.) Lecture, three hours. Recent and continuing advances in science and technology are raising profoundly important public policy issues. Consideration of selection of critical policy issues, each of which has substantial ethical, social, economic, political, scientific, and technological aspects. Concurrently scheduled with course CM282. Letter grading. Mr. Villasenor (Not offered 2016-17)

183DA-183DB. Design of Specialized Digital Hardware I, II (4-4)

Limited to senior Electrical Engineering majors. Design of specialized hardware functions in system-on-chip application processor context with integration of diverse processing technologies such as general-purpose processors, graphics processors, and energy-efficient domain-specific accelerators. Design of logic gates, their size and voltage optimization for energy-delay trade-offs, operation of clocked-storage elements and their timing parameters, timing analysis of digital data-path logic, architecture parallelism and time multiplexing, clock and power. Introduction to advanced project-related topics. Open-ended projects vary annually. Student teams create hardware accelerator engines for various applications. 183DA. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: courses M16 (or Computer Science M51A), 115A. Recommended: course 115B. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 183DB). 183DB. Laboratory, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 183DA. Recommended: course 115B. Letter grading. Mr. Markovic (183DA in W; 183DB in Sp)

184DA-184DB. Independent Group Project Design. (2-2)

Laboratory, five hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses M16, 110, 110L. Course 184DA is enforced requisite to 184DB. Courses centered on group project that runs year long to give students intensive experience on hardware design, microcontroller programming, and project coordination. Several projects based on autonomous robots that traverse small mazes and courses offered yearly and target regional competitions. Students may submit proposals that are evaluated and approved by faculty members. Topics include sensing circuits and amplifier-based design, microcontroller programming, feedback control, actuation, and motor control. In Progress (184DA) and letter (184DB) grading. Mr. Briggs (Not offered 2016-17)

M185. Introduction to Plasma Electronics. (4)

(Same as Physics M122.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 101A or Physics 110A. Senior-level introductory course on electrodynamics of ionized gases and applications to materials processing, generation of coherent radiation and particle beams, and renewable energy sources. Letter grading. Mr. Mori (F)

188. Special Courses in Electrical Engineering. (4)

Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Special topics in electrical engineering for undergraduate students taught on experimental or temporary basis, such as those taught by resident and visiting faculty members. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.

189. Advanced Honors Seminars. (1)

Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to undergraduate lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

194. Research Group Seminars: Electrical Engineering. (2 to 4)

Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for undergraduate students who are part of research group. Discussion of research methods and current literature in field. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading. (F)

199. Directed Research in Electrical Engineering. (2 to 8)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be repeated for credit with school approval. Individual contract required; enrollment petitions available in Office of Academic and Student Affairs. Letter grading. (F,W,Sp)

Graduate Courses

201A. VLSI Design Automation. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 115C. Fundamentals of design automation of VLSI circuits and systems, including introduction to circuit and system platforms such as field programmable gate arrays and multicore systems; high-level synthesis, logic synthesis, and technology mapping; physical design; and testing and verification. Letter grading. Mr. Gupta (W)

201C. Modeling of VLSI Circuits and Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 115C. Detailed study of VLSI circuit and system models considering performance, signal integrity, power and thermal effects, reliability, and manufacturability. Discussion of principles of modeling and optimization codevelopment. Letter grading. Mr. He (Sp)

201D. Design in Nanoscale Technologies. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 115C. Challenges of digital circuit design and layout in deeply scaled technologies, with focus on design-manufacturing interactions. Summary of large-scale digital design flow; basic manufacturing flow; lithographic patterning, resolution enhancement, and mask preparation; yield and variation modeling; circuit reliability and aging issues; design rules and their origins; layout design for manufacturing; test structures and process control; circuit ans architecture methods for variability mitigation. Letter grading. Mr. Gupta (Sp)

M202A. Embedded Systems. (4)

(Same as Computer Science M213A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for graduate computer science and electrical engineering students. Methodologies and technologies for design of embedded systems. Topics include hardware and software platforms for embedded systems, techniques for modeling and specification of system behavior, software organization, real-time operating system scheduling, real-time communication and packet scheduling, low-power battery and energy-aware system design, timing synchronization, fault tolerance and debugging, and techniques for hardware and software architecture optimization. Theoretical foundations as well as practical design methods. Letter grading. Mr. Srivastava (F)

M202B. Energy-Aware Computing and Cyber-Physical Systems. (4)

(Same as Computer Science M213B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M16 or Computer Science M51A. Recommended: course M116C or Computer Science M151B, and Computer Science 111. System-level management and cross-layer methods for power and energy consumption in computing and communication at various scales ranging across embedded, mobile, personal, enterprise, and data-center scale. Computing, networking, sensing, and control technologies and algorithms for improving energy sustainability in human-cyber-physical systems. Topics include modeling of energy consumption, energy sources, and energy storage; dynamic power management; power-performance scaling and energy proportionality; duty-cycling; power-aware scheduling; low-power protocols; battery modeling and management; thermal management; sensing of power consumption. Letter grading. Mr. Srivastava (W)

202C. Networked Embedded Systems Design. (4)

