Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

UCLA
48-121 Engineering IV
Box 951597
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597

 

(310) 825-7793
fax: (310) 206-4830
http://www.mae.ucla.edu

Adrienne Lavine, Ph.D., Chair
Xiaolin Zhong, Ph.D., Vice Chair
Robert T. M'Closkey, Ph.D., Vice Chair

Professors

Mohamed A. Abdou, Ph.D.

Oddvar O. Bendiksen, Ph.D.

Gregory P. Carman, Ph.D.

Albert Carnesale, Ph.D.

Ivan Catton, Ph.D.

Yong Chen, Ph.D.

Vijay K. Dhir, Ph.D., Dean

Rajit Gadh, Ph.D.

Nasr M. Ghoniem, Ph.D.

James S. Gibson, Ph.D.

Vijay Gupta, Ph.D.

H. Thomas Hahn, Ph.D. (Raytheon Company Professor of Manufacturing Engineering)

Chih-Ming Ho, Ph.D. (Ben Rich Lockheed Martin Professor of Aeronautics)

Ann R. Karagozian, Ph.D.

Chang-Jin (C-J) Kim, Ph.D.

J. John Kim, Ph.D. (Rockwell International Professor of Engineering)

Adrienne Lavine, Ph.D.

Kuo-Nan Liou, Ph.D.

Ajit K. Mal, Ph.D.

Robert T. M'Closkey, Ph.D.

Anthony F. Mills, Ph.D.

Jeff S. Shamma, Ph.D.

Owen I. Smith, Ph.D.

Jason Speyer, Ph.D.

Tsu-Chin Tsao, Ph.D.

Daniel C.H. Yang, Ph.D.

Xiaolin Zhong, Ph.D.

Professors Emeriti

Andrew F. Charwat, Ph.D.

Peretz P. Friedmann, Sc.D.

Walter C. Hurty, M.S.

Robert E. Kelly, Sc.D.

Cornelius T. Leondes, Ph.D.

Michel A. Melkanoff, Ph.D.

D. Lewis Mingori, Ph.D.

Peter A. Monkewitz, Ph.D.

Philip F. O'Brien, M.S.

David Okrent, Ph.D.

Russell R. O'Neill, Ph.D., Dean Emeritus

Lucien A. Schmit, Jr., M.S.

Chauncey Starr, Ph.D., Dean Emeritus

Richard Stern, Ph.D.

Russell A. Westmann, Ph.D.

Assistant Professors

Pei-Yu Chiou, Ph.D.

Jeff D. Eldredge, Ph.D.

Emilio Frazzoli, Ph.D.

Yongho Sungtaek Ju, Ph.D.

H. Pirouz Kavehpour, Ph.D.

William S. Klug, Ph.D.

Laurent Pilon, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer

Alexander Samson, Ph.D., Emeritus

Lecturers

Ravnesh Amar, Ph.D.

C.H. Chang, M.S., Emeritus

Amiya K. Chatterjee, Ph.D.

Wilbur J. Marner, Ph.D.

Rudolf X. Meyer, Dr.Engr., Emeritus

Adjunct Professors

Leslie M. Lackman, Ph.D.

Joseph Miller, Ph.D.

Neil B. Morley, Ph.D.

Raymond Viskanta, Ph.D.

Xiang Zhang, Ph.D.

Scope and Objectives

The Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department encompasses professional disciplines that are often divided into separate departments at other engineering schools. Curricula in aerospace engineering and mechanical engineering are offered on both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Because of the scope of the department, faculty research and teaching cover a wide range of technical disciplines. Research in thermal engineering emphasizes basic heat and mass transfer processes as well as thermal hydraulics. Topics in the area of design, dynamics, and control include robotics, mechanism design, control and guidance of aircraft and spacecraft, aeromechanics, and dynamics and control of large space structures. Studies in structural mechanics range from fracture mechanics and wave propagation, structural dynamics and aeroelasticity of helicopters and jet engine blades, computational transonic aeroelasticity to structural optimization and synthesis, and mechanics of composite structures. In the area of fluid mechanics and acoustics, investigations are under way on combustion, flow instabilities, turbulence and thermal convection, aeroacoustics, and unsteady aerodynamics of turbomachines, helicopter rotors, and fixed-wing aircraft. Other areas of research include applied plasma physics, surface modification by plasma, fusion reactor design, experimental tokamak confinement physics; light water reactor safety; reliability and risk assessment methodology; and nuclear materials. The department also has research activity in computer-aided design and manufacturing.

At the undergraduate level, the department offers accredited programs leading to B.S. degrees in Aerospace Engineering and in Mechanical Engineering. The former includes opportunity to emphasize propulsion, aerodynamics, design, dynamics
and control, or structures and space technology, while the latter includes opportunity to emphasize design and manufacturing, dynamics and control, or fluids and thermal engineering.

At the graduate level, the department offers programs leading to M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering and in Aerospace Engineering. An M.S. in Manufacturing Engineering is also offered.

Department Mission

The mission of the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department is to educate the nation's future leaders in the science and art of mechanical and aerospace engineering. Further, the department seeks to expand the frontiers of engineering science and to encourage technological innovation while fostering academic excellence and scholarly learning in a collegial environment.

Undergraduate Program Objectives

In consultation with its constituents, the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department has set its educational objectives as follows: (1) to teach students how to apply their rigorous undergraduate education to creatively solve technical problems facing society and (2) to prepare them for successful and productive careers or graduate studies in mechanical or aerospace or other engineering fields and/or further studies in other fields such as medicine, business, and law.

Aerospace Engineering B.S.

The ABET-accredited aerospace engineering program is concerned with the design and construction of various types of fixed-wing and rotary-wing (helicopters) aircraft used for air transportation and national defense. It is also concerned with the design and construction of spacecraft, the exploration and utilization of space, and related technological fields.

Aerospace engineering is characterized by a very high level of technology. The aerospace engineer is likely to operate at the forefront of scientific discoveries, often stimulating these discoveries and providing the inspiration for the creation of new scientific concepts. Meeting these demands requires the imaginative use of many disciplines, including fluid mechanics and aerodynamics, structural mechanics, materials and aeroelasticity, dynamics, control and guidance, propulsion, and energy conversion.

Preparation for the Major

Required: Chemistry and Biochemistry 20A, 20B, 20L; Computer Science 31; Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B, 33A, 33B; Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL.

The Major

Required: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 101, 102, 103, 105A, 107, 107L, 150A, 150B, 150P, 154A, 154B, 154S, 155 or 161A or 169A, 157A, 157S, 166A, 171A, 182A; two departmental breadth courses (Electrical Engineering 100 and Materials Science and Engineering 104 -- if these courses are taken as part of the breadth requirement, an extra elective from within the department may be substituted here); three breadth courses (12 units) selected from an approved list available in the Office of Academic and Student Affairs; and two major field elective courses (8 units) from Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 105D, 131A, 131AL, 132A, 133A, 133AL, 150C, 150R, 153A, 155, 161A, 161B, 161C, 161D, 162A, 162C, 163A, 166C, 168, 169A, 171B, 183.

For information on University and general education requirements, see Requirements for B.S. Degrees on page 21 or http://www.registrar.ucla.edu/ge/GE-ENGRNew
06-07.pdf.

Mechanical Engineering B.S.

The ABET-accredited mechanical engineering program is designed to provide basic knowledge in thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, solid mechanics, mechanical design, dynamics, control, mechanical systems, manufacturing, and materials. The program includes fundamental subjects important to all mechanical engineers.

Preparation for the Major

Required: Chemistry and Biochemistry 20A, 20B, 20L; Computer Science 31; Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B, 33A, 33B; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 94; Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL.

The Major

Required: Electrical Engineering 110L, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 101, 102, 103, 105A, 105D, 107, 107L, 131A or 133A, 156A, 157, 162A, 162B, 162M, 171A, 182A, 183; two departmental breadth courses (Electrical Engineering 100 and Materials Science and Engineering 104 -- if these courses are taken as part of the breadth requirement, an extra elective from within the department may be substituted here); three breadth courses (12 units) selected from an approved list available in the Office of Academic and Student Affairs; and two major field elective courses (8 units) from Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 131AL, 132A, 133AL, 134, CM140, 150A, 150B, 150C, 150P, 150R, 153A, 155, 157A, 161A, 161B, 162C, 163A, 166C, 168, 171B, 172, 174, CM180, CM180L, 181A, 182B, 182C, 184, 185.

For information on University and general education requirements, see Requirements for B.S. Degrees on page 21 or http://www.registrar.ucla.edu/ge/GE-ENGRNew06-07.pdf.

Graduate Study

For information on graduate admission, see Graduate Programs, page 24.

The following introductory information is based on the 2006-07 edition of Program Requirements for UCLA Graduate Degrees. Complete annual editions of Program Requirements are available from the "Publications" link at http://www.gdnet.ucla.edu. Students are subject to the degree requirements as published in Program Requirements for the year in which they matriculate.

The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering offers the Master of Science (M.S.) degree in Manufacturing Engineering, Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in Aerospace Engineering, and Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in Mechanical Engineering.

Aerospace Engineering M.S. and Mechanical Engineering M.S.

Course Requirements

Students may select either the thesis plan or comprehensive examination plan. At least nine courses are required, of which at least five must be graduate courses. In the thesis plan, seven of the nine must be formal courses, including at least four from the 200 series. The remaining two may be 598 courses involving work on the thesis. In the comprehensive examination plan, no units of 500-series courses may be applied toward the minimum course requirement. The courses should be selected so that the breadth requirements and the requirements at the graduate level are met. The breadth requirements are only applicable to students who do not have a B.S. degree from an ABET-accredited aerospace or mechanical engineering program.

Undergraduate Courses. No lower division courses may be applied toward graduate degrees. In addition, the following upper division courses are not applicable toward graduate degrees: Chemical Engineering 102A, 199; Civil and Environmental Engineering 106A, 199; Computer Science M152A, M152B, M171L, 199; Electrical Engineering 100, 101, 102, 103, 110L, M116D, M116L, M171L, 199; Materials Science and Engineering 110, 120, 130, 131, 131L, 132, 140, 141L, 150, 160, 161L, 199; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 101, 102, 103, 105A, 105D, 199.

Aerospace Engineering

Breadth Requirements. Students are required to take at least three courses from the following four categories: (1) Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 154A or 154B or 154S, (2) 150B or 150P, (3) 155 or 166A or 169A, (4) 161A or 171A.

Graduate-Level Requirement. Students are required to take at least one course from the following: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 250C, 250D, 250F, 253B, 254A, 255B, 256F, 263B, 269D, or 271B. The remaining courses can be taken to gain depth in one or more of the several specialty areas covering the existing major fields in the department.

Mechanical Engineering

Breadth Requirements. Students are required to take at least three courses from the following five categories: (1) Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 162A or 169A or 171A, (2) 150A or 150B, (3) 131A or 133A, (4) 156A, (5) 162B or 183.

Graduate-Level Requirement. Students are required to take at least one course from the following: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 231A, 231B, 231C, 250A, 255A, M256A, M256B, M269A, or 271A. The remaining courses can be taken to gain depth in one or more of the several specialty areas covering the existing major fields in the department.

Comprehensive Examination Plan

The comprehensive examination is required in either written or oral form. A committee of at least three faculty members, with at least two members from within the department, and chaired by the academic adviser, is established to administer the examination. Students may, in consultation with their adviser and the M.S. committee, select one of the following options for the comprehensive examination: (1) take and pass the first part of the Ph.D. written qualifying examination (formerly referred to as the preliminary examination) as the comprehensive examination or (2) conduct a research or design project and submit a final report to the M.S. committee.

