Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

UCLA
5531 Boelter Hall
Box 951592
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1592

 

(310) 825-2046
fax: (310) 206-4107
http://www.chemeng.ucla.edu

Vasilios I. Manousiouthakis, Ph.D., Chair
James C. Liao, Ph.D., Vice Chair

Professors

Jane P. Chang, Ph.D. (William Frederick Seyer Term Professor of Materials Electrochemistry)

Panagiotis D. Christofides, Ph.D.

Yoram Cohen, Ph.D.

James F. Davis, Ph.D., Associate Vice Chancellor

Sheldon K. Friedlander, Ph.D. (Ralph M. Parsons Professor of Chemical Engineering)

Robert F. Hicks, Ph.D.

Louis J. Ignarro, Ph.D. (Nobel laureate)

James C. Liao, Ph.D.

Yunfeng Lu, Ph.D.

Vasilios I. Manousiouthakis, Ph.D.

Harold G. Monbouquette, Ph.D.

Selim M. Senkan, Ph.D.

Professors Emeriti

Eldon L. Knuth, Ph.D.

Ken Nobe, Ph.D.

William D. Van Vorst, Ph.D.

A.R. Frank Wazzan, Ph.D., Dean Emeritus

Assistant Professors

Gerassimos Orkoulas, Ph.D.

Tatiana Segura, Ph.D.

Yi Tang, Ph.D.

Scope and Objectives

The Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering conducts undergraduate and graduate programs of teaching and research that focus on the areas of cellular/molecular bioengineering, systems engineering, and semiconductor manufacturing and span the general themes of energy/environment and nanoengineering. Aside from the fundamentals of chemical engineering (applied mathematics, thermodynamics, transport phenomena, kinetics, reactor engineering and separations), particular emphasis is on genomics and proteomics, biochips, metabolic engineering, biosynthesis, bio-nano-technology, biomaterials, air pollution, water production and treatment, combustion, environmental multimedia modeling, pollution prevention, aerosol processes, cryogenics, combinatorial catalysis, molecular simulation, process modeling/simulation/control/optimization/integration/synthesis, membrane science, semiconductor processing, chemical vapor deposition, plasma processing and simulation, electrochemistry corrosion, polymer engineering, and hydrogen production.

Students are trained in the fundamental principles of these fields while learning a sensitivity to society's needs--a crucial combination in addressing the question of how industry can grow and innovate in an era of economic, environmental, and energy constraints.

The undergraduate curriculum leads to a B.S. in Chemical Engineering, is accredited by ABET and AIChE, and includes the standard curriculum, as well as bioengineering, biomedical engineering, environmental, and semiconductor manufacturing options. The department also offers graduate courses and research leading to M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. Both graduate and undergraduate programs closely relate teaching and research to important industrial problems.

Undergraduate Mission and Program Objectives

The mission of the undergraduate program is to educate future leaders in chemical and biomolecular engineering who effectively combine their broad knowledge of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology with their engineering analysis and design skills for the creative solution of problems in chemical and biological technology and for the synthesis of innovative (bio)chemical processes and products. This goal is achieved by producing alumni who demonstrate (1) the ability to draw readily on a rigorous education in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology in addition to the fundamentals of chemical engineering to creatively solve problems in chemical and biological technology, (2) an understanding and sensitivity to social, ethical, environmental, and economical issues involving chemical engineering practice and an understanding of the role of chemical engineers in sustainable development, (3) successful participation in multidisciplinary teams assembled to tackle complex multifaceted problems that may require implementation of both experimental and computational approaches and a broad array of analytical tools, and (4) the ability to build on their undergraduate-level scientific knowledge and engineering skills through graduate study in the sciences and engineering and through success as professionals in diverse fields, including business, medicine, and environmental protection, as well as chemical and biomolecular engineering.

Undergraduate Study

Chemical Engineering B.S.

The ABET-accredited chemical engineering curriculum provides a high quality, professionally oriented education in modern chemical engineering. The bioengineering, biomedical engineering, environmental, and semiconductor manufacturing options exist as subsets of courses within the accredited curriculum. Balance is sought between science and engineering practice.

Chemical Engineering Option

Preparation for the Major

Required: Chemical Engineering 10; Chemistry and Biochemistry 20A, 20B, 20L, 30A, 30AL, 30B; Computer Science 31; Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B, 33A, 33B; Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL.

The Major

Required: Chemical Engineering 100, 101A, 101B, 101C, 102A, 102B, 103, 104A, 104B, 106, 107, 108A, 108B, 109, Chemistry and Biochemistry 113A, 153A; three breadth courses (12 units) selected from an approved list available in the Office of Academic and Student Affairs; and two elective courses (8 units) from Chemical Engineering 110, C111, C112, 113, C114, C115, C116, C118, C119, C125, C140.

For information on University and general education requirements, see Requirements for B.S. Degrees on page 21 or http://www.registrar.ucla.edu/ge/GE-ENGRNew06-07.pdf.

Biomedical Option

Preparation for the Major

Required: Chemical Engineering 10; Chemistry and Biochemistry 20A, 20B, 20L, 30A, 30AL, 30B; Computer Science 31; Life Sciences 2, 3; Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B, 33A, 33B; Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL.

The Major

Required: Chemical Engineering 100, 101A, 101B, 101C, 102A, 102B, 103, 104A, 104B, 106, 107, 108A, 108B, 109, Chemistry and Biochemistry 113A, 153A; three breadth courses (12 units) selected from an approved list available in the Office of Academic and Student Affairs; and one biomedical elective course (4 units) from Chemical Engineering C115, C125, CM145 (another chemical engineering elective may be substituted for one of these with approval of the faculty adviser).

For information on University and general education requirements, see Requirements for B.S. Degrees on page 21 or http://www.registrar.ucla.edu/ge/GE-ENGRNew06-07.pdf.

Biomolecular Option

Preparation for the Major

Required: Chemical Engineering 10; Chemistry and Biochemistry 20A, 20B, 20L, 30A, 30AL, 30B; Computer Science 31; Life Sciences 2, 3; Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B, 33A, 33B; Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL.

The Major

Required: Chemical Engineering 100, 101A, 101B, 101C, 102A, 102B, 103, 104A, 104D, 104DL, 107, 108A, 108B, 109, C115, C125, Chemistry and Biochemistry 113A, 153A; three breadth courses (12 units) selected from an approved list available in the Office of Academic and Student Affairs; and one biomolecular elective course (4 units -- Chemical Engineering CM145 is recommended; another chemical engineering elective may be substituted with approval of the faculty adviser).

For information on University and general education requirements, see Requirements for B.S. Degrees on page 21 or http://www.registrar.ucla.edu/ge/GE-ENGRNew06-07.pdf.