Lecture, four hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, four hours. Designed for graduate computer science and electrical engineering students. Training in combination of networked embedded systems design combining embedded hardware platform, embedded operating system, and hardware/software interface. Essential graduate student background for research and industry career paths in wireless devices for applications ranging from conventional wireless mobile devices to new area of wireless health. Laboratory design modules and course projects based on state-of-art embedded hardware platform. Letter grading. Mr. Kaiser (F)

205A. Matrix Analysis for Scientists and Engineers. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Preparation: one undergraduate linear algebra course. Designed for first-year graduate students in all branches of engineering, science, and related disciplines. Introduction to matrix theory and linear algebra, language in which virtually all of modern science and engineering is conducted. Review of matrices taught in undergraduate courses and introduction to graduate-level topics. Letter grading. Ms. Dolecek (F,W)

M206. Machine Perception. (4)

(Same as Computer Science M268.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Designed for graduate students. Computational aspects of processing visual and other sensory information. Unified treatment of early vision in man and machine. Integration of symbolic and iconic representations in process of image segmentation. Computing multimodal sensory information by neural-net architectures. Letter grading. Mr. Soatto (F)

208A. Analytical Methods of Engineering I. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Limited to graduate students. Application of techniques of linear algebra to engineering problems. Vector spaces: scalar products, Cauchy/Schwarz inequality. Gram/Schmidt orthogonalization. Matrices as linear transformations: eigenvalues and spectrum. Self-adjoint and covariance matrices. Square root and factorization, Cholesky decomposition. Determinants, Cayley/Hamilton theorem. Minimal polynomials, Bezout theorem. Polar and singular value decomposition. Sequences, convergence, and matrix exponential. Applications to problems in signal processing, communications, and control. Letter grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

M208B. Functional Analysis for Applied Mathematics and Engineering. (4)

(Same as Mathematics M268A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: course 208A (or Mathematics 115A and 115B), Mathematics 131A, 131B, 132. Topics may include L^{p} spaces, Hilbert, Banach, and separable spaces; Fourier transforms; linear functionals. Riesz representation theory, linear operators and their adjoints; self-adjoint and compact operators. Spectral theory. Differential operators such as Laplacian and eigenvalue problems. Resolvent distributions and Green’s functions. Semigroups. Applications. S/U or letter grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

M208C. Topics in Functional Analysis for Applied Mathematics and Engineering. (4)

(Same as Mathematics M268B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M208B. Semigroups of linear operators over Hilbert spaces; generator and resolvent, generation theorems, Laplace inversion formula. Dissipative operators and contraction semigroups. Analytic semigroups and spectral representation. Semigroups with compact resolvents. Parabolic and hyperbolic systems. Controllability and stabilizability. Spectral theory of differential operators, PDEs, generalized functions. S/U or letter grading.
(Not offered 2016-17)

209AS. Special Topics in Circuits and Embedded Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Special topics in one or more aspects of circuits and embedded systems, such as digital, analog, mixed-signal, and radio frequency integrated circuits (RF ICs); electronic design automation; wireless communication circuits and systems; embedded processor architectures; embedded software; distributed sensor and actuator networks; robotics; and embedded security. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading. Ms. Cabric (F,Sp)

209BS. Seminar: Circuits and Embedded Systems. (2 to 4)

Seminar, two to four hours; outside study, four to eight hours. Seminars and discussions on current and advanced topics in one or more aspects of circuits and embedded systems, such as digital, analog, mixed-signal, and radio frequency integrated circuits (RF ICs); electronic design automation; wireless communication circuits and systems; embedded processor architectures; embedded software; distributed sensor and actuator networks; robotics; and embedded security. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U grading. Ms. Cabric (Not offered 2016-17)

210A. Adaptation and Learning. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Preparation: prior training in probability theory, random processes, and linear algebra. Recommended requisites: courses 205A, 241A. Mean-square-error estimation and filters, least-squares estimation and filters, steepest-descent algorithms, stochastic-gradient algorithms, convergence, stability, tracking, and performance, algorithms for adaptation and learning, adaptive filters, learning and classification, optimization. Letter grading. Mr. Sayed (W)

210B. Inference over Networks. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Preparation: prior training in probability theory, random processes, linear algebra, and adaptation. Enforced requisite: course 210A. Adaptation, learning, estimation, and detection over networks. Steepest-descent algorithms, stochastic-gradient algorithms, convergence, stability, tracking, and performance analyses. Distributed optimization. Online and distributed adaptation and learning. Synchronous and asynchronous network behavior. Incremental, consensus, diffusion, and gossip strategies. Letter grading. Mr. Sayed (Not offered 2016-17)

211A. Digital Image Processing I. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, five hours. Preparation: computer programming experience. Requisite: course 113. Fundamentals of digital image processing theory and techniques. Topics include two-dimensional linear system theory, image transforms, and enhancement. Concepts covered in lecture applied in computer laboratory assignments. Letter grading. Mr. Villasenor (W)