Thesis Plan

The thesis must describe some original piece of research that has been done under the supervision of the thesis committee. Students should normally start to plan the thesis at least one year before the award of the M.S. degree is expected. There is no examination under the thesis plan.

Manufacturing Engineering M.S.

Areas of Study

Consult the department.

Course Requirements

Students may select either the thesis plan or comprehensive examination plan. At least nine courses are required, of which at least five must be graduate courses. In the thesis plan, seven of the nine must be formal courses, including at least four from the 200 series. The remaining two may be 598 courses involving work on the thesis. In the comprehensive examination plan, no units of 500-series courses may be applied toward the minimum course requirement. Choices may be made from the following major areas:

Undergraduate Courses. No lower division courses may be applied toward graduate degrees. In addition, the following upper division courses are not applicable toward graduate degrees: Chemical Engineering 102A, 199; Civil and Environmental Engineering 106A, 199; Computer Science M152A, M152B, M171L, 199; Electrical Engineering 100, 101, 102, 103, 110L, M116D, M116L, M171L, 199; Materials Science and Engineering 110, 120, 130, 131, 131L, 132, 140, 141L, 150, 160, 161L, 199; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 101, 102, 103, 105A, 105D, 199.

Upper Division Courses. Students are required to take at least three courses from the following: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 163A, 168, 174, 183, 184, 185.

Graduate Courses. Students are required to take at least three courses from the following: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 263A, 263C, 263D, CM280A, 293, 294, 295A, 295B, 296A, 296B, 297.

Additional Courses. The remaining courses may be taken from other major fields of study in the department or from the following: Architecture and Urban Design M226B, M227B, 227D; Computer Science 241A, 241B; Management 240A, 240D, 241A, 241B, 242A, 242B, 243B, 243C; Mathematics 120A, 120B.

Comprehensive Examination Plan

The comprehensive examination is required in either written or oral form. A committee of at least three faculty members, with at least two members from within the department, and chaired by the academic adviser, is established to administer the examination. Students may, in consultation with their adviser and the M.S. committee, select one of the following options for the comprehensive examination: (1) take and pass the first part of the Ph.D. written qualifying examination (formerly referred to as the preliminary examination) as the comprehensive examination or (2) conduct a research or design project and submit a final report to the M.S. committee.

Thesis Plan

The thesis must describe some original piece of research that has been done under the supervision of the thesis committee. Students would normally start to plan the thesis at least one year before the award of the M.S. degree is expected. There is no examination under the thesis plan.

Aerospace Engineering Ph.D. and Mechanical Engineering Ph.D.

Major Fields or Subdisciplines

Dynamics; fluid mechanics; heat and mass transfer; manufacturing and design (mechanical engineering only); nanoelectromechanical/microelectromechanical systems (NEMS/MEMS); structural and solid mechanics; systems and control.

Ph.D. students may propose ad hoc major fields, which must differ substantially from established major fields and satisfy one of the following two conditions: (1) the field is interdisciplinary in nature and (2) the field represents an important research area for which there is no established major field in the department (condition 2 most often applies to recently evolving research areas or to areas for which there are too few faculty to maintain an established major field).

Students in an ad hoc major field must be sponsored by at least three faculty members, at least two of whom must be from the department.

Course Requirements

The basic program of study for the Ph.D. degree is built around major and minor fields. The established major fields are listed above, and a detailed syllabus describing each Ph.D. major field can be obtained from the Student Affairs Office.

The program of study for the Ph.D. requires students to perform original research leading to a doctoral dissertation and to master a body of knowledge that encompasses material from their major field and breadth material from outside the major field. The body of knowledge should include (1) six major field courses, at least four of which must be graduate courses, (2) one minor field, (3) any three additional courses, at least two of which must be graduate courses, that enhance the study of the major or minor field.

The major field syllabus advises students as to which courses contain the required knowledge, and students usually prepare for the written qualifying examination (formerly referred to as the preliminary examination) by taking these courses. However, students can acquire such knowledge by taking similar courses at other universities or even by self-study.

The minor field embraces a body of knowledge equivalent to three courses, at least two of which must be graduate courses. Minor fields are often subsets of major fields, and minor field requirements are then described in the syllabus of the appropriate major field. Established minor fields with no corresponding major field can also be used, such as applied mathematics and applied plasma physics and fusion engineering. Also, an ad hoc field can be used in exceptional circumstances, such as when certain knowledge is desirable for a program of study that is not available in established minor fields.

Grades of B- or better, with a grade-point average of at least 3.33 in all courses included in the minor field, and the three additional courses mentioned above are required. If students fail to satisfy the minor field requirements through coursework, a minor field examination may be taken (once only).

Written and Oral Qualifying Examinations

After mastering the body of knowledge defined in the major field, students take a written qualifying (preliminary) examination covering this knowledge. Students must have been formally admitted to the Ph.D. program or admitted subject to completion of the M.S. degree by the end of the quarter following the quarter in which the examination is given. The examination must be taken within the first two calendar years from the time of admission to the Ph.D. program. Students must be registered during the quarter in which the examination is given and be in good academic standing (minimum GPA of 3.25). The student's major field proposal must be completed prior to taking the examination. Students may not take an examination more than twice. Students in an ad hoc major field must pass a written qualifying examination that is approximately equivalent in scope, length, and level to the written qualifying examination for an established major field.

After passing the written qualifying examination, students take the University Oral Qualifying Examination within four calendar years from the time of admission to the Ph.D. program. The nature and content of the examination are at the discretion of the doctoral committee but include a review of the dissertation prospectus and may include a broad inquiry into the student's preparation for research.

Note: Doctoral Committees. A doctoral committee consists of a minimum of four members. Three members, including the chair, are "inside" members and must hold appointments at UCLA in the student's major department in HSSEAS. The "outside" member must be a UCLA faculty member outside the student's major department.

Fields of Study

Dynamics

Features of the dynamics field include dynamics and control of physical systems, including spacecraft, aircraft, helicopters, industrial manipulators; analytical studies of control of large space structures; aeromechanical stability of helicopters; active control of helicopter vibrations; experimental studies of electromechanical systems; and robotics.

Fluid Mechanics

The fluid mechanics field includes theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies related to topics in fluid mechanics such as fluid instabilities, flow transition, numerical simulation of turbulence, flow control, computational aerodynamics, hypersonic flow, aerodynamic noise production, high-speed combustion, acoustically driven combusting flows, laser diagnostics, microgravity studies of interfacial phenomena and combustion, thermocapillary convection, and microscale/nanoscale fluid mechanics and combustion.

Heat and Mass Transfer

The heat and mass transfer field includes studies of convection, radiation, conduction, evaporation, condensation, boiling, two-phase flow, instability and turbulent flow, microscale and nanoscale heat transfer and direct energy conversion, and reactive flows in porous media.

Manufacturing and Design

The manufacturing and design field is developed around an integrated approach to manufacturing and mechanical product design. It includes research on material behavior (physical and mechanical) in manufacturing processes and in design; design of mechanical systems (e.g., power, microelectromechanical systems, and transportation); design methodology; automation, robotics, and unmanned machinery; manufacturing and mechanical systems (reliability, safety, and optimization); CAD/CAM theory and applications; computational geometry and geometrical modeling.

Nanoelectromechanical/Microelectromechanical Systems

The nanoelectromechanical/microelectromechanical systems (NEMS/MEMS) field focuses on science and engineering issues ranging in size from nanometers to millimeters and includes both experimental and theoretical studies covering fundamentals to applications. The study topics include microscience, top-down and bottom-up nano/micro fabrication technologies, molecular fluidic phenomena, nanoscale/microscale material processing, biomolecular signatures, heat transfer at the nanoscale, and system integration. The program is highly interdisciplinary in nature.

Structural and Solid Mechanics

The solid mechanics field features theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies, including fracture mechanics and damage tolerance, micromechanics with emphasis on technical applications, wave propagation and nondestructive evaluation, mechanics of composite materials, mechanics of thin films and interfaces, and investigation into coupled electro-magneto-thermomechanical material systems. The structural mechanics field includes structural dynamics with applications to aircraft and spacecraft, fixed-wing and rotary-wing aeroelasticity, fluid structure interaction, computational transonic aeroelasticity, structural optimization, finite element methods and related computational techniques, mechanics of composite structures, and analysis of adaptive structures.

Systems and Control

The systems and control field deals with modeling, analysis, and control of dynamical systems. Applied mathematics is used to develop methods for stability analysis, design of optimal and robust control systems, filtering, and system identification. Courses and research programs include theoretical analysis of the performance of systems and algorithms; computational methods for simulation, optimization, control, filtering, and identification; and experimental studies involving system identification and hardware implementation of real-time control and filtering. The field covers a broad spectrum of applications areas, primarily emphasizing problems in mechanical and aerospace engineering.

Ad Hoc Major Fields

The ad hoc major fields program has sufficient flexibility that students can form academic major fields in their area of interest if the proposals are supported by several faculty members. Previous fields of study included acoustics, system risk and reliability, and engineering thermodynamics. Nuclear science and engineering, a former active major field, is available on an ad hoc basis only.

Facilities

The Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department has a number of experimental facilities at which both fundamental and applied research is being conducted. More information is at http://www.mae.ucla.edu.

Active Materials Laboratory

The Active Materials Laboratory contains equipment to evaluate the coupled response of materials such as piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, shape memory alloys, and fiber optic sensors. The laboratory has manufacturing facilities to fabricate magnetostrictive composites and thin film shape memory alloys. Testing active material systems is performed on one of four servo-hydraulic load frames. All of the load frames are equipped with thermal chambers, solenoids, and electrical power supplies.

Autonomous Vehicle Systems Instrumentation Laboratory

The Autonomous Vehicle Systems Instrumentation Laboratory (AVSIL) is a testbed at UCLA for design, building, evaluation, and testing of hardware instrumentation and coordination algorithms for multiple vehicle autonomous systems. The AVSIL contains a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulator designed and built at UCLA that allows for real-time, systems-level tests of two formation control computer systems in a laboratory environment, using the Interstate Electronics Corporation GPS Satellite Constellation Simulator. The UCLA flight control software can be modified to accommodate satellite-system experiments using real-time software, GPS receivers, and inter-vehicle modem communication.

Combustion Research Laboratory

The Combustion Research Laboratory includes a resonant dump combustor for the study of hazardous waste incineration, mixing and combustion tunnels for study of emissions reduction in fuel injection systems, and several flat flame burners and flow reactors. There are also extensive optical diagnostic capabilities. For flight testing, facilities at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center are used.

Computational Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

The Computational Fluid Dynamics Laboratory has several medium-size Beowolf linux clusters for numerical simulation of transitional, turbulent, and high speed compressible flows, with and without reaction, as well as the sound that they produce. The laboratory has access to supercomputers (large clusters of parallel processors on various platforms) at NSF PACI Centers and DoD High-Performance Computing Centers.

Fluid Mechanics Research Laboratory

The Fluid Mechanics Research Laboratory includes a full line of water tunnels equipped with various advanced transducers (MEMS-based sensors and actuators, particle image anemometer, laser Doppler anemometer, hot-wire anemometers) and data acquisition systems.

Fusion Technology Center

The Fusion Technology Center includes a number of state-of-the-art experimental facilities for conducting research in fusion engineering. The center includes experimental facilities for (1) liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic fluid flow, (2) thick and thin liquid metal systems exposed to intense particle and heat flux loads, and (3) metallic and ceramic material thermomechanics.