Environmental Option

Preparation for the Major

Required: Chemical Engineering 10; Chemistry and Biochemistry 20A, 20B, 20L, 30A, 30AL, 30B; Computer Science 31; Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B, 33A, 33B; Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL.

The Major

Required: Chemical Engineering 100, 101A, 101B, 101C, 102A, 102B, 103, 104A, 104B, 106, 107, 108A, 108B, 109, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences 104, Chemistry and Biochemistry 113A, 153A; three breadth courses (12 units) selected from an approved list available in the Office of Academic and Student Affairs; and two elective courses (8 units) from Chemical Engineering 113, C118, C119, C140 (another chemical engineering elective may be substituted with approval of the faculty adviser).

For information on University and general education requirements, see Requirements for B.S. Degrees on page 21 or http://www.registrar.ucla.edu/ge/GE-ENGRNew06-07.pdf.

Semiconductor Manufacturing Option

Preparation for the Major

Required: Chemical Engineering 10; Chemistry and Biochemistry 20A, 20B, 20L, 30A, 30AL, 30B; Computer Science 31; Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B, 33A, 33B; Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL.

The Major

Required: Chemical Engineering 100, 101A, 101B, 101C, 102A, 102B, 103, 104A, 104C, 104CL, 106, 107, 108A, 108B, 109, C116, Chemistry and Biochemistry 113A, 153A; three breadth courses (12 units) selected from an approved list available in the Office of Academic and Student Affairs; and one elective course (4 units) from Materials Science and Engineering 104, 120, 121, 122, or 150 plus one elective course (4 units) from Electrical Engineering 2, 100, 121B, 123A, or 123B.

For information on University and general education requirements, see Requirements for B.S. Degrees on page 21 or http://www.registrar.ucla.edu/ge/GE-ENGRNew06-07.pdf.

Graduate Study

For information on graduate admission, see Graduate Programs, page 24.

For additional information regarding the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering, refer to the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department brochure.

The following introductory information is based on the 2006-07 edition of Program Requirements for UCLA Graduate Degrees. Complete annual editions of Program Requirements are available from the "Publications" link at http://www.gdnet.ucla.edu. Students are subject to the degree requirements as published in Program Requirements for the year in which they matriculate.

The Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering offers Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in Chemical Engineering.

Chemical Engineering M.S.

Areas of Study

Consult the department.

For the semiconductor manufacturing field, the program requires that students have advanced knowledge, assessed in a comprehensive examination, of processing semiconductor devices on the nanoscale.

Course Requirements

The requirements for an M.S. degree are a thesis, nine courses (36 units), and a 3.0 grade-point average in the graduate courses. Chemical Engineering 200, 210, and 220 are required for all M.S. degree candidates. Two courses must be taken from offerings in the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, while two Chemical Engineering 598 courses involving work on the thesis may also be selected. The remaining two courses may be taken from those offered by the department or any other field in life sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, or engineering. At least 24 units must be in letter-graded 200-level courses.

All M.S. degree candidates must enroll in the seminar, Chemical Engineering 299, during each quarter in residence.

A program of study that encompasses these requirements must be submitted to the departmental Student Affairs Office for approval before the end of the student's second quarter in residence.

Undergraduate Courses. No lower division courses may be applied toward graduate degrees. In addition, the following upper division courses are not applicable toward graduate degrees: Chemical Engineering 102A, 199; Civil and Environmental Engineering 106A, 108, 199; Computer Science M152A, M152B, M171L, 199; Electrical Engineering 100, 101, 102, 103, 110L, M116D, M116L, M171L, 199; Materials Science and Engineering 110, 120, 130, 131, 131L, 132, 140, 141L, 150, 160, 161L, 199; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 102, 103, 105A, 105D, 199.

Semiconductor Manufacturing

The requirements for the M.S. degree in the field of semiconductor manufacturing are 10 courses (44 units) and a minimum 3.0 grade-point average overall and in the graduate courses. Students are required to take Chemical Engineering 104C/104CL, C216, 270, 270R, Electrical Engineering 123A, Materials Science and Engineering 121. In addition, two departmental elective courses and two electrical engineering or materials science and engineering electives must be selected, with a minimum of two at the 200 level. A total of at least five graduate (200-level) courses is required. Approved elective courses include Chemical Engineering C214, C218, C219, 223, 234, C240, Electrical Engineering 124, 221B, 223, 224, Materials Science and Engineering 221, 223, 245C.

Courses taken by students who are not enrolled in the semiconductor manufacturing field may not be applied toward the 10-course requirement for the degree. A program of study encompassing the course requirements and/or substitutions must be submitted to the graduate adviser for approval before the end of the first quarter in residence.

Field Experience. Students may take Chemical Engineering 270R in the field, working at an industrial semiconductor fabrication facility. This option must meet all course requirements and must be approved by the graduate adviser and the industrial sponsor of the research.

Comprehensive Examination Plan

The comprehensive examination plan is not available for fields other than semiconductor manufacturing.

For the semiconductor manufacturing field, when all coursework is completed, students should enroll in Chemical Engineering 597A to prepare for the comprehensive examination, which tests their knowledge of the engineering principles of semiconductor manufacturing. In case of failure, the examination may be repeated once with the consent of the graduate adviser.

Thesis Plan

Consult the graduate adviser. The thesis plan is not available for the semiconductor manufacturing field.

Chemical Engineering Ph.D.

Major Fields or Subdisciplines

Consult the department.

Course Requirements

All Ph.D. students must take six courses (24 units), including Chemical Engineering 200, 210, and 220. Two additional courses must be taken from those offered by the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department. The third course can be selected from offerings in life sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, or engineering. All of these units must be in letter-graded 200-level courses. Students are encouraged to take more courses in their field of specialization. The minor field courses should be selected in consultation with the research adviser and approved by the graduate adviser. A 3.33 grade-point average in graduate courses is required. A program of study to fulfill the course requirements must be submitted for approval to the departmental Student Affairs Office no later than one quarter after successful completion of the preliminary oral examination.

All Ph.D. students are required to enroll in the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department's graduate seminar during each quarter in residence.

For information on completing the Engineer degree, see Engineering Schoolwide Programs.

Written and Oral Qualifying Examinations

All Ph.D. students must take a preliminary oral examination that tests their understanding of chemical engineering fundamentals in the areas of thermodynamics, transport phenomena, chemical kinetics, and reactor design. The examination is held at the beginning of Winter Quarter. Students are asked to solve the examination problems in writing and then present them orally to a faculty committee. Students whose first degree is not in chemical engineering may petition to postpone the examination to the following year. Any student failing the Ph.D. preliminary examination may petition to reenter the Ph.D. program after successfully completing the master's thesis. If the petition is granted, the student may be approved to take the preliminary examination concurrently with the master's thesis defense.

After successfully completing the required courses and the preliminary oral examination, students must pass the written and oral qualifying examinations. The examinations focus on the dissertation research and are conducted by a doctoral committee consisting of at least four faculty members nominated by the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, in accordance with University regulations.