212A. Theory and Design of Digital Filters. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 113. Approximation of filter specifications. Use of design charts. Structures for recursive digital filters. FIR filter design techniques. Comparison of IIR and FIR structures. Implementation of digital filters. Limit cycles. Overflow oscillations. Discrete random signals. Wave digital filters. Letter grading. Mr. Pamarti (F)

212B. Multirate Systems and Filter Banks. (4)

Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: course 212A. Fundamentals of multirate systems; polyphase representation; multistage implementations; applications of multirate systems; maximally decimated filter banks; perfect reconstruction systems; paraunitary filter banks; wavelet transform and its relation to multirate filter banks. Letter grading. Mr. Pamarti (Not offered 2016-17)

213A. Advanced Digital Signal Processing Circuit Design. (4)

Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: course 212A. Digital filter design and optimization tools, architectures for digital signal processing circuits; integrated circuit modules for digital signal processing; programmable signal processors; CAD tools and cell libraries for application-specific integrated circuit design; case studies of speech and image processing circuits. Letter grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

M214A. Digital Speech Processing. (4)

(Same as Bioengineering M214A.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 113. Theory and applications of digital processing of speech signals. Mathematical models of human speech production and perception mechanisms, speech analysis/synthesis. Techniques include linear prediction, filter-bank models, and homomorphic filtering. Applications to speech synthesis, automatic recognition, and hearing aids. Letter grading. Ms. Alwan (W)

214B. Advanced Topics in Speech Processing. (4)

Lecture, three hours; computer assignments, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course M214A. Advanced techniques used in various speech-processing applications, with focus on speech recognition by humans and machine. Physiology and psychoacoustics of human perception. Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) and Hidden Markov Models (HMM) for automatic speech recognition systems, pattern classification, and search algorithms. Aids for hearing impaired. Letter grading. Ms. Alwan (Sp)

215A. Analog Integrated Circuit Design. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 115B. Analysis and design of analog integrated circuits. MOS and bipolar device structures and models, single-stage and differential amplifiers, noise, feedback, operational amplifiers, offset and distortion, sampling devices and discrete-time circuits, bandgap references. Letter grading. Mr. Abidi, Mr. Razavi (F)

215B. Advanced Digital Integrated Circuits. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 115C, M216A. Analysis and comparison of modern logic families. VLSI memories (SRAM, DRAM, and ROMs). Accuracy of various simulation models and simulation methods for digital circuits. Letter grading. Mr. Yang (W)

215C. Analysis and Design of RF Circuits and Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 215A. Principles of RF circuit and system design, with emphasis on monolithic implementation in VLSI technologies. Basic concepts, communications background, transceiver architectures, low-noise amplifiers and mixers, oscillators, frequency synthesizers, power amplifiers. Letter grading. Mr. Abidi, Mr. Razavi (Sp)

215D. Analog Microsystem Design. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 215A. Analysis and design of data conversion interfaces and filters. Sampling circuits and architectures, D/A conversion techniques, A/D converter architectures, building blocks, precision techniques, discrete- and continuous-time filters. Letter grading. Mr. Abidi, Mr. Razavi (Sp)

215E. Signaling and Synchronization. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 215A, M216A. Analysis and design of circuits for synchronization and communication for VLSI systems. Use of both digital and analog design techniques to improve data rate of electronics between functional blocks, chips, and systems. Advanced clocking methodologies, phase-locked loop design for clock generation, and high-performance wire-line transmitters, receivers, and timing recovery circuits. Letter grading. Mr. Pamarti (Sp)

M216A. Design of VLSI Circuits and Systems. (4)

(Same as Computer Science M258A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, two hours. Requisites: courses M16 or Computer Science M51A, and 115A. Recommended: course 115C. LSI/VLSI design and application in computer systems. Fundamental design techniques that can be used to implement complex integrated systems on chips. Letter grading. Mr. Markovic (F)

216B. VLSI Signal Processing. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Advanced concepts in VLSI signal processing, with emphasis on architecture design and optimization within block-based description that can be mapped to hardware. Fundamental concepts from digital signal processing (DSP) theory, architecture, and circuit design applied to complex DSP algorithms in emerging applications for personal communications and healthcare. Letter grading. Mr. Markovic (Not offered 2016-17)

M216C. LSI in Computer System Design. (4)

(Same as Computer Science M258C.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, four hours. Requisite: course M216A. LSI/VLSI design and application in computer systems. In-depth studies of VLSI architectures and VLSI design tools. Letter grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

M217. Biomedical Imaging. (4)

(Same as Bioengineering M217.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: course 114 or 211A. Optical imaging modalities in biomedicine. Other nonoptical imaging modalities discussed briefly for comparison purposes. Letter grading. Mr. Ozcan (W)

218. Network Economics and Game Theory. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Discussion of how different cooperative and noncooperative games among agents can be constructed to model, analyze, optimize, and shape emerging interactions among users in different networks and system settings. How strategic agents can successfully compete with each other for limited and time-varying resources by optimizing their decision process and learning from their past interaction with other agents. To determine their optimal actions in these distributed, informationally decentralized environments, agents need to learn and model directly or implicitly other agents’ responses to their actions. Discussion of existing multiagent learning techniques and learning in games, including adjustment processes for learning equilibria, fictitious play, regret-learning, and more. Letter grading. Ms. van der Schaar (Not offered 2016-17)