Heat Transfer Laboratories

The Heat Transfer Laboratories are used for experimental research on heat transfer and thermal hydraulics. The laboratories are equipped with several flow loops, high-current power supplies, high-frequency induction power supplies, holography and hot-wire anemometry setups, and state-of-the-art data acquisition systems.

Materials Degradation Characterization Laboratory

The Materials Degradation Characterization Laboratory is used for the characterization of the degradation of high-strength metallic alloys and advanced composites due to corrosion and fatigue, determination of adverse effects of materials degradation on the strength of structural components, and for research on fracture mechanics and ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation.

Micro-Manufacturing Laboratory

The Micro-Manufacturing Laboratory is equipped with a fume hood, a clean air bench, an optical table, a DI water generator, dicing saw, plating setup with Dynatronix power supply, Wentworth probe stations, various microscopes such as Endo View and Hirox 3-D High-Scope System, full video imaging capability such as a Sony Digital Camera system, as well as L-Edit mask layout software. It is used for MEMS research and complements the HSSEAS Nanoelectronics Research Facility, the 8,500-square-foot class 100/1000 clean room where most micromachining steps are carried out.

Microsciences Laboratory

The Microsciences Laboratory is equipped with advanced sensors and imaging processors for exploring fundamental physical mechanisms in MEMS-based sciences.

Multifunctional Composites Laboratory

The Multifunctional Composites Laboratory provides equipment necessary to develop multifunctional nanocomposites and explore their applications by integrating technologies involving composites, nanomaterials, information, functional materials, biomimetics, and concurrent engineering. Some of the equipment in the laboratory includes an autoclave, a filament winder, a resin transfer molding machine, a waterjet cutting machine, a stereo lithography machine, a laminated object manufacturing machine, a coordinate measuring machine, a field emission scanning electron microscope, a scanning probe microscope, an FTIR, a rheometer, a thermal analysis system, an RCL analyzer, a microdielectric analyzer, an X-ray radiography machine, and a variety of mechanical testing machines.

Nanoscale Heat Transfer and Thermoelectrics Laboratory

The Nanoscale Heat Transfer and Thermoelectrics Laboratory (Nano-HTTL) is equipped with a scanning probe microscope (atomic force, scanning tunneling, scanning thermal, and scanning laser), infrared microscope with 4m resolution, gas and solid-state lasers (argon, T-Sapphire, and semiconductor lasers) and optical systems, vacuum systems for low- to high-temperature property measurement (4 K-800 K), a probe station, various thin-film thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurement systems, analytical equipment, various computers for data acquisition, and an HP workstation for computational work.

Plasma and Beam Assisted Manufacturing Laboratory

The Plasma and Beam Assisted Manufacturing Laboratory is an experimental facility for the purpose of processing and manufacturing advanced materials by high-energy means (plasma and beam sources). It is equipped with plasma diagnostics, two vortex gas tunnel plasma guns, powder feeder and exhaust systems, vacuum and cooling equipment, high-power D.C. supplies (400kw), vacuum chambers, and large electromagnets. Current research is focused on ceramic coatings and nano-phase clusters for applications in thermal insulation, wear resistance, and high-temperature oxidation resistance.

Subsonic Wind Tunnel

The 3 x 3-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel is used for research on unsteady aerodynamics on oscillating airfoils and instruction.

Thin Films, Interfaces, Composites, Characterization Laboratory

The Thin Films, Interfaces, Composites, Characterization Laboratory consists of a Nd:YAG laser of 1 Joule capacity with three ns pulse widths, a state-of-the-art optical interferometer including an ultra high-speed digitizer, sputter deposition chamber, 56 Kip-capacity servohydraulic biaxial test frame, walk-in freezer, polishing and imaging equipment for microstructural characterization for measurement and control study of thin film interface strength, NDE using laser ultrasound, de-icing of structural surfaces, and characterization of composites under multiaxial stress state.

Faculty Areas of Thesis Guidance

Professors

Mohamed A. Abdou, Ph.D. (Wisconsin, 1973)

Fusion, nuclear, and mechanical engineering design, testing, and system analysis, thermomechanics; thermal hydraulics; neutronics, plasma-material interactions; blankets and high heat flux components; experiments, modeling and analysis

Oddvar O. Bendiksen, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1980)

Classical and computational aeroelasticity, structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics

Gregory P. Carman, Ph.D. (Virginia Tech, 1991)

Electromagnetoelasticity models, fatigue characterization of piezoelectric ceramics, magnetostrictive composites, characterizing shape memory alloys, fiber-optic sensors, design of damage detection systems, micromechanical analysis of composite materials, experimentally evaluating damage in composites

Albert Carnesale, Ph.D. (North Carolina State, 1966)

Issues associated with nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, energy policy, American foreign policy

Ivan Catton, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1966)

Heat transfer and fluid mechanics, transport phenomena in porous media, nucleonics heat transfer and thermal hydraulics, natural and forced convection, thermal/hydrodynamic stability, turbulence

Yong Chen, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1996)

Nanoscale science and engineering, micro- and nano-fabrication, self-assembly phenomena, micro- and nano-scale electronic, mechanical, optical, biological, and sensing devices, circuits and systems

Vijay K. Dhir, Ph.D. (Kentucky, 1972)

Two-phase heat transfer, boiling and condensation, thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactors, microgravity heat transfer, soil remediation, high-power density electronic cooling

Rajit Gadh, Ph.D. (Carnegie Mellon, 1991)

Mobile Internet, web-based product design, wireless and collaborative engineering, CAD/visualization

Nasr M. Ghoniem, Ph.D. (Wisconsin, 1977)

Mechanical behavior of high-temperature materials, radiation interaction with material (e.g., laser, ions, plasma, electrons, and neutrons), material processing by plasma and beam sources, physics and mechanics of material defects, fusion energy

James S. Gibson, Ph.D. (U. Texas, Austin, 1975)

Control and identification of dynamical systems; optimal and adaptive control of distributed systems, including flexible structures and fluid flows; adaptive filtering, identification, and noise cancellation

Vijay Gupta, Ph.D. (MIT, 1989)

Experimental mechanics, fracture of engineering solids, mechanics of thin film and interfaces, failure mechanisms and characterization of composite materials, ice mechanics

H. Thomas Hahn, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State, 1971)

Nanocomposites, multifunctional composites, nanomechanics, rapid prototyping, information systems

Chih-Ming Ho, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins, 1974)

Molecular fluidic phenomena, nanoelectro-mechanical/microelectromechanical systems, direct handling of macromolecules, bionano technologies, DNA-based micro sensors

Ann R. Karagozian, Ph.D. (Cal Tech, 1982)

Fluid mechanics of combustion systems with emphasis on acoustically controlled reacting flows detonation phenomena, high-speed combustion systems, and microgravity combustion

Chang-Jin (C-J) Kim, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1991)

Microelectromechanical systems, micromachining technologies, microstructures, sensors and actuators, microdevices and systems, micromanufacturing, microscale mechanics

J. John Kim, Ph.D. (Stanford, 1978)

Turbulence, numerical simulation of turbulent and transitional flows, application of control theories to flow control

Adrienne Lavine, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1984)

Heat transfer: thermomechanical behavior of shape memory alloys, thermal aspects of manufacturing processes, natural and mixed convection

Kuo-Nan Liou, Ph.D. (New York U., 1970)

Radiative transfer and satellite remote sensing with application to clouds and aerosols in the earth's atmosphere

Ajit K. Mal, Ph.D. (Calcutta U., 1964)

Mechanics of solids, fractures and failure, wave propagation, nondestructive evaluation, composite materials

Robert T. M'Closkey, Ph.D. (Cal Tech, 1995)

Nonlinear control theory and design with application to mechanical and aerospace systems, real-time implementation

Anthony F. Mills, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1965)

Convective heat and mass transfer, condensation heat transfer, turbulent flows, ablation and transpiration cooling, perforated plate heat exchangers

Jeff S. Shamma, Ph.D. (MIT, 1988)

Feedback control theory and design with application to mechanical, aerospace, and manufacturing systems

Owen I. Smith, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1977)

Combustion and combustion-generated air pollutants, hydrodynamics and chemical kinetics of combustion systems, semiconductor chemical vapor deposition

Jason Speyer, Ph.D. (Harvard, 1968)

Stochastic and deterministic optimal control and estimation with application to aerospace systems; guidance, flight control, and flight mechanics

Tsu-Chin Tsao, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1988)

Modeling and control of dynamic systems with applications in mechanical systems, manufacturing processes, automotive systems, and energy systems, digital control, repetitive and learning control, adaptive and optimal control, mechatronics

Daniel C.H. Yang, Ph.D. (Rutgers, 1982)

Robotics and mechanisms; CAD/CAM systems, computer-controlled machines

Xiaolin Zhong, Ph.D. (Stanford, 1991)

Computational fluid dynamics, hypersonic flow, rarefied gas dynamics, numerical simulation of transient hypersonic flow with nonequilibrium real gas effects, instability of hypersonic boundary layers

Professors Emeriti

Andrew F. Charwat, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1952)

Experimental fluid mechanics, two-phase flow, ocean thermal energy conversion

Peretz P. Friedmann, Sc.D. (MIT, 1972)

Aeroelasticity of helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, structural dynamics of rotating systems, rotor dynamics, unsteady aerodynamics, active control of structural dynamics, structural optimization with aeroelastic constraints

Walter C. Hurty, M.S. (UCLA, 1948)

Dynamics of structures, including large structural systems, design and analysis of aerospace structures, stability of motion in self-excited systems

Robert E. Kelly, Sc.D. (MIT, 1964)

Thermal convection, thermocapillary convection, stability of shear flows, stratified and rotating flows, interfacial phenomena, microgravity fluid dynamics

Cornelius T. Leondes, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania, 1954)

Applied dynamic systems control

Michel A. Melkanoff, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1955)

Programming languages, data structures, database design, relational models, simulation systems, robotics, computer-aided design and manufacturing, numerical-controlled machinery

D. Lewis Mingori, Ph.D. (Stanford, 1966)

Dynamics and control, stability theory, nonlinear methods, applications to space and ground vehicles

Peter A. Monkewitz, Ph.D. (E.T.H., Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, 1977)

Fluid mechanics, internal acoustics and noise produced by turbulent jets

Philip F. O'Brien, M.S. (UCLA, 1949)

Industrial engineering, environmental design, thermal and luminous engineering systems

David Okrent, Ph.D. (Harvard, 1951)

Fast reactors, reactor physics, nuclear reactor safety, nuclear fuel element behavior, risk-benefit studies, nuclear environmental safety, fusion reactor technology

Russell R. O'Neill, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1956)

Systems engineering, maritime transportation systems

Lucien A. Schmit, Jr., M.S. (MIT, 1950)

Structural mechanics, optimization, automated design methods for structural systems and components, application of finite element analysis techniques and mathematical programming algorithms in structural design, analysis and synthesis methods for fiber composite structural components

Chauncey Starr, Ph.D. (Rensselaer, 1935)

Risk-benefit analysis of technical systems, national energy policy

Richard Stern, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1964)

Experimentation in noise control, physical acoustics, engineering acoustics, medical acoustics

Russell A. Westmann, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1962)

Mechanics of solid bodies, fracture mechanics, adhesive mechanics, composite materials, theoretical soil mechanics, mixed boundary value problems

Assistant Professors

Pei-Yu Chiou, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 2005)

BioMEMS, biophotonics, electrokinetics, optical manipulation, optoelectronic devices

Jeff D. Eldredge, Ph.D. (Cal Tech, 2002)