The written qualifying examination consists of a dissertation research proposal that provides a clear description of the problem considered, a literature review of the current state of the art, and a detailed explanation of the approach to be followed to solve the problem. Students first present their ideas for the dissertation research at a precandidacy seminar administered by departmental faculty members of the doctoral committee. The seminar is held during the early part of the Winter Quarter of the second year in residence. Following the seminar, students submit the dissertation research proposal to the doctoral committee. The written examination is due in the seventh week of the Winter Quarter.

The University Oral Qualifying Examination consists of an oral defense of the dissertation research proposal and is administered by the doctoral committee. The oral examination is held within two weeks of submitting the written examination.

Note: Doctoral Committees. A doctoral committee consists of a minimum of four members. Three members, including the chair, are "inside" members and must hold appointments at UCLA in the student's major department in HSSEAS. The "outside" member must be a UCLA faculty member outside the student's major department.

Facilities

Biomolecular Engineering Laboratories

The Biomolecular Engineering laboratories are equipped for cutting-edge genetic, molecular, and cellular bioengineering teaching and research. Facilities and equipment include (1) DNA microarray printing and scanning facility, (2) fluorescence microscopy, (3) real-time PCR thermocycler, (4) UV-visible and fluorescence spectrophotometers, (5) HPLC and LC-mass spectrometer, (6) aerobic and anaerobic bioreactors from bench top to 100-liter pilot scale, (7) protein purification facility, (8) potentiostat.galvanostat and impedance analyzer for electroenzymology, (9) membrane extruder and multiangle laser light scattering for production and characterization of biological and semi-synthetic colloids such as micelles and vesicles, and (10) phosphoimager for biochemical assays involving radiolabeled compounds.

Microbial cells are genetically and metabolically engineered to produce novel compounds that are used as drugs, specialty chemicals, and food additives. Novel gene-metabolic circuits are designed and constructed in microbial cells to perform complex and non-native cellular behavior. These designer cells are cultured in bioreactors, and intracellular states are monitored using DNA microarrays and real-time RT-PCR. Such investigations are coupled with genomic and proteomic efforts, and mathematical modeling, to achieve system-wide understanding of the cell.

Protein engineering is being used to generate completely novel compounds that have important pharmaceutical value. Bacteria are being custom-designed to synthesize important therapeutic compounds that have anticancer, cholesterol-lowering, and/or antibiotic activities. Biosensors are being micromachined for detecting neurotransmitters in vivo. New biosensing schemes also are being invented for the detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals in the environment and for the high-throughput screening of drug candidates. Naturally occurring protein nanocapsules are being redesigned at the genetic level for applications in drug delivery and materials synthesis. Finally, the enzymology of extremely thermophilic microbes is being explored for applications in specialty chemical synthesis.

Chemical Kinetics, Catalysis, Reaction Engineering, and Combustion Laboratory

The Chemical Kinetics, Catalysis, Reaction Engineering, and Combustion Laboratory is equipped with advanced research tools for experimental and computational studies in chemical kinetics, catalytic materials, and combustion, including quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) systems to sample reactive systems with electron impact and photoionization capabilities; several fully computerized gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) systems for gas analysis; fully computerized array channel microreactors for catalyst discovery and optimization; several flat premixed and diffusion flame burners and flow reactors to study combustion and other fast reactions; a laser photoionization (LP) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer for the ultrasensitive, real-time detection of trace pollutants in the gas phase; a gravimetric microbalance to study heterogeneous reactions; and several state-of-the-art supermicro workstations for numerical investigations in fluid mechanics, detailed chemical kinetic modeling, and computational quantum chemistry.

Electrochemical Engineering and Catalysis Laboratories

With instrumentation such as rotating ring-disk electrodes, electrochemical packed-bed flow reactors, gas chromatographs, potentiostats, and function generators, the Electrochemical Engineering and Catalysis Laboratories are used to study metal, alloy, and semiconductor corrosion processes, electro-deposition and electroless deposition of metals, alloys, and semiconductors for GMR and MEMS applications, electrochemical energy conversion (fuel cells) and storage (batteries), and bioelectrochemical processes and biomedical systems.

The electroorganic synthesis facility is for the development of electrochemical processes to transform biomass-derived organic compounds into useful chemicals, fuels, and pharmaceuticals. The catalysis facility is equipped to support various types of catalysis projects, including catalytic hydrocarbon oxidation, selective catalytic reduction of NOx, and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis.

Electronic Materials Processing Laboratory

The Electronic Materials Processing Laboratory focuses on the synthesis and patterning of mutlifunctional complex oxide films with tailored electronic, chemical, thermal, mechanical, and biological properties. Experimental and theoretical studies are combined to understand the process chemistry and surface kinetics in atomic layer deposition, plasma etching and deposition processes, and gas-phase surface functionalization processes. Novel devices including advanced microelectronics, optoelectronics, and chemical sensors are realized at nano-dimensions as the technologies become more enabling based on these fundamental studies.

The laboratory is equipped with a state-of-the-art advanced rapid thermal processing facility with in-situ vapor phase processing and atomic layer deposition capabilities; advanced plasma processing tools including thin film deposition and etching; and diagnostics including optical emissions spectroscopy, Langmuir probe, and quadruple mass spectrometry; a surface analytical facility including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high energy electron diffraction, spectroscopic ellipsometry, photoluminescence, and infrared spectroscopy; and a complete set of processing tools available for microelectronics and MEMS fabrication in the Nanoelectronic Research Facility. With the combined material characterization and electronic device fabrication, the reaction kinetics including composition and morphology, and the electrical property of these materials can be realized for applications in the next generation electronic devices and chemical or biological MEMS.

Materials and Plasma Chemistry Laboratory

The Materials and Plasma Chemistry Laboratory is equipped with state-of-the-art instruments for studying the molecular processes that occur during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and plasma processing. CVD is a key technology for synthesizing advanced electronic and optical devices, including solid-state lasers, infrared, visible, and ultraviolet detectors and emitters, solar cells, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and high-electron mobility transistors. The laboratory houses a commercial CVD reactor for the synthesis of III-V compound semiconductors. This tool is interfaced to an ultrahigh vacuum system equipped with scanning tunneling microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction; infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This apparatus characterizes the atomic structure of compound semiconductor heterojunction interfaces and determines the kinetics of CVD reactions on these surfaces.

The atmospheric plasma laboratory is equipped with multiple plasma sources and state-of-the-art diagnostic tools. The plasmas generate, at low temperature, beams of atoms and radicals well-suited for surface treatment, cleaning, etching, deposition, and sterilization. Applications are in the biomedical, electronics, and aerospace fields. The laboratory is unique in that it characterizes the reactive species generated in atmospheric plasmas and their chemical interactions with surfaces.