221A. Physics of Semiconductor Devices I. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Physical principles and design considerations of junction devices. Letter grading. Mr. K.L. Wang, Mr. Woo (F)

221B. Physics of Semiconductor Devices II. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Principles and design considerations of field effect devices and charge-coupled devices. Letter grading. Mr. Woo (Sp)

221C. Microwave Semiconductor Devices. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Physical principles and design considerations of microwave solid-state devices: Schottky barrier mixer diodes, IMPATT diodes, transferred electron devices, tunnel diodes, microwave transistors. Letter grading. Mr. K.L. Wang, Mr. Woo (Not offered 2016-17)

222. Integrated Circuits Fabrication Processes. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 2. Principles of integrated circuits fabrication processes. Technological limitations of integrated circuits design. Topics include bulk crystal and epitaxial growth, thermal oxidation, diffusion, ion-implantation, chemical vapor deposition, dry etching, lithography, and metallization. Introduction of advanced process simulation tools. Letter grading. Mr. Woo (W)

223. Solid-State Electronics I. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 124, 270. Energy band theory, electronic band structure of various elementary, compound, and alloy semiconductors, defects in semiconductors. Recombination mechanisms, transport properties. Letter grading. Mr. Chui (F)

224. Solid-State Electronics II. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 223. Techniques to solve Boltzmann transport equation, various scattering mechanisms in semiconductors, high field transport properties in semiconductors, Monte Carlo method in transport. Optical properties. Letter grading. Mr. K.L. Wang (W)

225. Physics of Semiconductor Nanostructures and Devices. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 223. Theoretical methods for circulating electronics and optical properties of semiconductor structures. Quantum size effects and low-dimensional systems. Application to semiconductor nanometer scale devices, including negative resistance diodes, transistors, and detectors. Letter grading. Mr. K.L. Wang (Sp, alternate years)

229. Seminar: Advanced Topics in Solid-State Electronics. (4)

Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 223, 224. Current research areas, such as radiation effects in semiconductor devices, diffusion in semiconductors, optical and microwave semiconductor devices, nonlinear optics, and electron emission. Letter grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

229S. Advanced Electrical Engineering Seminar. (2)

Seminar, two hours; outside study, six hours. Preparation: successful completion of Ph.D. major field examination. Seminar on current research topics in solid-state and quantum electronics (Section 1) or in electronic circuit theory and applications (Section 2). Students report on tutorial topic and on research topic in their dissertation area. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

230A. Detection and Estimation in Communication. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 131A. Applications of estimation and detection concepts in communication and signal processing; random signal and noise characterizations by analysis and simulations; mean square (MS) and maximum likelihood (ML) estimations and algorithms; detection under ML, Bayes, and Neyman/Pearson (NP) criteria; signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and error probability evaluations. Introduction to Monte Carlo simulations. Letter grading. Mr. Yao (F)

230B. Digital Communication Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 132A, 230A. Principles and practical techniques for communication at physical and multiple access layers. Review of communications over Gaussian channel. Synchronization and adaptive equalization. Nonlinear impairments in radio transceivers. Wireless channel models, diversity techniques, and link budgets. Modulations for wireless channels. Multi-antenna methods. Wireless multiple access and resource allocation techniques. Scalable approaches to meeting wireless data rate demand. Letter grading. Mr. Pottie (W)

230C. Signal Processing in Communications. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 131A, 230A. Concepts and implementations of signal processing in communication and signal processing systems. Spectral analysis using Fourier transform and windowing, parametric modeling, eigen-decomposition methods, time-frequency analysis, wavelet transform, and sub-band processing. Array processing using beamforming for SNIR enhancement, smart antenna, and source separation and localization. Introduction to compressive sampling and applications. Letter grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

230D. Algorithms and Processing in Communication Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 131A, 230A. Review of computational linear algebra methods on QRD, eigen- and singular-value decompositions, and LS estimation with applications to estimation and detection in communication, radar, speech, image, and array processing systems. Systolic and parallel algorithms and VLSI architectures for high performance and high throughput real-time estimation, detection, decoding, and beamforming applications. Letter grading. Mr. Pottie (Sp)

231A. Information Theory: Channel and Source Coding. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 131A. Fundamental limits on compression and transmission of information. Topics include limits and algorithms for lossless data compression, channel capacity, rate versus distortion in lossy compression, and information theory for multiple users. Letter grading. Mr. Diggavi (F)

231B. Network Information Theory. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 231A. Point-to-point multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) wireless channels: capacity and outage; single-hop networks: multiple access, broadcast, interference, and relay channels; channels and sources with side-information; basics of multiterminal lossy data compression; basics of network information flow over general noisy networks. Letter grading. Mr. Diggavi (W)

231E. Channel Coding Theory. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 131A. Fundamentals of error control codes and decoding algorithms. Topics include block codes, convolutional codes, trellis codes, and turbo codes. Letter grading. Mr. Wesel (Sp)