Aeroacoustics, particle-based numerical methods for fluids, control of acoustically-driven instabilities, vorticity dynamics

Emilio Frazzoli, Ph.D. (MIT, 2001)

Algorithmic, geometric, and computational methods for control of autonomous and distributed aerospace systems; flight control, astrodynamics, robotics, hybrid systems

Yongho Sungtaek Ju, Ph.D. (Stanford, 1999)

Heat transfer, thermodynamics, micro- and nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), magnetism, nano-bio technology

H. Pirouz Kavehpour, Ph.D. (MIT, 2003)

Microscale fluid mechanics, transport phenomena in biological systems, physics of contact line phenomena, complex fluids, non-isothermal flows, micro- and nano-heat guides, microtribology

William S. Klug, Ph.D. (Cal Tech, 2003)

Computational structural and solid mechanics, finite element methods, computational biomechanics, nanomechanics of biological systems

Laurent Pilon, Ph.D. (Purdue, 2002)

Interfacial and transport phenomena, radiation transfer, materials synthesis, multi-phase flow, heterogeneous media

Senior Lecturer

Alexander Samson, Ph.D. (U. New South Wales, 1968), Emeritus

Electromechanical system design, mechanical design, design of mechanical energy systems

Lecturers

Ravnesh Amar, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1974)

Heat transfer and thermal science

C.H. Chang, M.S. (UCLA, 1985), Emeritus

Computer-aided manufacturing and numerical control

Amiya K. Chatterjee, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1976)

Elastic wave propagation and penetration dynamics

Wilbur J. Marner, Ph.D. (South Carolina, 1969)

Thermal sciences, system design

Rudolf X. Meyer, Dr.Engr. (Johns Hopkins, 1955), Emeritus

Space technology

Adjunct Professors

Leslie M. Lackman, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1967)

Structural analysis and design, composite structures

Joseph Miller, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1962)

High-energy lasers, space instruments, space propulsion, multidisciplinary project management and leadership, engineering and society

Neil B. Morley, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1994)

Experimental and computational fluid mechanics

Raymond Viskanta, Ph.D. (Purdue, 1960)

Radiative transfer, heat transfer in combustion systems, heat transfer in manufacturing, simulation of electronic devices using Boltzmann Transport Equation

Xiang Zhang, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1996)

Nano-micro fabrication and MEMS, laser microtechnology, nano-micro devices (electronic, mechanical, photonic, and biomedical), rapid prototyping and microstereo lithography, design and manufacturing in nano-microscale, semiconductor manufacturing, physics and chemistry in nano-micro devices and fabrication.

Lower Division Courses

10. Introduction to Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. (2)

Lecture, two hours. Overview of fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, manufacturing and design, microelectromechanical systems, structural and solid mechanics, systems, dynamics and control. Careers in mechanical and aerospace engineering industry. P/NP grading. Mr. Hahn (W)

15. Technical Communication for Engineers. (2)

Lecture, two hours; outside study, four hours. Requisite: English Composition 3. Understanding writing process. Determining the purpose. Prewriting. Principles of organizing technical information. Eliminating unnecessary words, structuring paragraphs clearly, structuring effective sentences. Writing abstracts, introductions, and conclusions. Drafting and revising coherent documents. Writing collaboratively. Letter grading. Ms. Lavine (F,W)

19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars. (1)

Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

20. Programming with Numerical Methods Applications. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Mathematics 31A, 31B. Introduction to programming with MATLAB. Applications to numerical methods used in engineering. Letter grading. Ms. Lavine (F,W,Sp)

94. Introduction to Computer-Aided Design and Drafting. (4)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Fundamentals of computer graphics and two- and three-dimensional modeling on computer-aided design and drafting systems. Students use one or more online computer systems to design and display various objects. Letter grading. Mr. Yang (F,Sp)

99. Student Research Program. (1 to 2)

Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

Upper Division Courses

101. Statics and Strength of Materials. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: Mathematics 31A, 31B, Physics 1A. Review of vector representation of forces, resultant force and moment, equilibrium of concurrent and nonconcurrent forces. Determinate and indeterminate force systems. Area moments and products of inertia. Support reactions and free-body diagrams for simple models of mechanical and aerospace structures. Internal forces in beams, shear and moment diagrams. Cauchy's stress and linear strain components in solids, equilibrium equations, Hooke's law for isotropic solids. Saint Venant's problems of extension, bending, flexure, and torsion. Deflection of symmetric beams. Axial and hoop stresses in thin-walled pressure vessels. Letter grading. Mr. Mal (F,W,Sp)

102. Dynamics of Particles and Rigid Bodies. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, four hours; outside study, four hours. Requisites: course 101, Mathematics 33A, Physics 1A. Fundamental concepts of Newtonian mechanics. Kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies in two and three dimensions. Impulse-momentum and work-energy relationships. Applications. Letter grading. Mr. Klug (F,W,Sp)

103. Elementary Fluid Mechanics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: Mathematics 32B, 33A, Physics 1B. Introductory course dealing with application of principles of mechanics to flow of compressible and incompressible fluids. Letter grading. Mr. Kavehpour, Mr. J. Kim (F,W,Sp)

105A. Introduction to Engineering Thermodynamics. (4)

(Formerly numbered M105A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20B, Mathematics 32B. Phenomenological thermodynamics. Concepts of equilibrium, temperature, and reversibility. First law and concept of energy; second law and concept of entropy. Equations of state and thermodynamic properties. Engineering applications of these principles in analysis and design of closed and open systems. Letter grading. Mr. Pilon (F,W,Sp)

105D. Transport Phenomena. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 103, 105A, Mathematics 32B, 33B. Transport phenomena; heat conduction, mass species diffusion, convective heat and mass transfer, and radiation. Engineering applications in thermal and environmental control. Letter grading. Mr. Ju (F,W,Sp)

107. Introduction to Modeling and Analysis of Dynamic Systems. (3)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, four hours. Requisites: courses 20, 102. Corequisite: course 107L. Introduction to modeling of physical systems, including mechanical, fluid, thermal, and electrical systems. Linear differential equations. Description of these systems with coverage of superposition, convolution, frequency response, first- and second-order system transient response analysis, and numerical solution. Nonlinear differential equation descriptions with discussion of equilibrium solutions, small signal linearization, large signal response, and numerical solution. Block diagram representation and response of interconnections of systems. Letter grading. Mr. M'Closkey, Mr. Tsao (F,W,Sp)

107L. Dynamic Systems Laboratory. (1)

Laboratory, two hours; outside study, two hours. Requisites: courses 20, 102. Investigation of dynamic behavior of physical systems by computer simulation and hands-on experiments. Computer-based data acquisition. Time and frequency domain modeling and analysis of mechanical, electrical, thermal, and fluid lumped parameter systems. Letter grading. Mr. M'Closkey, Mr. Tsao (F,W,Sp)

131A. Intermediate Heat Transfer. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: courses 20, 105D, 182A. Steady conduction: two-sided, two-ended, tapered, and circular fins; buried cylinders, thick fins. Transient conduction: slabs, cylinders, products. Convection: transpiration, laminar pipe flow, film condensation, boundary layers, dimensional analysis, working correlation, surface radiation. Two-stream heat exchangers. Elements of thermal design. Letter grading.

Ms. Lavine (F,W)

131AL. Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer Laboratory. (4)

Laboratory, eight hours; outside study, four hours. Requisites: courses 131A, 157. Experimental study of physical phenomena and engineering systems using modern data acquisition and processing techniques. Experiments include studies of heat transfer phenomena and testing of a cooling tower, heat exchanger, and internal combustion engine. Students take and analyze data and discuss physical phenomena. Letter grading. Mr. Mills (Sp, alternate years)

132A. Mass Transfer. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 131A. Principles of mass transfer by diffusion and convection. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer. Analysis of evaporative and transpiration cooling, combustion, and catalysis. Mass exchangers, including automobile catalytic converters, precipitators, filters, scrubbers, humidifiers, and cooling towers. Letter grading. Mr. Mills (F, alternate years)

133A. Engineering Thermodynamics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: courses 103, 105A, 105D. Applications of thermodynamic principles to engineering processes. Energy conversion systems. Rankine cycle and other cycles, refrigeration, psychrometry, reactive and nonreactive fluid flow systems. Letter grading. Mr. Catton (F,Sp)

133AL. Power Conversion Thermodynamics Laboratory. (4)

Laboratory, eight hours; outside study, four hours. Requisites: courses 133A, 157. Experimental study of power conversion and heat transfer systems using state-of-the-art plant process instrumentation and equipment. Experiments include studies of thermodynamic operating characteristics of an actual Brayton cycle, Rankine cycle, compressive refrigeration unit, and absorption refrigeration unit. Letter grading. Mr. Catton (W, alternate years)

134. Design and Operation of Thermal Hydraulic Power Systems. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: courses 133A, 133AL. Thermal hydraulic design, maintenance and operation of power systems, gas turbines, steam turbines, centrifugal refrigeration units, absorption refrigeration units, compressors, valves and piping systems, and instrumentation and control systems. Letter grading. Mr. Catton (Sp)

CM140. Introduction to Biomechanics. (4)

(Same as Biomedical Engineering CM140.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: courses 101, 102, 156A. Introduction to mechanical functions of human body; skeletal adaptations to optimize load transfer, mobility, and function. Dynamics and kinematics. Fluid mechanics applications. Heat and mass transfer. Power generation. Laboratory simulations and tests. Concurrently scheduled with course CM240. Letter grading. Mr. Gupta, Mr. Kabo (W)

150A. Intermediate Fluid Mechanics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 20, 103, 182A. Basic equations governing fluid motion. Fundamental solutions of Navier/Stokes equations. Lubrication theory. Elementary potential flow theory. Boundary layers. Turbulent flow in pipes and boundary layers. Compressible flow: normal shocks, channel flow with friction or heat addition. Letter grading. Mr. Eldredge, Ms. Karagozian (W)

150B. Aerodynamics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: courses 103, 150A. Advanced aspects of potential flow theory. Incompressible flow around thin airfoils (Cl, C m ) and wings (lift, induced drag). Gas dynamics: oblique shocks, Prandtl/Meyer expansion. Linearized subsonic and supersonic flow around thin airfoils and wings. Wave drag. Transonic flow. Letter grading. Mr. Zhong (Sp)

150C. Combustion Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 103, 105A, 105D. Chemical thermodynamics of ideal gas mixtures, premixed and diffusion flames, explosions and detonations, combustion chemistry, high explosives. Combustion processes in rocket, turbine, and internal combustion engines; heating applications. Letter grading. Ms. Karagozian, Mr. Smith (W)

150D. Fluid Dynamics of Biological Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 103. Mechanics of aquatic locomotion; insect and bird flight aerodynamics; pulsatile flow in circulatory system; rheology of blood; transport in microcirculation; role of fluid dynamics in arterial diseases. Letter grading. Mr. Eldredge (F)

150P. Aircraft Propulsion Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: courses 103, 105A. Thermodynamic properties of gases, aircraft jet engine cycle analysis and component performance, component matching, advanced aircraft engine topics. Letter grading. Ms. Karagozian, Mr. Smith (F)

150R. Rocket Propulsion Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 103, 105A, 105D. Rocket propulsion concepts, including chemical rockets (liquid, gas, and solid propellants), hybrid rocket engines, electric (ion, plasma) rockets, nuclear rockets, and solar-powered vehicles. Current issues in launch vehicle technologies. Letter grading. Ms. Karagozian, Mr. Smith (Sp)