Nanoparticle Technology and Air Quality Engineering Laboratory

Modern particle technology focuses on particles in the nanometer (nm) size range with applications to air pollution control and commercial production of fine particles. Particles with diameters between 1 and 100 nm are of interest both as individual particles and in the form of aggregate structures. The Nanoparticle Technology and Air Quality Engineering Laboratory is equipped with instrumentation for online measurement of aerosols, including opti-cal particle counters, electrical aerosol analyzers, and condensation particle counters. A novel low-pressure impactor designed in the laboratory is used to fractionate particles for morphological analysis in size ranges down to 50 nm (0.05 micron). Also available is a high-volumetric flowrate impactor suitable for collecting particulate matter for chemical analysis. Several types of specially designed aerosol generators are also available, including a laser ablation chamber, tube furnaces, and a specially designed aerosol microreactor.

Concern with nanoscale phenomena requires the use of advanced systems for particle observation and manipulation. Students have direct access to modern facilities for transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Located near the laboratory, the Electron Microscopy facilities staff provide instruction and assistance in the use of these instruments. Advanced electron microscopy has recently been used in the laboratory to make the first systematic studies of atmospheric nanoparticle chain aggregates. Such aggregate structures have been linked to public health effects and to the absorption of solar radiation. A novel nanostructure manipulation device, designed and built in the laboratory, makes it possible to probe the behavior of nanoparticle chain aggregates of a type produced commercially for use in nanocomposite materials; these aggregates are also released by sources of pollution such as diesel engines and incinerators.

Polymer and Separations Research Laboratory

The Polymer and Separations Research Laboratory is equipped for research on membranes, water desalination, adsorption, chemical sensors, polymerization kinetics, surface engineering with polymers and the behavior of polymeric fluids in confined geometries. Instrumentation includes a high resolution multiprobe Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and a quartz crystal microbalance system for membrane and sensor development work. An atmospheric plasma surface structuring system is available for nano-structuring ceramic and polymeric surfaces for a variety of applications that include membrane performance enhancement and chemical sensor arrays. Analytical equipment for polymer characterization includes several high-pressure liquid chromatographs for size exclusion chromatography equipped with different detectors, including refractive index, UV photodiode array, conductivity, and a photodiode array laser light scattering detector. The laboratory has a research-grade FTIR with a TGA interface, a thermogravimetric analysis system, and a dual column gas chromatograph. Equipment for viscometric analysis includes high- and low-pressure capillary viscometer, narrow gap cylindrical couette viscometer, cone-and-plate viscometer, intrinsic viscosity viscometer system and associated equipment. Flow equipment is also available for studying fluid flow through channels of different geometries (e.g., capillary, slit, porous media). The evaluation of polymeric and novel ceramic-polymer membranes, developed in the laboratory, is made possible with reverse osmosis, pervaporation, and cross-flow ultrafiltration systems equipped with online detectors. Studies of high recovery membrane desalination are carried out in a membrane concentrator/crystallizer system. Resin sorption and regeneration studies can be carried out with a fully automated system.

Process Systems Engineering Laboratory

The Process Systems Engineering Laboratory is equipped with state-of-the-art computer hardware and software used for the simulation, design, optimization, control, and integration of chemical processes. Several personal computers and workstations, as well as an 8-node dual-processor cluster, are available for teaching and research. SEASnet and campuswide computational facilities are also available to the laboratory's members. Software for simulation and optimization of general systems includes MINOS, GAMS, MATLAB, CPLEX, and LINDO. Software for simulation of chemical engineering systems includes HYSYS for process simulation and CACHE-FUJITSU for molecular calculations. UCLA-developed software for heat/power integration and reactor network attainable region construction are also available.

Faculty Areas of Thesis Guidance

Professors

Jane P. Chang, Ph.D. (MIT, 1998)

Materials processing, gas-phase and surface reaction, plasma enhanced chemistries, atomic layer deposition, chemical microelectromechanical systems, and computational surface chemistry

Panagiotis D. Christofides, Ph.D. (Minnesota, 1996)

Process modeling, dynamics and control, computational and applied mathematics

Yoram Cohen, Ph.D. (Delaware, 1981)

Separation processes, graft polymerization, surface nanostructuring, macromolecular dynamics, pollutant transport and exposure assessment

James F. Davis, Ph.D. (Northwestern, 1981)

Intelligent systems in process, control
operations and design, decision support, management of abnormal situations, data interpretation, knowledge databases, pattern recognition

Sheldon K. Friedlander, Ph.D. (Illinois, 1954)

Aerosol dynamics, nanoparticle technology, diffusion and interfacial transfer, air pollution control, atmospheric aerosols

Robert F. Hicks, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1984)

Chemical vapor deposition and atmospheric plasma processing

Louis J. Ignarro, Ph.D. (Minnesota, 1966)

Regulation and modulation of NO production

James C. Liao, Ph.D. (Wisconsin, Madison, 1987)

Biochemical engineering, metabolic reaction engineering, reaction path analysis and control

Yunfeng Lu, Ph.D. (University of New Mexico, 1998)

Semiconductor manufacturing and nanotechnology

Vasilios I. Manousiouthakis, Ph.D. (Rensselaer, 1986)

Process systems engineering: modeling, simulation, design, optimization, and control

Harold G. Monbouquette, Ph.D. (North Carolina State, 1987)

Biochemical engineering, biosensors, biotechnology of extreme thermophiles, nanotechnology

Selim M. Senkan, Ph.D. (MIT, 1977)

Reaction engineering, combinatorial catalysis, combustion, laser photoionization, real-time detection, quantum chemistry

Professors Emeriti

Eldon L. Knuth, Ph.D. (Cal Tech, 1953)

Molecular dynamics, thermodynamics, combustion, applications to air pollution control and combustion efficiency

Ken Nobe, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1956)

Electrochemistry, corrosion, electrochemical kinetics, electrochemical energy conversion, electrodeposition of metals and alloys, electrochemical treatment of toxic wastes, bioelectrochemistry

William D. Van Vorst, Ph.D. (UCLA, 1953)

Chemical engineering: thermodynamics, energy conversion, alternative energy systems, hydrogen- and alcohol-fueled engines

A.R. Frank Wazzan, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1963)

Fast reactors, nuclear fuel element modeling, stability and transition of boundary layers, heat transfer

Assistant Professors

Gerassimos Orkoulas, Ph.D. (Cornell, 1998)

Molecular simulation, critical phenomena in ionic fluids, thermodynamics of complex fluids

Tatiana Segura, Ph.D. (Northwestern, 2004)

Gene therapy, tissue engineering, substrate-mediated non-viral DNA delivery

Yi Tang, Ph.D. (Cal Tech, 2002)

Biosynthesis of proteins/polypeptides with unnatural amino acids, synthesis of novel antibiotics/antitumor products