232A. Stochastic Modeling with Applications to Telecommunication Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 131A. Stochastic processes as applied to study of telecommunication systems, traffic engineering, business, and management. Discrete-time and continuous-time Markov chain processes. Renewal processes, regenerative processes, Markov-renewal, semi-Markov and semiregenerative stochastic processes. Decision and reward processes. Applications to traffic and queueing analysis of basic telecommunications and computer communication networks, Internet, and management systems. Letter grading. Mr. Rubin (W)

232B. Telecommunication Switching and Queueing Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 131A. Modeling, analysis, and design of queueing systems with applications to switching systems, communications networks, wireless systems and networks, and business and management systems. Modeling, analysis, and design of Markovian and non-Markovian queueing systems. Priority service systems. Queueing networks with applications to computer communications, Internet, and management networks. Letter grading. Mr. Rubin (Not offered 2016-17)

232C. Telecommunication Architecture and Networks. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 232B. Analysis and design of integrated-service telecommunication networks and multiple-access procedures. Stochastic analysis of priority-based queueing system models. Queueing networks; network protocol architectures; error control; routing, flow, and access control. Applications to local-area, packet-radio, satellite, and computer communication networks. Letter grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

232D. Telecommunication Networks and Multiple-Access Communications. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 131A. Performance analysis and design of telecommunication networks, mobile wireless networks, and multiple-access communication systems. Network architectures, multiplexing and multiple-access, message delays, error and flow control, switching, routing, layered networking protocols, and Internet. Selected latest network systems such as cellular wireless networks, heterogeneous large/small cell networks, WiFi mesh networks, peer-to-peer mobile ad hoc wireless networks, vehicular highway networks, autonomous transportation networked systems, smart grid networks, adaptive multimedia streaming over mobile wireless networks, embedded sensor networks, satellite and long-haul networks, energy aware networking, cyber security. Letter grading. Mr. Rubin (Sp)

232E. Graphs and Network Flows. (4)

Lecture, four hours; recitation, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Solution to analysis and synthesis problems that may be formulated as flow problems in capacity constrained (or cost constrained) networks. Development of tools of network flow theory using graph theoretic methods; application to communication, transportation, and transmission problems. Letter grading. Mr. Roychowdhury (Sp)

234A. Network Coding Theory and Applications. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Algebraic approach and main theorem in network coding, combinatorial approach and alphabet size, linear programming approach and throughput benefits, network code design algorithms, secure network coding, network coding for wireless, other applications. Letter grading. Ms. Fragouli (W)

236A. Linear Programming. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: Mathematics 115A or equivalent knowledge of linear algebra. Basic graduate course in linear optimization. Geometry of linear programming. Duality. Simplex method. Interior-point methods. Decomposition and large-scale linear programming. Quadratic programming and complementary pivot theory. Engineering applications. Introduction to integer linear programming and computational complexity theory. Letter grading. Mr. Vandenberghe (F)

236B. Convex Optimization. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 236A. Introduction to convex optimization and its applications. Convex sets, functions, and basics of convex analysis. Convex optimization problems (linear and quadratic programming, second-order cone and semidefinite programming, geometric programming). Lagrange duality and optimality conditions. Applications of convex optimization. Unconstrained minimization methods. Interior-point and cutting-plane algorithms. Introduction to nonlinear programming. Letter grading. Mr. Vandenberghe (W)

236C. Optimization Methods for Large-Scale Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 236B. First-order algorithms for convex optimization: subgradient method, conjugate gradient method, proximal gradient and accelerated proximal gradient methods, block coordinate descent. Decomposition of large-scale optimization problems. Augmented Lagrangian method and alternating direction method of multipliers. Monotone operators and operator-splitting algorithms. Second-order algorithms: inexact Newton methods, interior-point algorithms for conic optimization. Letter grading. Mr. Vandenberghe (Not offered 2016-17)

M237. Dynamic Programming. (4)

(Same as Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M276.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Recommended requisite: course 232A or 236A or 236B. Introduction to mathematical analysis of sequential decision processes. Finite horizon model in both deterministic and stochastic cases. Finite-state infinite horizon model. Methods of solution. Examples from inventory theory, finance, optimal control and estimation, Markov decision processes, combinatorial optimization, communications. Letter grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

238. Multimedia Communications and Processing. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 113, 131A. Key concepts, principles, and algorithms of real-time multimedia communications and processing across heterogeneous Internet and wireless channels. Due to flexible and low-cost infrastructure, new networks and communication channels enable variety of delay-sensitive multimedia transmission applications and provide varying resources with limited support for quality of service required by delay-sensitive, bandwidth-intense, and loss-tolerant multimedia applications. New concepts, principles, theories, and practical solutions for cross-layer design that can provide optimal adaptation for time-varying channel characteristics, adaptive and delay-sensitive applications, and multiuser transmission environments. Discussion of online learning and learning how to make decisions in broad context, including Markov decision processes, optimal stopping, reinforcement learning, structural results for online learning, multiarmed bandits learning, multiagent learning. Letter grading. Ms. van der Schaar (Not offered 2016-17)