153A. Engineering Acoustics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Designed for junior/senior engineering majors. Fundamental course in acoustics; propagation of sound; sources of sound. Design of field measurements. Estimation of jet and blade noise with design aspects. Letter grading. Mr. Eldredge (Sp, alternate years)

154A. Preliminary Design of Aircraft. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 154S. Classical preliminary design of aircraft, including weight estimation, performance and stability, and control consideration. Term assignment consists of preliminary design of low-speed aircraft. Letter grading. Mr. Bendiksen (W)

154B. Design of Aerospace Structures. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 154A, 166A. Design of aircraft, helicopter, spacecraft, and related structures. External loads, internal stresses. Applied theory of thin-walled structures. Material selection, design using composite materials. Design for fatigue prevention and structural optimization. Field trips to aerospace companies. Letter grading. Mr. Bendiksen (Sp)

154S. Flight Mechanics, Stability, and Control of Aircraft. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 150A, 150B. Aircraft performance, flight mechanics, stability, and control; some basic ingredients needed for design of aircraft. Effects of airplane flexibility on stability derivatives. Letter grading. Mr. Bendiksen (F)

155. Intermediate Dynamics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 102. Axioms of Newtonian mechanics, generalized coordinates, Lagrange equation, variational principles; central force motion; kinematics and dynamics of a rigid body. Euler equations, motion of rotating bodies, oscillatory motion, normal coordinates, orthogonality relations. Letter grading. Mr. Gibson (F)

156A. Strength of Materials. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, four hours; outside study, four hours. Requisites: courses 101, 182A. Concepts of stress, strain, and material behavior. Stresses in loaded beams with symmetric and asymmetric cross sections. Torsion of cylinders and thin-walled structures, shear flow. Stresses in pressure vessels, press-fit and shrink-fit problems, rotating shafts. Curved beams. Contact stresses. Strength and failure, plastic deformation, fatigue, elastic instability. Letter grading. Mr. Mal (F,Sp)

157. Basic Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. (4)

Laboratory, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 101, 103, 105A, 105D, Electrical Engineering 100. Methods of measurement of basic quantities and performance of basic experiments in heat transfer, fluid mechanics, structures, and thermodynamics. Primary sensors, transducers, recording equipment, signal processing, and data analysis. Letter grading. Mr. Ghoniem, Mr. Mills (F,W,Sp)

157A. Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics Laboratory. (4)

Laboratory, eight hours. Requisites: courses 150A, 150B, 157. Experimental illustration of important physical phenomena in area of fluid mechanics/aerodynamics, as well as hands-on experience with design of experimental programs and use of modern experimental tools and techniques in field. Letter grading. Mr. Kavehpour, Mr. Smith (Sp)

157S. Basic Aerospace Engineering Laboratory. (4)

Laboratory, eight hours; outside study, four hours. Requisites: courses 101, 102, 103, M105A, Electrical Engineering 100. Recommended: course 15. Measurements of basic physical quantities in fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and structures. Operation of primary transducers, computer-aided data acquisition, signal processing, and data analysis. Performance of experiments to enhance understanding of basic physical principles and characteristics of structures/systems of relevance to aerospace engineering. Letter grading. Mr. Ju (F,W)

161A. Introduction to Astronautics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisite: course 102. Recommended: course 182A. Space environment of Earth, trajectories and orbits, step rockets and staging, two-body problem, orbital transfer and rendezvous, problem of three bodies, elementary perturbation theory, influence of Earth's oblateness. Letter grading. Mr. Frazzoli (F)

161B. Introduction to Space Technology. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Recommended preparation: courses 102, 105D, 150P, 161A. Propulsion requirements for typical space missions, thermochemistry of propellants, internal ballistics, regenerative cooling, liquid propellant feed systems, POGO instability. Electric propulsion. Multistage rockets, separation dynamics. Satellite structures and materials, loads and vibrations. Thermal control of spacecraft. Letter grading. Mr. Frazzoli (W)

161C. Spacecraft Design. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 161B. Coverage of preliminary design, by students, of small spacecraft carrying lightweight scientific payload with modest requirements for electric power, lifetime, and attitude stability. Students work in groups of three or four, with each student responsible primarily for one subsystem and for integration with whole. Letter grading. Mr. Bendiksen (Sp)

161D. Space Technology Hardware Design. (4)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, three hours; outside study, seven hours. Recommended requisite or corequisite: course 161B. Design, by students, of hardware with applications to space technology. Designs are then built by HSSEAS professional machine shop and tested by students. New project carried out each year. Letter grading. Mr. Frazzoli (W)

162A. Introduction to Mechanisms and Mechanical Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: courses 20, 102. Analysis and synthesis of mechanisms and mechanical systems. Kinematics, dynamics, and mechanical advantages of machinery. Displacement velocity and acceleration analyses of linkages. Fundamental law of gearing and various gear trains. Computer-aided mechanism design and analysis. Letter grading. Mr. Yang (F,Sp)

162B. Mechanical Product Design. (4)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: courses 94, 156A, 162A, 183, Electrical Engineering 110L. Lecture and laboratory (design) course involving modern design theory and methodology for development of mechanical products. Economics, marketing, manufacturability, quality, and patentability. Design considerations taught and applied to hands-on design project. Letter grading. Mr. Ghoniem (F,W)

162C. Electromechanical System Design Laboratory. (4)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, eight hours; outside study, three hours. Requisite: course 162B. Laboratory and design course consisting of design, development, construction, and testing of complex mechanical and electromechanical systems. Assembled machine is instrumented and monitored for operational characteristics. Letter grading. Mr. Tsao (Sp)

162M. Senior Mechanical Engineering Design. (4)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, six hours; outside study, five hours. Requisites: courses 131A, 133A, 162B, 169A, 171A. Must be taken in last two academic terms of students' programs. Analytical course of a large engineering system. Design factors include functionality, efficiency, economy, safety, reliability, aesthetics, and social impact. Final report of engineering specifications and drawings to be presented by design teams. Letter grading. Mr. Yang (W,Sp)

163A. Introduction to Computer-Controlled Machines. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite or corequisite: course 171A. Modeling of computer-controlled machines, including electrical and electronic elements, mechanical elements, actuators, sensors, and overall electromechanical systems. Motion and command generation, servo-controller design, and computer/machine interfacing. Letter grading. Mr. Tsao (F)

166A. Analysis of Flight Structures. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisite: course 101. Introduction to two-dimensional elasticity, stress-strain laws, yield and fatigue; bending of beams; torsion of beams; warping; torsion of thin-walled cross sections: shear flow, shear-lag; combined bending torsion of thin-walled, stiffened structures used in aerospace vehicles; elements of plate theory; buckling of columns. Letter grading. Mr. Carman (F)

166C. Design of Composite Structures. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisite: course 156A or 166A. History of composites, stress-strain relations for composite materials, bending and extension of symmetric laminates, failure analysis, design examples and design studies, buckling of composite components, nonsymmetric laminates, micromechanics of composites. Letter grading. Mr. Carman (W)

168. Introduction to Finite Element Technology. (4)

Lecture, four hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, four hours. Requisites: courses 20, 101, Mathematics 33A. Recommended: courses 94 or 184, 166A. Introduction to finite element method (FEM) and its matrix formulation of computer implementation of FEM concepts; practical use of FEM codes. Preprocessing and postprocessing techniques; graphics display capabilities; geometric and analysis modeling; interactive engineering systems; links with computer-aided design. Recent trends in FEM technology; design optimization. Term projects using FEM computer codes. Letter grading. Mr. Klug (Sp)

169A. Introduction to Mechanical Vibrations. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: courses 102, 182A, Civil Engineering 108. Recommended: Electrical Engineering 102. Fundamentals of vibration theory and applications. Free, forced, and transient vibration of one and two degrees of freedom systems, including damping. Normal modes, coupling, and normal coordinates. Vibration isolation devices, vibrations of continuous systems. Letter grading. Mr. Bendiksen (F,W)

171A. Introduction to Feedback and Control Systems: Dynamic Systems Control I. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisite: course 181A or 182A or Electrical Engineering 102. Introduction to feedback principles, control systems design, and system stability. Modeling of physical systems in engineering and other fields; transform methods; controller design using Nyquist, Bode, and root locus methods; compensation; computer-aided analysis and design. Letter grading. Mr. Shamma (F,W,Sp)

171B. Digital Control of Physical Systems. (4)

(Formerly numbered 164.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 171A or Electrical Engineering 141. Analysis and design of digital control systems. Sampling theory. Z-transformation. Discrete-time system representation. Design using classical methods: performance specifications, root locus, frequency response, loop-shaping compensation. Design using state-space methods: state feedback, state estimator, state estimator feedback control. Simulation of sampled data systems and practical aspects: roundoff errors, sampling rate selection, computation delay. Letter grading. Mr. Tsao (Sp)

172. Control System Design Laboratory. (4)

Laboratory, eight hours; outside study, four hours. Requisite: course 171A. Application of frequency domain design techniques for control of mechanical systems. Successful controller design requires students to formulate performance measures for control problem, experimentally identify mechanical systems, and develop uncertainty descriptions for design models. Exploration of issues concerning model uncertainty and sensor/actuator placement. Students implement control designs on flexible structures, rate gyroscope, and inverted pendulum. Detailed reports required. Letter grading. Mr. M'Closkey (W)

174. Probability and Its Applications to Risk, Reliability, and Quality Control. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Introduction to probability theory; random variables, distributions, functions of random variables, models of failure of components, reliability, redundancy, complex systems, stress-strength models, fault tree analysis, statistical quality control by variables and by attributes, acceptance sampling. Letter grading. Mr. Shamma (W)

CM180. Introduction to Micromachining and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS). (4)

(Formerly numbered M180.) (Same as Biomedical Engineering CM150 and Electrical Engineering CM150.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20L, Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL. Corequisite: course CM180L. Introduction to micromachining technologies and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Methods of micromachining and how these methods can be used to produce variety of MEMS, including microstructures, microsensors, and microactuators. Students design microfabrication processes capable of achieving desired MEMS device. Concurrently scheduled with course CM280A. Letter grading. Mr. C-J. Kim (F)

CM180L. Introduction to Micromachining and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Laboratory. (2)

(Formerly numbered M180L.) (Same as Biomedical Engineering CM150L and Electrical Engineering CM150L.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours; outside study, one hour. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20L, Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL. Corequisite: course CM180. Hands-on introduction to micromachining technologies and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) laboratory. Methods of micromachining and how these methods can be used to produce variety of MEMS, including microstructures, microsensors, and microactuators. Students go through process of fabricating MEMS device. Concurrently scheduled with course CM280L. Letter grading. Mr. C-J. Kim (F)

181A. Complex Analysis and Integral Transforms. (4)

(Formerly numbered 191A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 182A. Complex variables, analytic functions, conformal mapping, contour integrals, singularities, residues, Cauchy integrals; Laplace transform: properties, convolution, inversion; Fourier transform: properties, convolution, FFT, applications in dynamics, vibrations, structures, and heat conduction. Letter grading. Mr. Ghoniem (W)

182A. Mathematics of Engineering. (4)

(Formerly numbered 192A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: Mathematics 33A, 33B. Methods of solving ordinary differential equations in engineering. Review of matrix algebra. Solutions of systems of first- and second-order ordinary differential equations. Introduction to Laplace transforms and their application to ordinary differential equations. Introduction to boundary value problems. Letter grading. Mr. Mal (F,W,Sp)

182B. Mathematics of Engineering. (4)