Lower Division Courses

2. Technology and the Environment. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Natural and anthropogenic flows of materials at global and regional scales. Case studies of natural cycles include global warming (CO 2 cycles), stratospheric ozone depletion (chlorine and ozone cycles), and global nitrogen cycles. Flow of materials in industrial economies compared and contrasted with natural flows; presentation of life-cycle methods for evaluating environmental impact of processes and products. P/NP or letter grading. Mr. Manousiouthakis (Sp)

10. Introduction to Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. (1)

Lecture, one hour. General introduction to field of chemical and biomolecular engineering. Description of how chemical and biomolecular engineering analysis and design skills are applied for creative solution of current technological problems in production of microelectronic devices, design of chemical plants for minimum environmental impact, application of nanotechnology to chemical sensing, and genetic-level design of recombinant microbes for chemical synthesis. Letter grading. Mr. Monbouquette (F)

19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars. (1)

Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

99. Student Research Program. (1 to 2)

Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

Upper Division Courses

100. Fundamentals of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20B, 20L, Mathematics 32B (may be taken concurrently), Physics 1A. Introduction to analysis and design of industrial chemical processes. Material and energy balances. Introduction to programming in MATLAB. Letter grading. Mr. Monbouquette (F)

101A. Transport Phenomena I. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course 102A, Mathematics 33A, 33B. Corequisite: course 109. Introduction to analysis of fluid flow in chemical, biological, materials, and molecular processes. Fundamentals of momentum transport, Newton law of viscosity, mass and momentum conservation in laminar flow, Navier/Stokes equations, and engineering analysis of flow systems. Letter grading. Mr. Cohen, Mr. Friedlander (F)

101B. Transport Phenomena II: Heat Transfer. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 101A. Fundamentals of classical and statistical thermodynamics. Phase equilibria in single and multicomponent systems. Thermodynamics of ideal and nonideal solutions. Chemical reaction equilibria. Statistical ensembles and partition functions. Thermodynamic functions of ideal gases. Intermolecular interactions and liquid state. Molecular simulation techniques. Letter grading. Ms. Chang, Mr. Hicks (W)

101C. Mass Transfer. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 100, 101B, 102B. Introduction to analysis of mass transfer in systems of interest to chemical engineering practice. Fundamentals of mass species transport, Fick law of diffusion, diffusion in chemically reacting flows, interphase mass transfer, multicomponent systems. Letter grading. Mr. Cohen, Mr. Hicks (Sp)

102A. Thermodynamics I. (4)

(Formerly numbered M105A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Mathematics 33A, 33B. Introduction to thermodynamics of chemical and biological processes. Work, energy, heat, and first law of thermodynamics. Second law, extremum principles, entropy, and free energy. Ideal and real gases, property evaluation. Thermodynamics of flow systems. Applications of first and second laws in biological processes and living organisms. Letter grading. Mr. Orkoulas (F)

102B. Thermodynamics II. (4)

(Formerly numbered 102.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course 102A, Mathematics 33A, 33B. Fundamentals of classical and statistical thermodynamics in chemical and biological sciences. Phase equilibria in single and multicomponent systems. Thermodynamics of ideal and nonideal solutions. Chemical reaction equilibria. Statistical ensembles and partition functions. Statistical thermodynamics of ideal gases. Intermolecular interactions and liquid state. Thermodynamics of polymers and biological macromolecules. Letter grading. Mr. Orkoulas (W)

103. Separation Processes. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 100, 101B, 102B. Application of principles of heat, mass, and momentum transport to design and operation of separation processes such as distillation, gas absorption, filtration, and reverse osmosis. Letter grading. Ms. Chang, Mr. Hicks (Sp)

104A. Chemical Engineering Laboratory I. (6)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours; outside study, four hours; other, four hours. Requisites: courses 100, 101B, 102B. Measurements of temperature, pressure, flow rate, viscosity, and fluid composition in chemical processes. Methods of data acquisition, equipment selection and fabrication, and laboratory safety. Development of written and oral communication skills. Letter grading. Mr. Hicks (W,Sp)

104B. Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Laboratory II. (6)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours; outside study, four hours; other, four hours. Requisites: courses 101C, 103, 104A. Course consists of four experiments in chemical engineering unit operations, each of two weeks duration. Students present their results both written and orally. Written report includes sections on theory, experimental procedures, scaleup and process design, and error analysis. Letter grading. Mr. Senkan (F,W)

104C. Semiconductor Processing. (3)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: courses 101C, 104A, Electrical Engineering 2, Materials Science 120. Corequisite: course 104CL. Basic engineering principles of semiconductor unit operations, including fabrication and characterization of semiconductor devices. Investigation of processing steps used to make CMOS devices, including wafer cleaning, oxidation, diffusion, lithography, chemical vapor deposition, plasma etching, metallization, and statistical design of experiments and error analysis. Presentation of student results in both written and oral form. Letter grading. Ms. Chang, Mr. Hicks (Sp)

104CL. Semiconductor Processing Laboratory. (3)

Laboratory, four hours. Requisites: courses 101C, 104A, Electrical Engineering 2, Materials Science 120. Corequisite: course 104C. Series of experiments that emphasize basic engineering principles of semiconductor unit operations, including fabrication and characterization of semiconductor devices. Investigation of processing steps used to make CMOS devices, including wafer cleaning, oxidation, diffusion, lithography, chemical vapor deposition, plasma etching, and metallization. Hands-on device testing includes transistors, diodes, and capacitors. Letter grading. Ms. Chang, Mr. Hicks (Sp)

104D. Molecular Biotechnology Lecture: From Gene to Product. (2)

Lecture, two hours. Requisites: courses 101C, 103, 104A. Corequisite: course 104DL. Integration of molecular and engineering techniques in modern biotechnology. Cloning of protein-coding gene into plasmid, transformation of construct into E. coli, production of gene product in bioreactor, downstream processing of bioreactor broth to purify recombinant protein, and characterization of purified protein. Letter grading. Mr. Liao (W)

104DL. Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory: From Gene to Product. (4)

Laboratory, eight hours. Requisites: courses 101C, 103, 104A. Corequisite: course 104D. Integration of molecular and engineering techniques in modern biotechnology. Cloning of protein-coding gene into plasmid, transformation of construct into E. coli, production of gene product in bioreactor, downstream processing of bioreactor broth to purify recombinant protein, and characterization of purified protein. Letter grading. Mr. Liao (W)

106. Chemical Reaction Engineering. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 100, 101C, 102B. Fundamentals of chemical kinetics and catalysis. Introduction to analysis and design of homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical reactors. Letter grading. Mr. Senkan (F)

107. Process Dynamics and Control. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 101C, 103, 106. Principles of dynamics modeling and start-up behavior of chemical engineering processes. Chemical process control elements. Design and applications of chemical process computer control. Letter grading. Mr. Christofides, Mr. Manousiouthakis (W)