239AS. Special Topics in Signals and Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Special topics in one or more aspects of signals and systems, such as communications, control, image processing, information theory, multimedia, computer networking, optimization, speech processing, telecommunications, and VLSI signal processing. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading. Mr. Roychowdhury (F,W,Sp)

239BS. Seminar: Signals and Systems. (2 to 4)

Seminar, two to four hours; outside study, four to eight hours. Seminars and discussions on current and advanced topics in one or more aspects of signals and systems, such as communications, control, image processing, information theory, multimedia, computer networking, optimization, speech processing, telecommunications, and VLSI signal processing. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

M240A. Linear Dynamic Systems. (4)

(Same as Chemical Engineering M280A and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M270A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 141 or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 171A. State-space description of linear time-invariant (LTI) and time-varying (LTV) systems in continuous and discrete time. Linear algebra concepts such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors, singular values, Cayley/Hamilton theorem, Jordan form; solution of state equations; stability, controllability, observability, realizability, and minimality. Stabilization design via state feedback and observers; separation principle. Connections with transfer function techniques. Letter grading. Mr. Tabuada (F)

240B. Linear Optimal Control. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 141, M240A. Introduction to optimal control, with emphasis on detailed study of LQR, or linear regulators with quadratic cost criteria. Relationships to classical control system design. Letter grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

M240C. Optimal Control. (4)

(Same as Chemical Engineering M280C and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M270C.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 240B. Applications of variational methods, Pontryagin maximum principle, Hamilton/Jacobi/Bellman equation (dynamic programming) to optimal control of dynamic systems modeled by nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Letter grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

241A. Stochastic Processes. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 131B. Review of basic probability, axiomatic development, expectation, convergence of random processes: stationarity, power spectral density. Response of linear systems to random inputs. Basics of estimation. Special random processes. Letter grading. Mr. Diggavi (Not offered 2016-17)

M242A. Nonlinear Dynamic Systems. (4)

(Same as Chemical Engineering M282A and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M272A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M240A or Chemical Engineering M280A or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M270A. State-space techniques for studying solutions of time-invariant and time-varying nonlinear dynamic systems with emphasis on stability. Lyapunov theory (including converse theorems), invariance, center manifold theorem, input-to-state stability and small-gain theorem. Letter grading. Mr. Tabuada (W)

M248S. Seminar: Systems, Dynamics, and Control Topics. (2)

(Same as Chemical Engineering M297 and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M299A.) Seminar, two hours; outside study, six hours. Limited to graduate engineering students. Presentations of research topics by leading academic researchers from fields of systems, dynamics, and control. Students who work in these fields present their papers and results. S/U grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

M250B. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Fabrication. (4)

(Same as Bioengineering M250B and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M280B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course M153. Advanced discussion of micromachining processes used to construct MEMS. Coverage of many lithographic, deposition, and etching processes, as well as their combination in process integration. Materials issues such as chemical resistance, corrosion, mechanical properties, and residual/intrinsic stress. Letter grading. Mr. Candler (Sp)

M252. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Device Physics and Design. (4)

(Same as Bioengineering M252 and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M282.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Introduction to MEMS design. Design methods, design rules, sensing and actuation mechanisms, microsensors, and microactuators. Designing MEMS to be produced with both foundry and nonfoundry processes. Computer-aided design for MEMS. Design project required. Letter grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

M255. Neuroengineering. (4)

(Same as Bioengineering M260 and Neuroscience M206.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, three hours; outside study, five hours. Requisites: Mathematics 32A, Physics 1B or 6B. Introduction to principles and technologies of bioelectricity and neural signal recording, processing, and stimulation. Topics include bioelectricity, electrophysiology (action potentials, local field potentials, EEG, ECOG), intracellular and extracellular recording, microelectrode technology, neural signal processing (neural signal frequency bands, filtering, spike detection, spike sorting, stimulation artifact removal), brain-computer interfaces, deep-brain stimulation, and prosthetics. Letter grading. Mr. Markovic (Sp)

M256A-M256B-M256C. Evaluation of Research Literature in Neuroengineering. (2-2-2)

(Same as Bioengineering M261A-M261B-M261C and Neuroscience M212A-M212B-M212C.) Discussion, two hours; outside study, four hours. Critical discussion and analysis of current literature related to neuroengineering research. S/U grading. Mr. Markovic (F)

M257. Nanoscience and Technology. (4)

(Same as Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M287.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course CM250A. Introduction to fundamentals of nanoscale science and technology. Basic physical principles, quantum mechanics, chemical bonding and nanostructures, top-down and bottom-up (self-assembly) nanofabrication; nanocharacterization; nanomaterials, nanoelectronics, and nanobiodetection technology. Introduction to new knowledge and techniques in nano areas to understand scientific principles behind nanotechnology and inspire students to create new ideas in multidisciplinary nano areas. Letter grading. Mr. Chen (W)

260A. Advanced Engineering Electrodynamics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 101B, 162A. Advanced treatment of concepts in electrodynamics and their applications to modern engineering problems. Vector calculus in generalized coordinate system. Solutions of wave equation and special functions. Reflection, transmission, and polarization. Vector potential, duality, reciprocity, and equivalence theorems. Scattering from cylinder, half-plane, wedge, and sphere, including radar cross-section characterization. Green's functions in electromagnetics and dyadic calculus. Letter grading. Mr. Rahmat-Samii (F)