(Formerly numbered 192B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 182A. Analytical methods for solving partial differential equations arising in engineering. Separation of variables, eigenvalue problems, Sturm/Liouville theory. Development and use of special functions. Representation by means of orthonormal functions; Galerkin method. Use of Green's function and transform methods. Letter grading. Mr. Eldredge, Mr. J. Kim (Sp)

182C. Numerical Methods for Engineering Applications. (4)

(Formerly numbered 192C.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 20, 182A. Recommended: Electrical Engineering 103. Basic topics from numerical analysis having wide application in solution of practical engineering problems, computer arithmetic, and errors. Solution of linear and nonlinear systems. Algebraic eigenvalue problem. Least-square methods, numerical quadrature, and finite difference approximations. Numerical solution of initial and boundary value problems for ordinary and partial differential equations. Letter grading. Mr. Zhong (F)

183. Introduction to Manufacturing Processes. (4)

(Formerly numbered 193.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: Materials Science 104. Manufacturing fundamentals. Materials in manufacturing. Manufacturing systems. Rapid prototyping. Material removal processes. Solidification and forming. Joining and assembly. Particulate and surface processes. Electronics manufacturing. Letter grading. Mr. Hahn, Mr. C-J. Kim (F,Sp)

184. Introduction to Geometry Modeling. (4)

(Formerly numbered 194.) Laboratory, eight hours; outside study, four hours. Requisites: courses 20, 94. Fundamentals in parametric curve and surface modeling, parametric spaces, blending functions, conics, splines and Bezier curve, coordinate transformations, algebraic and geometric form of surfaces, analytical properties of curve and surface, hands-on experience with CAD/CAM systems design and implementation. Letter grading. Mr. Yang (W)

185. Computer Numerical Control and Applications. (4)

(Formerly numbered 195.) Laboratory, eight hours; outside study, four hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Fundamentals of numerical control (NC) technology. Programming of computer numerical control (CNC) machines in NC codes and APT language and with CAD/CAM systems. NC postprocessors and distributed numerical control. Operation of CNC lathe and milling machines. Programming and machining of complex engineering parts. Letter grading. Mr. Yang (Sp)

C187L. Nanoscale Fabrication, Characterization, and Biodetection Laboratory. (2 to 4)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Multidisciplinary course that introduces laboratory techniques of nanoscale fabrication, characterization, and biodetection. Basic physical, chemical, and biological principles related to these techniques, top-down and bottom-up (self-assembly) nanofabrication, nanocharacterization (AEM, SEM, etc.), and optical and electrochemical biosensors. Students encouraged to create their own ideas in self-designed experiments. Concurrently scheduled with course C287L. Letter grading. Mr. Chen (Sp)

188. Special Courses in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. (2 to 4)

(Formerly numbered 198.) Lecture, two to four hours; outside study, four to eight hours. Special topics in mechanical and aerospace engineering for undergraduate students that are taught on experimental or temporary basis, such as those taught by resident and visiting faculty members. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

194. Research Group Seminars: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. (2 to 4)

Seminar, two hours. Designed for undergraduate students who are part of research group. Discussion of research methods and current literature in field. Student presentation of projects in research specialty. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

199. Directed Research in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. (2 to 8)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be repeated for credit with school approval. Individual contract required; enrollment petitions available in Office of Academic and Student Affairs. Letter grading. (F,W,Sp)

Graduate Courses

231A. Convective Heat Transfer Theory. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 131A, 182B. Recommended: course 250A. Conservation equations for flow of real fluids. Analysis of heat transfer in laminar and turbulent, incompressible and compressible flows. Internal and external flows; free convection. Variable wall temperature; effects of variable fluid properties. Analogies among convective transfer processes. Letter grading. Ms. Lavine (W)

231B. Radiation Heat Transfer. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 105D. Radiative properties of materials and radiative energy transfer. Emphasis on fundamental concepts, including energy levels and electromagnetic waves as well as analytical methods for calculating radiative properties and radiation transfer in absorbing, emitting, and scattering media. Applications cover laser-material interactions in addition to traditional areas such as combustion and thermal insulation. Letter grading. Mr. Pilon (W)

231C. Phase Change Heat Transfer and Two-Phase Flow. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 131A, 150A. Two-phase flow, boiling, and condensation. Generalized constitutive equations for two-phase flow. Phenomenological theories of boiling and condensation, including forced flow effects. Letter grading. Mr. Mills (W)

231F. Advanced Heat Transfer. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 231A. Advanced topics in heat transfer from current literature. Linear and nonlinear theories of thermal and hydrodynamic instability; variational methods in transport phenomena; phenomenological theories of turbulent heat and mass transport. Letter grading. Mr. Catton (Sp, alternate years)

231G. Microscopic Energy Transport. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 105D. Heat carriers (photons, electronics, phonons, molecules) and their energy characteristics, statistical properties of heat carriers, scattering and propagation of heat carriers, Boltzmann transport equations, derivation of classical laws from Boltzmann transport equations, deviation from classical laws at small scale. Letter grading. Mr. Ju (Sp)

232B. Advanced Mass Transfer. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 131A, 132A. Formulation of general convective heat and mass transfer problem, including equilibrium and nonequilibrium chemistry. Similar and nonsimilar solutions for laminar flows; solution procedures for turbulent flows. Multicomponent diffusion. Application to hypersonic boundary layer, ablation and transpiration cooling, combustion. Letter grading. Mr. Mills (Sp)

235A. Nuclear Reactor Theory. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 182A. Underlying physics and mathematics of nuclear reactor (fission) core design. Diffusion theory, reactor kinetics, slowing down and thermalization, multigroup methods, introduction to transport theory. Letter grading. Mr. Abdou

M237B. Fusion Plasma Physics and Analysis. (4)

(Same as Electrical Engineering M287.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: Electrical Engineering M185. Fundamentals of plasmas at thermonuclear burning conditions. Fokker/Planck equation and applications to heating by neutral beams, RF, and fusion reaction products. Bremsstrahlung, synchrotron, and atomic radiation processes. Plasma surface interactions. Fluid description of burning plasma. Dynamics, stability, and control. Applications in tokamaks, tandem mirrors, and alternate concepts. Letter grading. Mr. Abdou (W)

237D. Fusion Engineering and Design. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Fusion reactions and fuel cycles. Principles of inertial and magnetic fusion. Plasma requirements for controlled fusion. Plasma-surface interactions. Fusion reactor concepts and technological components. Analysis and design of high heat flux components, energy conversion and tritium breeding components, radiation shielding, magnets, and heating. Letter grading. Mr. Abdou (Sp, alternate years)

239B. Seminar: Current Topics in Transport Phenomena. (2 to 4)

Seminar, two to four hours; outside study, four to eight hours. Designed for graduate mechanical and aerospace engineering students. Lectures, discussions, student presentations, and projects in areas of current interest in transport phenomena. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

239F. Special Topics in Transport Phenomena. (2 to 4)

Lecture, two to four hours; outside study, four to eight hours. Designed for graduate mechanical and aerospace engineering students. Advanced and current study of one or more aspects of heat and mass transfer, such as turbulence, stability and transition, buoyancy effects, variational methods, and measurement techniques. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U grading.

239G. Special Topics in Nuclear Engineering. (2 to 4)

Lecture, two to four hours; outside study, four to eight hours. Designed for graduate mechanical and aerospace engineering students. Advanced study in areas of current interest in nuclear engineering, such as reactor safety, risk-benefit trade-offs, nuclear materials, and reactor design. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U grading.

239H. Special Topics in Fusion Physics, Engineering, and Technology. (2 to 4)

Seminar, two to four hours; outside study, four to eight hours. Designed for graduate mechanical and aerospace engineering students. Advanced treatment of subjects selected from research areas in fusion science and engineering, such as instabilities in burning plasmas, alternate fusion confinement concepts, inertial confinement fusion, fission-fusion hybrid systems, and fusion reactor safety. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U grading.

CM240. Introduction to Biomechanics. (4)

(Same as Biomedical Engineering CM240.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: courses 101, 102, 156A. Introduction to mechanical functions of human body; skeletal adaptations to optimize load transfer, mobility, and function. Dynamics and kinematics. Fluid mechanics applications. Heat and mass transfer. Power generation. Laboratory simulations and tests. Concurrently scheduled with course CM140. Letter grading. Mr. Gupta, Mr. Kabo (W)

250A. Foundations of Fluid Dynamics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 150A. Corequisite: course 182B. Development and application of fundamental principles of fluid mechanics at graduate level, with emphasis on incompressible flow. Flow kinematics, basic equations, constitutive relations, exact solutions on the Navier/Stokes equations, vorticity dynamics, decomposition of flow fields, potential flow. Letter grading. Mr. Eldredge, Mr. J. Kim (F)

250B. Viscous and Turbulent Flows. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 150A. Fundamental principles of fluid dynamics applied to study of fluid resistance. States of fluid motion discussed in order of advancing Reynolds number; wakes, boundary layers, instability, transition, and turbulent shear flows. Letter grading. Ms. Karagozian, Mr. J. Kim (W)

250C. Compressible Flows. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 150A, 150B. Effects of compressibility in viscous and inviscid flows. Steady and unsteady inviscid subsonic and supersonic flows; method of characteristics; small disturbance theories (linearized and hypersonic); shock dynamics. Letter grading. Ms. Karagozian, Mr. Zhong (Sp)

250D. Computational Aerodynamics. (4)

Lecture, eight hours. Requisites: courses 150A, 150B, 182C. Introduction to useful methods for computation of aerodynamic flow fields. Coverage of potential, Euler, and Navier/Stokes equations for subsonic to hypersonic speeds. Letter grading. Mr. Zhong (W, alternate years)

250E. Spectral Methods in Fluid Dynamics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 182A, 182B, 182C, 250A, 250B. Introduction to basic concepts and techniques of various spectral methods applied to solving partial differential equations. Particular emphasis on techniques of solving unsteady three-dimensional Navier/Stokes equations. Topics include spectral representation of functions, discrete Fourier transform, etc. Letter grading. Mr. J. Kim (Sp, alternate years)

250F. Hypersonic and High-Temperature Gas Dynamics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Recommended requisite: course 250C. Molecular and chemical description of equilibrium and nonequilibrium hypersonic and high-temperature gas flows, chemical thermodynamics and statistical thermodynamics for calculation gas properties, equilibrium flows of real gases, vibrational and chemical rate processes, nonequilibrium flows of real gases, and computational fluid dynamics methods for nonequilibrium hypersonic flows. Letter grading. Mr. Zhong (W)

250M. Introduction to Microfluids/Nanofluids. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 150A. Introduction to fundamentals of microfluids. No-slip and slip boundary conditions. Sedimentation and diffusion in liquids. Osmotic pressure and Donnan equilibrium in fluid mixtures. Fundamentals of surface phenomena, spreading, and contact angles. Introduction to van der Waals interactions, electrical double layer, and zeta potential. Basics of non-Newtonian fluid mechanics. Letter grading. Mr. Kavehpour (F)

252A. Stability of Fluid Motion. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 150A. Mechanisms by which laminar flows can become unstable and lead to turbulence of secondary motions. Linear stability theory; thermal, centrifugal, and shear instabilities; boundary layer instability. Nonlinear aspects: sufficient criteria for stability, subcritical instabilities, supercritical states, transition to turbulence. Letter grading. Mr. Zhong (W, odd years)

252B. Turbulence. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 250A, 250B. Characteristics of turbulent flows, conservation and transport equations, statistical description of turbulent flows, scales of turbulent motion, simple turbulent flows, free-shear flows, wall-bounded flows, turbulence modeling, numerical simulations of turbulent flows, and turbulence control. Letter grading. Mr. J. Kim (Sp)