108A. Process Economics and Analysis. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 103, 104B, 106. Integration of chemical engineering fundamentals such as transport phenomena, thermodynamics, separation operations, and reaction engineering and simple economic principles for purpose of designing chemical processes and evaluating alternatives. Letter grading. Mr. Manousiouthakis (W)

108B. Chemical Process Computer-Aided Design and Analysis. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 103, 106, 108A, and either Civil Engineering 15 or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 20. Introduction to application of some mathematical and computing methods to chemical engineering design problems; use of simulation programs as automated method of performing steady state material and energy balance calculations. Letter grading. Mr. Manousiouthakis (Sp)

109. Numerical and Mathematical Methods in Chemical and Biological Engineering. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Preparation: basic knowledge of MATLAB programming. Numerical methods for computation of solution of systems or linear and nonlinear algebraic equations, ordinary differential equations, and partial equations. Chemical and biomolecular engineering examples used throughout to illustrate application of these methods. Use of MATLAB as platform (programming environment) to write programs based on numerical methods to solve various problems arising in chemical engineering. Letter grading. Mr. Christofides (F)

110. Intermediate Engineering Thermodynamics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 102B. Principles and engineering applications of statistical and phenomenological thermodynamics. Determination of partition function in terms of simple molecular models and spectroscopic data; nonideal gases; phase transitions and adsorption; nonequilibrium thermodynamics and coupled transport processes. Letter grading. Mr. Nobe (Sp)

C111. Cryogenics and Low-Temperature Processes. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 102A, 102B (or Materials Science 130). Fundamentals of cryogenics and cryoengineering science pertaining to industrial low-temperature processes. Basic approaches to analysis of cryofluids and envelopes needed for operation of cryogenic systems; low-temperature behavior of matter, optimization of cryosystems and other special conditions. Concurrently scheduled with course C211. Letter grading. Mr. Manousiouthakis (F)

C112. Polymer Processes. (4)

(Formerly numbered 112.) Lecture, four hours. Requisites: course 101A, Chemistry 30A. Formation of polymers, criteria for selecting a reaction scheme, polymerization techniques, polymer characterization. Mechanical properties. Rheology of macromolecules, polymer process engineering. Diffusion in polymeric systems. Polymers in biomedical applications and in microelectronics. Concurrently scheduled with course C212. Letter grading. Mr. Cohen (Sp)

113. Air Pollution Engineering. (4)

Lecture, four hours; preparation, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: courses 101C, 102B. Integrated approach to air pollution, including concentrations of atmospheric pollutants, air pollution standards, air pollution sources and control technology, and relationship of air quality to emission sources. Links air pollution to multimedia environmental assessment. Letter grading. Mr. Friedlander (F)

C114. Electrochemical Processes and Corrosion. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 102A, 102B (or Materials Science 130). Fundamentals of electrochemistry and engineering applications to industrial electrochemical processes and metallic corrosion. Primary emphasis on fundamental approach to analysis of electrochemical and corrosion processes. Specific topics include corrosion of metals and semiconductors, electrochemical metal and semiconductor surface finishing, passivity, electrodeposition, electroless deposition, batteries and fuel cells, electrosynthesis and bioelectrochemical processes. May be concurrently scheduled with course C214. Letter grading. Mr. Nobe (F)

C115. Biochemical Reaction Engineering. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 101C and 106, or Chemistry 156. Use of previously learned concepts of biophysical chemistry, thermodynamics, transport phenomena, and reaction kinetics to develop tools needed for technical design and economic analysis of biological reactors. May be concurrently scheduled with course CM215. Letter grading. Mr. Liao, Mr. Monbouquette (Sp)

C116. Surface and Interface Engineering. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: Chemistry 113A. Introduction to surfaces and interfaces of engineering materials, particularly catalytic surface and thin films for solid-state electronic devices. Topics include classification of crystals and surfaces, analysis of structure and composition of crystals and their surfaces and interfaces. Examination of engineering applications, including catalytic surfaces, interfaces in microelectronics, and solid-state laser. May be concurrently scheduled with course C216. Letter grading. Ms. Chang, Mr. Hicks (F)

C118. Multimedia Environmental Assessment. (4)

Lecture, four hours; preparation, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: courses 101C, 102B. Pollutant sources, estimation of source releases, waste minimization, transport and fate of chemical pollutants in environment, intermedia transfers of pollutants, multimedia modeling of chemical partitioning in environment, exposure assessment and fundamentals of risk assessment, risk reduction strategies. Concurrently scheduled with course C218. Letter grading. Mr. Cohen (W)

C119. Pollution Prevention for Chemical Processes. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 108A. Systematic methods for design of environment-friendly processes. Development of the methods at molecular, unit-operation, and network levels. Synthesis of mass exchange, heat exchange, and reactor networks. Concurrently scheduled with course C219. Letter grading. Mr. Manousiouthakis (Sp)

C121. Membrane Science Technology. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 101A, 101C, 103. Fundamentals of membrane science and technology, with emphasis on separations at micro, nano, and molecular/angstrom scale with membranes. Relationship between structure/morphology of dense and porous membranes and their separation characteristics. Use of nanotechnology for design of selective membranes and models of membrane transport (flux and selectivity). Examples provided from various fields/applications, including biotechnology, microelectronics, chemical processes, sensors, and biomedical devices. Concurrently scheduled with course C221. Letter grading. Mr. Cohen (W)

C125. Bioseparations and Bioprocess Engineering. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 101C and 103, or Chemistry 156. Separation strategies, unit operations, and economic factors used to design processes for isolating and purifying materials like whole cells, enzymes, food additives, or pharmaceuticals that are products of biological reactors. Concurrently scheduled with course CM225. Letter grading. Mr. Liao, Mr. Monbouquette (W)

C135. Advanced Process Control. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 107. Introduction to advanced process control. Topics include (1) Lyapunov stability for autonomous nonlinear systems including converse theorems, (2) input to state stability, interconnected systems, and small gain theorems, (3) design of nonlinear and robust controllers for various classes of nonlinear systems, (4) model predictive control of linear and nonlinear systems, (5) advanced methods for tuning of classical controllers, and (6) introduction to control of distributed parameter systems. Concurrently scheduled with course C235. Letter grading. Mr. Christofides (Sp)

C140. Fundamentals of Aerosol Technology. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 101C. Technology of particle/gas systems with applications to gas cleaning, commercial production of fine particles, and catalysis. Particle transport and deposition, optical properties, experimental methods, dynamics and control of particle formation processes. Concurrently scheduled with course C240. Letter grading. Mr. Friedlander (F or W)

CM145. Molecular Biotechnology for Engineers. (4)

(Same as Biomedical Engineering CM145.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Selected topics in molecular biology that form foundation of biotechnology and biomedical industry today. Topics include recombinant DNA technology, molecular research tools, manipulation of gene expression, directed mutagenesis and protein engineering, DNA-based diagnostics and DNA microarrays, antibody and protein-based diagnostics, genomics and bioinformatics, isolation of human genes, gene therapy, and tissue engineering. Concurrently scheduled with course CM245. Letter grading. Mr. Liao (F)

188. Special Courses in Chemical Engineering. (4)

Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Special topics in chemical engineering for undergraduate students that are taught on experimental or temporary basis, such as those taught by resident and visiting faculty members. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.