260B. Advanced Engineering Electrodynamics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 101B, 162A, 260A. Advanced treatment of concepts and numerical techniques in electrodynamics and their applications to modern engineering problems. Differential geometry of curves and surfaces. Geometrical optics and geometrical theory of diffraction. Physical optics techniques. Asymptotic techniques and uniform theories. Integral equations in electromagnetics. Numerical techniques based on method of moments. Letter grading. Mr. Rahmat-Samii (W)

261. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Circuits. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 163A. Rectangular and circular waveguides, microstrip, stripline, finline, and dielectric waveguide distributed circuits, with applications in microwave and millimeter wave integrated circuits. Substrate materials, surface wave phenomena. Analytical methods for discontinuity effects. Design of passive microwave and millimeter wave circuits. Letter grading. Mr. Itoh (W)

262. Antenna Theory and Design. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 162A. Antenna patterns. Sum and difference patterns. Optimum designs for rectangular and circular apertures. Arbitrary side lobe topography. Discrete arrays. Mutual coupling. Design of feeding networks. Letter grading. Mr. Rahmat-Samii (Not offered 2016-17)

263. Reflector Antennas Synthesis, Analysis, and Measurement. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 260A, 260B. Reflector pattern analysis techniques. Single and multireflector antenna configurations. Reflector synthesis techniques. Reflector feeds. Reflector tolerance studies, including systematic and random errors. Array-fed reflector antennas. Near-field measurement techniques. Compact range concepts. Microwave diagnostic techniques. Modern satellite and ground antenna applications. Letter grading. Mr. Rahmat-Samii (Not offered 2016-17)

266. Computational Methods for Electromagnetics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 162A, 163A. Computational techniques for partial differential and integral equations: finite-difference, finite-element, method of moments. Applications include transmission lines, resonators, integrated circuits, solid-state device modeling, electromagnetic scattering, and antennas. Letter grading. Mr. Itoh (Not offered 2016-17)

270. Applied Quantum Mechanics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Preparation: modern physics (or course 123A), linear algebra, and ordinary differential equations courses. Principles of quantum mechanics for applications in lasers, solid-state physics, and nonlinear optics. Topics include eigenfunction expansions, observables, Schrödinger equation, uncertainty principle, central force problems, Hilbert spaces, WKB approximation, matrix mechanics, density matrix formalism, and radiation theory. Letter grading. Mr. Stafsudd (F)

271. Classical Laser Theory. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 170A. Microscopic and macroscopic laser phenomena and propagation of optical pulses using classical formalism. Letter grading. Mr. Joshi (W)

272. Dynamics of Lasers. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 271. Ultrashort laser pulse characteristics, generation, and measurement. Gain switching, Q switching, cavity dumping, active and passive mode locking. Pulse compression and soliton pulse formation. Nonlinear pulse generation: soliton laser, additive-pulse mode locking, and parametric oscillators. Pulse measurement techniques. Letter grading. Mr. Joshi (Sp)

273. Nonlinear Photonics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 170A. Recommended: course 271. Nonlinear optical susceptibilities. Coupled-wave and coupled-mode theories. Crystal optics, electro-optics, and magneto-optics. Nonlinear optical interactions, sum- and difference-frequency generation, harmonic and parametric generation, stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering, field-induced index changes and self-phase modulation. Nonlinear photonic devices. Nonlinear guided-wave photonics and devices. Letter grading. Mr. Liu (W)

274. Fiber Optic System Design. (4)

Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisites: courses 173D and/or 174. Top-down introduction to physical layer design in fiber optic communication systems, including Telecom, Datacom, and CATV. Fundamentals of digital and analog optical communication systems, fiber transmission characteristics, and optical modulation techniques, including direct and external modulation and computer-aided design. Architectural-level design of fiber optic transceiver circuits, including preamplifier, quantizer, clock and data recovery, laser driver, and predistortion circuits. Letter grading. Mr. Jalali (W)

279AS. Special Topics in Physical and Wave Electronics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Special topics in one or more aspects of physical and wave electronics, such as electromagnetics, microwave and millimeter wave circuits, photonics and optoelectronics, plasma electronics, microelectromechanical systems, solid state, and nanotechnology. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading. Mr. Williams (W,Sp)

279BS. Seminar: Physical and Wave Electronics. (2 to 4)

Seminar, two to four hours; outside study, four to eight hours. Seminars and discussions on current and advanced topics in one or more aspects of physical and wave electronics, such as electromagnetics, microwave and millimeter wave circuits, photonics and optoelectronics, plasma electronics, microelectromechanical systems, solid state, and nanotechnology. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

279CS. Clean Green IGERT Brown-Bag Seminar. (1)

Seminar, one hour. Required of students in Clean Energy for Green Industry (IGERT) Research. Literature seminar presented by graduate students and experts from around country who conduct research in energy harvest, storage, and conservation. S/U grading. Mr. Williams (Not offered 2016-17)

CM282. Science, Technology, and Public Policy. (4)