252C. Fluid Mechanics of Combustion Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 150A, 150B. Recommended: course 250C. Review of fluid mechanics and chemical thermodynamics applied to reactive systems, laminar diffusion flames, premixed laminar flames, stability, ignition, turbulent combustion, supersonic combustion. Letter grading. Ms. Karagozian (F, odd years)

252D. Combustion Rate Processes. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 252C. Basic concepts in chemical kinetics: molecular collisions, distribution functions and averaging, semiempirical and ab initio potential surfaces, trajectory calculations, statistical reaction rate theories. Practical examples of large-scale chain mechanisms from combustion chemistry of several elements, etc. Letter grading. Mr. Smith (Sp, even years)

253A. Advanced Engineering Acoustics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Advanced studies in engineering acoustics, including three-dimensional wave propagation; propagation in bounded media; Ray acoustics; attenuation mechanisms in fluids. Letter grading. Mr. Eldredge

253B. Fundamentals of Aeroacoustics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 150A. Detailed discussion of plane waves, point sources. Nonlinearity, layered and moving media, multiple reflections. Inhomogeneous wave equation. Monopole, dipole, quadrupole source fields from scattering inhomogeneities and turbulence; Lighthill theory; moving sources. Similarity methods. Selected detailed applications. Letter grading. Mr. Eldredge

254A. Special Topics in Aerodynamics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 150A, 150B, 182A, 182B, 182C. Special topics of current interest in advanced aerodynamics. Examples include transonic flow, hypersonic flow, sonic booms, and unsteady aerodynamics. Letter grading. Mr. Zhong

255A. Advanced Dynamics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 155, 169A. Variational principles and Lagrange equations. Kinematics and dynamics of rigid bodies; procession and nutation of spinning bodies. Letter grading. Mr. Frazzoli (W)

255B. Mathematical Methods in Dynamics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 255A. Concepts of stability; state-space interpretation; stability determination by simulation, linearization, and Lyapunov direct method; the Hamiltonian as a Lyapunov function; nonautonomous systems; averaging and perturbation methods of nonlinear analysis; parametric excitation and nonlinear resonance. Application to mechanical systems. Letter grading. Mr. M'Closkey (Sp, odd years)

M256A. Linear Elasticity. (4)

(Formerly numbered 256A.) (Same as Civil Engineering M230A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 156A or 166A. Linear elastostatics. Cartesian tensors; infinitesimal strain tensor; Cauchy stress tensor; strain energy; equilibrium equations; linear constitutive relations; plane elastostatic problems, holes, corners, inclusions, cracks; three-dimensional problems of Kelvin, Boussinesq, and Cerruti. Introduction to boundary integral equation method. Letter grading. Mr. Mal (F)

M256B. Nonlinear Elasticity. (4)

(Same as Civil Engineering M230B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M256A. Kinematics of deformation, material and spatial coordinates, deformation gradient tensor, nonlinear and linear strain tensors, strain displacement relations; balance laws, Cauchy and Piola stresses, Cauchy equations of motion, balance of energy, stored energy; constitutive relations, elasticity, hyperelasticity, thermoelasticity; linearization of field equations; solution of selected problems. Letter grading. Mr. Dong, Mr. Mal (W)

M256C. Plasticity. (4)

(Same as Civil Engineering M230C.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses M256A, M256B. Classical rate-independent plasticity theory, yield functions, flow rules and thermodynamics. Classical rate-dependent viscoplasticity, Perzyna and Duvant/Lions types of viscoplasticity. Thermoplasticity and creep. Return mapping algorithms for plasticity and viscoplasticity. Finite element implementations. Letter grading. Mr. Gupta (Sp)

256F. Analytical Fracture Mechanics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: course 156A or 166A, Materials Science 243A. Review of modern fracture mechanics, elementary stress analyses; analytical and numerical methods for calculation of crack tip stress intensity factors; engineering applications in stiffened structures, pressure vessels, plates, and shells. Letter grading. Mr. Gupta (Sp)

M257A. Elastodynamics. (4)

(Same as Earth and Space Sciences M224A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses M256A, M256B. Equations of linear elasticity, Cauchy equation of motion, constitutive relations, boundary and initial conditions, principle of energy. Sources and waves in unbounded isotropic, anisotropic, and dissipative solids. Half-space problems. Guided waves in layered media. Applications to dynamic fracture, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), and mechanics of earthquakes. Letter grading. Mr. Mal (Sp)

258A. Nanomechanics and Micromechanics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M256A. Analytical and computational modeling methods to describe mechanics of materials at scales ranging from atomistic through microstructure or transitional and up to continuum. Discussion of atomistic simulation methods (e.g., molecular dynamics, Langevin dynamics, and kinetic Monte Carlo) and their applications at nanoscale. Developments and applications of dislocation dynamics and statistical mechanics methods in areas of nanostructure and mircostructure self-organization, heterogeneous plastic deformation, material instabilities, and failure phenomena. Presentation of technical applications of these emerging modeling techniques to surfaces and interfaces, grain boundaries, dislocations and defects, surface growth, quantum dots, nanotubes, nanoclusters, thin films (e.g., optical thermal barrier coatings and ultrastrong nanolayer materials), nano-identification, smart (active) materials, nanobending and microbending, and torsion. Letter grading. Mr. Ghoniem (F)

259A. Seminar: Advanced Topics in Fluid Mechanics. (4)

Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Advanced study of topics in fluid mechanics, with intensive student participation involving assignments in research problems leading to term paper or oral presentation (possible help from guest lecturers). Letter grading. Mr. Smith (Sp)

259B. Seminar: Advanced Topics in Solid Mechanics. (4)

Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Advanced study in various fields of solid mechanics on topics which may vary from term to term. Topics include dynamics, elasticity, plasticity, and stability of solids. Letter grading. Mr. Mal

260. Current Topics in Mechanical Engineering. (2 to 4)

Seminar, two to four hours; outside study, four to eight hours. Designed for graduate mechanical and aerospace engineering students. Lectures, discussions, and student presentations and projects in areas of current interest in mechanical engineering. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

261A. Energy and Computational Methods in Structural Mechanics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 156A or 166A. Review of theory of linear elasticity and reduced structural theories (rods, plates, and shells). Calculus of variations. Virtual work. Minimum and stationary variational principles. Variational approximation methods. Weighted residual methods, weak forms. Static finite element method. Isoparametric elements, beam and plate elements. Numerical quadrature. Letter grading. Mr. Bendiksen (F)

261B. Computational Mechanics of Solids and Structures. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 261A. Variational formulation and computer implementation of linear elastic finite element method. Error analysis and convergence. Methods for large displacements, large deformations, and other geometric nonlinearities. Solution techniques for nonlinear equations. Finite element method for dynamics of solids and structures. Time integration algorithms. Term projects using digital computers. Letter grading. Mr. Klug (W)

262. Mechanics of Intelligent Material Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Recommended requisite: course 166C. Constitutive relations for electro-magneto-mechanical materials. Fiber-optic sensor technology. Micro/macro analysis, including classical lamination theory, shear lag theory, concentric cylinder analysis, hexagonal models, and homogenization techniques as they apply to active materials. Active systems design, inch-worm, and bimorph. Letter grading. Mr. Carman (W)

263A. Analytical Foundations of Motion Controllers. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Recommended requisites: courses 163A, 294. Theory of motion control for modern computer-controlled machines; multiaxis computer-controlled machines; machine kinematics and dynamics; multiaxis motion coordination; coordinated motion with desired speed and acceleration; jerk analysis; motion command generation; theory and design of controller interpolators; motion trajectory design and analysis; geometry-speed-sampling time relationships. Letter grading. Mr. Yang (W)

263B. Spacecraft Dynamics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 255A. Recommended: course 255B. Modeling, dynamics, and stability of spacecraft; spinning and dual-spin spacecraft dynamics; spinup through resonance, spinning rocket dynamics; environmental torques in space, modeling and model reduction of flexible space structures. Letter grading. Mr. Frazzoli (Sp, alternate years)

263C. Mechanics and Trajectory Planning of Industrial Robots. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 163A. Theory and implementation of industrial robots. Design considerations. Kinematic structure modeling, trajectory planning, and system dynamics. Differential motion and static forces. Individual student study projects. Letter grading. Mr. Yang (W)

263D. Advanced Robotics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Recommended preparation: courses 155, 171A, 263C. Motion planning and control of articulated dynamic systems: nonlinear joint control, experiments in joint control and multiaxis coordination, multibody dynamics, trajectory planning, motion optimization, dynamic performance and manipulator design, kinematic redundancies, motion planning of manipulators in space, obstacle avoidance. Letter grading. Mr. Hahn (Sp)

M269A. Dynamics of Structures. (4)

(Same as Civil Engineering M237A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 169A. Principles of dynamics. Determination of normal modes and frequencies by differential and integral equation solutions. Transient and steady state response. Emphasis on derivation and solution of governing equations using matrix formulation. Letter grading. Mr. Bendiksen (W)

269B. Advanced Dynamics of Structures. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M269A. Analysis of linear and nonlinear response of structures to dynamic loadings. Stresses and deflections in structures. Structural damping and self-induced vibrations. Letter grading. Mr. Bendiksen (Sp, alternate years)

269D. Aeroelastic Effects in Structures. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M269A. Presentation of field of aeroelasticity from unified viewpoint applicable to flight structures, suspension bridges, buildings, and other structures. Derivation of aeroelastic operators and unsteady airloads from governing variational principles. Flow induced instability and response of structural systems. Letter grading. Mr. Bendiksen (F, alternate years)

M270A. Linear Dynamic Systems. (4)

(Same as Chemical Engineering M280A and Electrical Engineering M240A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 171A or Electrical Engineering 141. State-space description of linear time-invariant (LTI) and time-varying (LTV) systems in continuous and discrete time. Linear algebra concepts such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors, singular values, Cayley/Hamilton theorem, Jordan form; solution of state equations; stability, controllability, observability, realizability, and minimality. Stabilization design via state feedback and observers; separation principle. Connections with transfer function techniques. Letter grading. Mr. Gibson (F)

270B. Linear Optimal Control. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M270A or Electrical Engineering M240A. Existence and uniqueness of solutions to linear quadratic (LQ) optimal control problems for continuous-time and discrete-time systems, finite-time and infinite-time problems; Hamiltonian systems and optimal control; algebraic and differential Riccati equations; implications of controllability, stabilizability, observability, and detectability solutions. Letter grading. Mr. Gibson (F)

M270C. Optimal Control. (4)

(Same as Chemical Engineering M280C and Electrical Engineering M240C.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 270B. Applications of variational methods, Pontryagin maximum principle, Hamilton/Jacobi/Bellman equation (dynamic programming) to optimal control of dynamic systems modeled by nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Letter grading. Mr. Speyer (Sp)

271A. Stochastic Processes in Dynamical Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 171A, 174. Probability space, random variables, stochastic processes, Brownian motion, Markov processes, stochastic integrals and differential equations, power spatial density, and Kolmogorov equations. Letter grading. Mr. Speyer (F)

271B. Stochastic Estimation. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 271A. Linear and nonlinear estimation theory, orthogonal projection lemma, Bayesian filtering theory, conditional mean and risk estimators. Letter grading. Mr. Speyer (W)

271C. Stochastic Optimal Control. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 271B. Stochastic dynamic programming, certainty equivalence principle, separation theorem, information statistics; linear-quadratic-Gaussian problem, linear-exponential-Gaussian problem. Relationship between stochastic control and robust control. Letter grading. Mr. Speyer (Sp)