194. Research Group Seminars: Chemical Engineering. (4)

Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for undergraduate students who are part of research group. Discussion of research methods and current literature in field. Letter grading.

199. Directed Research in Chemical Engineering. (2 to 8)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation of selected topic under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be repeated for credit with school approval. Individual contract required; enrollment petitions available in Office of Academic and Student Affairs. Letter grading.
(F,W,Sp)

Graduate Courses

200. Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 102B. Phenomenological and statistical thermodynamics of chemical and physical systems with engineering applications. Presentation of role of atomic and molecular spectra and intermolecular forces in interpretation of thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids, solids, and plasmas. Letter grading. Mr. Nobe (F)

201. Methods of Molecular Simulation. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 200 or Chemistry C223A or Physics 215A. Modern simulation techniques for classical molecular systems. Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics in various ensembles. Applications to liquids, solids, and polymers. Letter grading.

210. Advanced Chemical Reaction Engineering. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 101C, 106. Principles of chemical reactor analysis and design. Particular emphasis on simultaneous effects of chemical reaction and mass transfer on noncatalytic and catalytic reactions in fixed and fluidized beds. Letter grading. Mr. Senkan (W)

C211. Cryogenics and Low-Temperature Processes. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 102A, 102B (or Materials Science 130). Fundamentals of cryogenics and cryoengineering science pertaining to industrial low-temperature processes. Basic approaches to analysis of cryofluids and envelopes needed for operation of cryogenic systems; low-temperature behavior of matter, optimization of cryosystems and other special conditions. Concurrently scheduled with course C111. Letter grading. (F)

C212. Polymer Processes. (4)

Lecture, four hours. Requisites: course 101A, Chemistry 30A. Formation of polymers, criteria for selecting a reaction scheme, polymerization techniques, polymer characterization. Mechanical properties. Rheology of macromolecules, polymer process engineering. Diffusion in polymeric systems. Polymers in biomedical applications and in microelectronics. Concurrently scheduled with course C112. Letter grading.

Mr. Cohen (Sp)

C214. Electrochemical Processes and Corrosion. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 102A, 102B (or Materials Science 130). Fundamentals of electrochemistry and engineering applications to industrial electrochemical processes and metallic corrosion. Primary emphasis on fundamental approach to analysis of electrochemical and corrosion processes. Specific topics include corrosion of metals and semiconductors, electrochemical metal and semiconductor surface finishing, passivity, electrodeposition, electroless deposition, batteries and fuel cells, electrosynthesis and bioelectrochemical processes. May be concurrently scheduled with course C114. Letter grading. Mr. Nobe (F)

CM215. Biochemical Reaction Engineering. (4)

(Same as Biomedical Engineering M215.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 101C and 106, or Chemistry 156. Use of previously learned concepts of biophysical chemistry, thermodynamics, transport phenomena, and reaction kinetics to develop tools needed for technical design and economic analysis of biological reactors. May be concurrently scheduled with course C115. Letter grading. Mr. Liao, Mr. Monbouquette (W)

C216. Surface and Interface Engineering. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: Chemistry 113A. Introduction to surfaces and interfaces of engineering materials, particularly catalytic surface and thin films for solid-state electronic devices. Topics include classification of crystals and surfaces, analysis of structure and composition of crystals and their surfaces and interfaces. Examination of engineering applications, including catalytic surfaces, interfaces in microelectronics, and solid-state laser. May be concurrently scheduled with course C116. Letter grading. Ms. Chang, Mr. Hicks (F)

217. Electrochemical Engineering. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course C114. Transport phenomena in electrochemical systems; relationships between molecular transport, convection, and electrode kinetics, along with applications to industrial electrochemistry, fuel cell design, and modern battery technology. Letter grading. Mr. Nobe (F)

C218. Multimedia Environmental Assessment. (4)

Lecture, four hours; preparation, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: courses 101C, 102B. Pollutant sources, estimation of source releases, waste minimization, transport and fate of chemical pollutants in environment, intermedia transfers of pollutants, multimedia modeling of chemical partitioning in environment, exposure assessment and fundamentals of risk assessment, risk reduction strategies. Concurrently scheduled with course C118. Letter grading. Mr. Cohen (W)

C219. Pollution Prevention for Chemical Processes. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 108A. Systematic methods for design of environment-friendly processes. Development of the methods at molecular, unit-operation, and network levels. Synthesis of mass exchange, heat exchange, and reactor networks. Concurrently scheduled with course C119. Letter grading. Mr. Manousiouthakis (Sp)

220. Advanced Mass Transfer. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 101C. Advanced treatment of mass transfer, with applications to industrial separation processes, gas cleaning, pulmonary bioengineering, controlled release systems, and reactor design; molecular and constitutive theories of diffusion, interfacial transport, membrane transport, convective mass transfer, concentration boundary layers, turbulent transport. Letter grading. Mr. Cohen, Mr. Friedlander (F)

C221. Membrane Science Technology. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 101A, 101C, 103. Fundamentals of membrane science and technology, with emphasis on separations at micro, nano, and molecular/angstrom scale with membranes. Relationship between structure/morphology of dense and porous membranes and their separation characteristics. Use of nanotechnology for design of selective membranes and models of membrane transport (flux and selectivity). Examples provided from various fields/applications, including biotechnology, microelectronics, chemical processes, sensors, and biomedical devices. Concurrently scheduled with course C121. Letter grading. Mr. Cohen (W)

222A. Stochastic Modeling and Simulation of Chemical Processes. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Introduction, definition, rationale of stochastic processes. Distribution, moments, correlation. Mean square calculus. Wiener process, white noise, Poisson process. Generalized functions. Linear systems with stochastic inputs, ergodicity. Application to chemical process modeling and simulation. Markov chains and processes. Ito integrals, stochastic difference, and differential equations. S/U or letter grading. Mr. Manousiouthakis (F)

222B. Stochastic Optimization and Control. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 222A. Introduction to linear and nonlinear systems theory and estimation theory. Prediction, Kalman filter, smoothing of discrete and continuous systems. Stochastic control, systems with multiplicative noise. Applications to control of chemical processes. Stochastic optimization, stochastic linear and dynamic programming. S/U or letter grading. Mr. Manousiouthakis (W)

223. Design for Environment. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Limited to graduate chemical engineering, materials science and engineering, or Master of Engineering program students. Design of products for meeting environmental objectives; life-cycle inventories; life-cycle impact assessment; design for energy efficiency; design for waste minimization, computer-aided design tools, materials selection methods. Letter grading.