(Same as Public Policy CM282.) Lecture, three hours. Recent and continuing advances in science and technology are raising profoundly important public policy issues. Consideration of selection of critical policy issues, each of which has substantial ethical, social, economic, political, scientific, and technological aspects. Concurrently scheduled with course CM182. Letter grading. Mr. Villasenor (W)

285A. Plasma Waves and Instabilities. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 101A, and M185 or Physics M122. Wave phenomena in plasmas described by macroscopic fluid equations. Microwave propagation, plasma oscillations, ion acoustic waves, cyclotron waves, hydromagnetic waves, drift waves. Rayleigh/Taylor, Kelvin/Helmholtz, universal, and streaming instabilities. Application to experiments in fully and partially ionized gases. Letter grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

285B. Advanced Plasma Waves and Instabilities. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses M185, and 285A or Physics 222A. Interaction of intense electromagnetic waves with plasmas: waves in inhomogeneous and bounded plasmas, nonlinear wave coupling and damping, parametric instabilities, anomalous resistivity, shock waves, echoes, laser heating. Emphasis on experimental considerations and techniques. Letter grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

M287. Fusion Plasma Physics and Analysis. (4)

(Same as Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M237B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Fundamentals of plasmas at thermonuclear burning conditions. Fokker/Planck equation and applications to heating by neutral beams, RF, and fusion reaction products. Bremsstrahlung, synchrotron, and atomic radiation processes. Plasma surface interactions. Fluid description of burning plasma. Dynamics, stability, and control. Applications in tokamaks, tandem mirrors, and alternate concepts. Letter grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

293. Intellectual Property for Technology Entrepreneurs and Managers. (2)

Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Introduction to intellectual property (IP) in context of technology products and markets. Topics include best practices to put in place before product development starts, how to develop high-value patent portfolios, patent licensing, offensive and defensive IP litigation considerations, trade secrets, opportunities and pitfalls of open source software, trademarks, managing copyright in increasingly complex content ecosystems, and adopting IP strategies to globalized marketplaces. Includes case studies inspired by complex IP questions facing technology companies today. S/U or letter grading. Mr. Villasenor (Sp)

295. Academic Technical Writing for Electrical Engineers. (3)

Seminar, three hours. Designed for electrical engineering Ph.D. students who have completed preliminary examinations. Students read models of good writing and learn to make rhetorical observations and writing decisions, improve their academic and technical writing skills by writing and revising conference and journal papers, and practice writing for and speaking to various audiences, including potential students, engineers outside their specific fields, and nonengineers (colleagues outside field, policymakers, etc.). Students write in variety of genres, all related to their professional development as electrical engineers. Emphasis on writing as vital way to communicate precise technical and professional information in distinct contexts, directly resulting in specific outcomes. S/U grading. (F,W,Sp)

296. Seminar: Research Topics in Electrical Engineering. (2)

Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in electrical engineering. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

297. Seminar Series: Electrical Engineering. (1)

Seminar, 90 minutes; outside study, 90 minutes. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Weekly seminars and discussion by invited speakers on research topics of heightened interest. S/U grading. (F,W,Sp)

298. Seminar: Engineering. (2 to 4)

Seminar, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Seminars may be organized in advanced technical fields. If appropriate, field trips may be arranged. May be repeated with topic change. S/U or letter grading. (Not offered 2016-17)

299. M.S. Project Seminar. (4)

Seminar, to be arranged. Required of all M.S. students not in thesis option. Supervised research in small groups or individually under guidance of faculty mentor. Regular meetings, culminating report, and presentation required. Individual contract required; enrollment petitions available in Office of Graduate Student Affairs. S/U grading. Mr. Chui (F,W,Sp)

375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum. (1 to 4)

Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading. (F,W,Sp)

495. Teaching Assistant Training Seminar. (1)

Seminar, one hour; outside study, two hours. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Required of all departmental teaching assistants (TAs). May be taken concurrently while holding TA appointment. Seminar on departmental TA expectations, responsibilities, basic assignments, ethics, ABET reporting, online resources, and electrical engineering web. S/U grading. Ms. Alwan (F)

596. Directed Individual or Tutorial Studies. (2 to 8)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Petition forms to request enrollment may be obtained from assistant dean, Graduate Studies. Supervised investigation of advanced technical problems. S/U grading.

597A. Preparation for M.S. Comprehensive Examination. (2 to 12)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Reading and preparation for M.S. comprehensive examination. S/U grading.

597B. Preparation for Ph.D. Preliminary Examinations. (2 to 16)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. S/U grading.

597C. Preparation for Ph.D. Oral Qualifying Examination. (2 to 16)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Preparation for oral qualifying examination, including preliminary research on dissertation. S/U grading.

598. Research for and Preparation of M.S. Thesis. (2 to 12)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Supervised independent research for M.S. candidates, including thesis prospectus. S/U grading.

599. Research for and Preparation of Ph.D. Dissertation. (2 to 16)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Usually taken after students have been advanced to candidacy. S/U grading.


1.Also Professor Emeritus of Physics

2.Also Professor Emeritus of Anesthesiology