271D. Seminar: Special Topics in Dynamic Systems Control. (4)

Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Seminar on current research topics in dynamic systems modeling, control, and applications. Topics selected from process control, differential games, nonlinear estimation, adaptive filtering, industrial and aerospace applications, etc. Letter grading. Mr. Speyer

M272A. Nonlinear Dynamic Systems. (4)

(Same as Chemical Engineering M282A and Electrical Engineering M242A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M270A or Chemical Engineering M280A or Electrical Engineering M240A. State-space techniques for studying solutions of time-invariant and time-varying nonlinear dynamic systems with emphasis on stability. Lyapunov theory (including converse theorems), invariance, center manifold theorem, input-to-state stability and small-gain theorem. Letter grading. Mr. Shamma (Sp)

273A. Robust Control System Analysis and Design. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 171A, M270A. Graduate-level introduction to analysis and design of multivariable control systems. Multivariable loop-shaping, performance requirements, model uncertainty representations, and robustness covered in detail from frequency domain perspective. Structured singular value and its application to controller synthesis. Letter grading. Mr. M'Closkey (Sp)

275A. System Identification. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Methods for identification of dynamical systems from input/output data, with emphasis on identification of discrete-time (digital) models of sampled-data systems. Coverage of conversion to continuous-time models. Models identified include transfer functions and state-space models. Discussion of applications in mechanical and aerospace engineering, including identification of flexible structures, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices, and acoustic ducts. Letter grading. Mr. Gibson (Sp)

M276. Dynamic Programming. (4)

(Same as Electrical Engineering M237.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Recommended requisite: Electrical Engineering 232A or 236A or 236B. Introduction to mathematical analysis of sequential decision processes. Finite horizon model in both deterministic and stochastic cases. Finite-state infinite horizon model. Methods of solution. Examples from inventory theory, finance, optimal control and estimation, Markov decision processes, combinatorial optimization, communications. Letter grading. Mr. Shamma (Sp)

CM280A. Introduction to Micromachining and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS). (4)

(Formerly numbered M280.) (Same as Biomedical Engineering CM250A and Electrical Engineering CM250A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20L, Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL. Corequisite: course CM280L. Introduction to micromachining technologies and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Methods of micromachining and how these methods can be used to produce variety of MEMS, including microstructures, microsensors, and microactuators. Students design microfabrication processes capable of achieving desired MEMS device. Concurrently scheduled with course CM180. Letter grading. Mr. C-J. Kim (W)

CM280L. Introduction to Micromachining and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Laboratory. (2)

(Formerly numbered 280L.) (Same as Biomedical Engineering CM250L and Electrical Engineering CM250L.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours; outside study, one hour. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20L, Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL. Corequisite: course CM280A. Hands-on introduction to micromachining technologies and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) laboratory. Methods of micromachining and how these methods can be used to produce variety of MEMS, including microstructures, microsensors, and microactuators. Students go through process of fabricating MEMS device. Concurrently scheduled with course CM180L. Letter grading. Mr. C-J. Kim (W)

281. Microsciences. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 131A, 150A. Basic science issues in micro domain. Topics include micro fluid science, microscale heat transfer, mechanical behavior of microstructures, as well as dynamics and control of micro devices. Letter grading.
Mr. Ho, Mr. C-J. Kim (F)

M282. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Device Physics and Design. (4)

(Same as Biomedical Engineering M250B and Electrical Engineering M250B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M280. Introduction to MEMS design. Design methods, design rules, sensing and actuation mechanisms, microsensors, and microactuators. Designing MEMS to be produced with both foundry and nonfoundry processes. Computer-aided design for MEMS. Design project required. Letter grading. Mr. C-J. Kim (Sp)

283. Experimental Mechanics for Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS). (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Methods, techniques, and philosophies being used to characterize microelectromechanical systems for engineering applications. Material characterization, mechanical/material properties, mechanical characterization. Topics include fundamentals of crystallography, anisotropic material properties, and mechanical behavior (e.g., strength/fracture/fatigue) as they relate to microscale. Considerable emphasis on emerging experimental approaches to assess design-relevant mechanical properties. Letter grading. Mr. Carman (Sp, alternate years)

284. Sensors, Actuators, and Signal Processing. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Principles and performance of micro transducers. Applications of using unique properties of micro transducers for distributed and real-time control of engineering problems. Associated signal processing requirements for these applications. Letter grading. Mr. Ho (W, alternate years)

285. Interfacial Phenomena. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 103, 105A, 105D, 182A. Introduction to fundamental physical phenomena occurring at interfaces and application of their knowledge to engineering problems. Fundamental concepts of interfacial phenomena, including surface tension, surfactants, interfacial thermodynamics, interfacial forces, interfacial hydrodynamics, and dynamics of triple line. Presentation of various applications, including wetting, change of phase (boiling and condensation), forms and emulsions, microelectromechanical systems, and biological systems. Letter grading. Mr. Pilon (F)

286. Molecular Dynamics Simulation. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Preparation: computer programming experience. Requisites: courses 182A, 182C. Introduction to basic concepts and methodologies of molecular dynamics simulation. Advantages and disadvantages of this approach for various situations. Emphasis on systems of engineering interest, especially microscale fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and solid mechanics problems. Letter grading. Mr. Kavehpour (W)

M287. Nanoscience and Technology. (4)

(Same as Electrical Engineering M257.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Introduction to fundamentals of nanoscale science and technology. Basic physical principles, quantum mechanics, chemical bonding and nanostructures, top-down and bottom-up (self-assembly) nanofabrication; nanocharacterization; nanomaterials, nanoelectronics, and nanobiodetection technology. Introduction to new knowledge and techniques in nano areas to understand scientific principles behind nanotechnology and inspire students to create new ideas in multidisciplinary nano areas. Letter grading. Mr. Chen (W)

C287L. Nanoscale Fabrication, Characterization, and Biodetection Laboratory. (2 to 4)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Multidisciplinary course that introduces laboratory techniques of nanoscale fabrication, characterization, and biodetection. Basic physical, chemical, and biological principles related to these techniques, top-down and bottom-up (self-assembly) nanofabrication, nanocharacterization (AEM, SEM, etc.), and optical and electrochemical biosensors. Students encouraged to create their own ideas in self-designed experiments. Concurrently scheduled with course C187L. Letter grading. Mr. Chen (Sp)

288. Laser Microfabrication. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: Materials Science 14, Physics 17. Science and engineering of laser microscopic fabrication of advanced materials, including semiconductors, metals, and insulators. Topics include fundamentals in laser interactions with advanced materials, transport issues (therma, mass, chemical, carrier, etc.) in laser microfabrication, state-of-the-art optics and instrumentation for laser microfabrication, applications such as rapid prototyping, surface modifications (physical/chemical), micromachines for three-dimensional MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) and data storage, up-to-date research activities. Student term projects. Letter grading. Mr. Zhang (Sp)

293. Quality Engineering in Design and Manufacturing. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 174. Quality engineering concepts and approaches. Taguchi methods of robust technology development and off-line control. Quality loss function, signal-to-noise ratio, and orthogonal arrays. Parametric design of products and production processes. Tolerance design. Online quality control systems. Decision making in quality engineering. Letter grading. Mr. Yang (W)

294. Computational Geometry for Design and Manufacturing. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 184. Computational geometry for design and manufacturing, with special emphasis on curve and surface theory, geometric modeling of curves and surfaces, B-splines and NURBS, composite curves and surfaces, computing methods for surface design and manufacture, and current research topics in computational geometry for CAD/CAM systems. Letter grading. Mr. Yang (W)

295A. Computer-Aided Manufacturing. (4)

(Formerly numbered 295.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Preparation: course 163A or 185. Requisite: course 94. Concepts, methods, and elements of computer-aided manufacturing. Planning and control of manufacturing systems. Group technology and computer-aided process planning. Design and modeling of flexible manufacturing systems. Computer-aided manufacturing. Letter grading. Mr. Yang (F)

295B. Internet-Based Collaborative Design. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 94, 184. Exploration of advanced state-of-the-art concepts in Internet-based collaborative design, including software environments to connect designers over Internet, networked variable media graphics environments such as high-end virtual reality systems, mid-range graphics, and low-end mobile device-based systems, and multifunctional design collaboration and software tools to support it. Letter grading. Mr. Gadh (W)

295C. Radio Frequency Identification Systems: Analysis, Design, and Applications. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for graduate engineering students. Examination of emerging discipline of radio frequency identification (RFID), including basics of RFID, how RFID systems function, design and analysis of RFID systems, and applications to fields such as supply chain, manufacturing, retail, and homeland security. Letter grading. Mr. Gadh (F)

296A. Damage and Failure of Materials in Mechanical Design. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: course 156A, Materials Science 143A. Role of failure prevention in mechanical design and case studies. Mechanics and physics of material imperfections: voids, dislocations, cracks, and inclusions. Statistical and deterministic design methods. Plastic, fatigue, and creep damage. Letter grading. Mr. Ghoniem (Sp, alternate years)

296B. Thermochemical Processing of Materials. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 131A, 183. Thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, principles of material processing: phase equilibria and transitions, transport mechanisms of heat and mass, moving interfaces and heat sources, natural convection, nucleation and growth of microstructure, etc. Applications with chemical vapor deposition, infiltration, etc. Letter grading. Mr. Ghoniem, Ms. Lavine (F)

297. Composites Manufacturing. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: course 166C, Materials Science 151. Matrix materials, fibers, fiber preforms, elements of processing, autoclave/compression molding, filament winding, pultrusion, resin transfer molding, automation, material removal and assembly, metal and ceramic matrix composites, quality assurance. Letter grading. Mr. Hahn (Sp)

298. Seminar: Engineering. (2 to 4)

Seminar, to be arranged. Limited to graduate mechanical and aerospace engineering students. Seminars may be organized in advanced technical fields. If appropriate, field trips may be arranged. May be repeated with topic change. Letter grading.

M299A. Seminar: Systems, Dynamics, and Control Topics. (2)

(Same as Chemical Engineering M297 and Electrical Engineering M248S.) Seminar, two hours; outside study, six hours. Limited to graduate engineering students. Presentations of research topics by leading academic researchers from fields of systems, dynamics, and control. Students who work in these fields present their papers and results. S/U grading. Mr. Shamma (F,W,Sp)

375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum. (1 to 4)

Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at the University. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading. Ms. Lavine (F,W,Sp)

596. Directed Individual or Tutorial Studies. (2 to 8)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate mechanical and aerospace engineering students. Petition forms to request enrollment may be obtained from assistant dean, Graduate Studies. Supervised investigation of advanced technical problems. S/U grading.

597A. Preparation for M.S. Comprehensive Examination. (2 to 12)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate mechanical and aerospace engineering students. Reading and preparation for M.S. comprehensive examination. S/U grading.

597B. Preparation for Ph.D. Preliminary Examinations. (2 to 16)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate mechanical and aerospace engineering students. S/U grading.

597C. Preparation for Ph.D. Oral Qualifying Examination. (2 to 16)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate mechanical and aerospace engineering students. Preparation for oral qualifying examination, including preliminary research on dissertation. S/U grading.

598. Research for and Preparation of M.S. Thesis. (2 to 12)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate mechanical and aerospace engineering students. Supervised independent research for M.S. candidates, including thesis prospectus. S/U grading.

599. Research for and Preparation of Ph.D. Dissertation. (2 to 16)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate mechanical and aerospace engineering students. Usually taken after students have been advanced to candidacy. S/U grading.