CM225. Bioseparations and Bioprocess Engineering. (4)

(Same as Biomedical Engineering M225.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 101C and 103, or Chemistry 156. Separation strategies, unit operations, and economic factors used to design processes for isolating and purifying materials like whole cells, enzymes, food additives, or pharmaceuticals that are products of biological reactors. Concurrently scheduled with course C125. Letter grading. Mr. Liao, Mr. Monbouquette (Sp)

230. Reaction Kinetics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 106, 200. Macroscopic descriptions: reaction rates, relaxation times, thermodynamic correlations of reaction rate constants. Molecular descriptions: kinetic theory of gases, models of elementary processes. Applications: absorption and dispersion measurements, unimolecular reactions, photochemical reactions, hydrocarbon pyrolysis and oxidation, explosions, polymerization. Letter grading. Mr. Senkan (Sp)

231. Molecular Dynamics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 106 or 110. Analysis and design of molecular-beam systems. Molecular-beam sampling of reactive mixtures in combustion chambers or gas jets. Molecular-beam studies of gas-surface interactions, including energy accommodations and heterogeneous reactions. Applications to air pollution control and to catalysis. Letter grading.

232. Combustion Processes. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 106, 200, or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 132A. Fundamentals: change equations for multicomponent reactive mixtures, rate laws. Applications: combustion, including burning of (1) premixed gases or (2) condensed fuels. Detonation. Sound absorption and dispersion. Letter grading. Mr. Senkan (Sp)

234. Plasma Chemistry and Engineering. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for graduate chemistry or engineering students. Application of chemistry, physics, and engineering principles to design and operation of plasma and ion-beam reactors used in etching, deposition, oxidation, and cleaning of materials. Examination of atomic, molecular, and ionic phenomena involved in plasma and ion-beam processing of semiconductors, etc. Letter grading. Ms. Chang, Mr. Hicks (Sp)

C235. Advanced Process Control. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 107. Introduction to advanced process control. Topics include (1) Lyapunov stability for autonomous nonlinear systems including converse theorems, (2) input to state stability, interconnected systems, and small gain theorems, (3) design of nonlinear and robust controllers for various classes of nonlinear systems, (4) model predictive control of linear and nonlinear systems, (5) advanced methods for tuning of classical controllers, and (6) introduction to control of distributed parameter systems. Concurrently scheduled with course C135. Letter grading. Mr. Christofides (Sp)

236. Chemical Vapor Deposition. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 210, C216. Chemical vapor deposition is widely used to deposit thin films that comprise microelectronic devices. Topics include reactor design, transport phenomena, gas and surface chemical kinetics, structure and composition of deposited films, and relationship between process conditions and film properties. Letter grading. Mr. Hicks (Sp)

C240. Fundamentals of Aerosol Technology. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 101C. Technology of particle/gas systems with applications to gas cleaning, commercial production of fine particles, and catalysis. Particle transport and deposition, optical properties, experimental methods, dynamics and control of particle formation processes. Concurrently scheduled with course C140. Letter grading. Mr. Friedlander (F)

CM245. Molecular Biotechnology for Engineers. (4)

(Same as Biomedical Engineering CM245.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Selected topics in molecular biology that form foundation of biotechnology and biomedical industry today. Topics include recombinant DNA technology, molecular research tools, manipulation of gene expression, directed mutagenesis and protein engineering, DNA-based diagnostics and DNA microarrays, antibody and protein-based diagnostics, genomics and bioinformatics, isolation of human genes, gene therapy, and tissue engineering. Concurrently scheduled with course CM145. Letter grading. Mr. Liao (F)

246. Systems Biology: Intracellular Network Identification and Analysis. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: course CM245, Life Sciences 1, 2, 3, 4, Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 33B. Systems approach to intracellular network identification and analysis. Transcriptional regulatory networks, protein networks, and metabolic networks. Data from genome sequencing, large-scale expression analysis, and other high-throughput techniques provide bases for systems identification and analysis. Discussion of gene-metabolic network synthesis. Letter grading. Mr. Liao (W)

250. Computer-Aided Chemical Process Design. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 108B. Application of optimization methods in chemical process design; computer aids in process engineering; process modeling; systematic flowsheet invention; process synthesis; optimal design and operation of large-scale chemical processing systems. Letter grading. Mr. Manousiouthakis (F)

260. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 102A. Principles of non-Newtonian fluid mechanics. Stress constitutive equations. Rheology of polymeric liquids and dispersed systems. Applications in viscometry, polymer processing, biorheology, oil recovery, and drag reduction. Letter grading. Mr. Cohen (Sp)

270. Principles of Reaction and Transport Phenomena. (4)

Lecture, four hours; laboratory, eight hours. Fundamentals in transport phenomena, chemical reaction kinetics, and thermodynamics at molecular level. Topics include Boltzmann equation, microscopic chemical kinetics, transition state theory, and statistical analysis. Examination of engineering applications related to state-of-the-art research areas in chemical engineering. Letter grading. Ms. Chang (W)

270R. Advanced Research in Semiconductor Manufacturing. (6)

Laboratory, nine hours; outside study, nine hours. Limited to graduate chemical engineering students in M.S. semiconductor manufacturing option. Supervised research in processing semiconductor materials and devices. Letter grading.

M280A. Linear Dynamic Systems. (4)

(Same as Electrical Engineering M240A and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M270A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: Electrical Engineering 141 or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 171A. State-space description of linear time-invariant (LTI) and time-varying (LTV) systems in continuous and discrete time. Linear algebra concepts such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors, singular values, Cayley/Hamilton theorem, Jordan form; solution of state equations; stability, controllability, observability, realizability, and minimality. Stabilization design via state feedback and observers; separation principle. Connections with transfer function techniques. Letter grading.

M280C. Optimal Control. (4)

(Same as Electrical Engineering M240C and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M270C.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: Electrical Engineering 240B or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 270B. Applications of variational methods, Pontryagin maximum principle, Hamilton/Jacobi/Bellman equation (dynamic programming) to optimal control of dynamic systems modeled by nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Letter grading.

M282A. Nonlinear Dynamic Systems. (4)

(Same as Electrical Engineering M242A and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M272A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M280A or Electrical Engineering M240A or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M270A. State-space techniques for studying solutions of time-invariant and time-varying nonlinear dynamic systems with emphasis on stability. Lyapunov theory (including converse theorems), invariance, center manifold theorem, input-to-state stability and small-gain theorem. Letter grading.

283C. Analysis and Control of Infinite Dimensional Systems. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses M280A, M282A. Designed for graduate students. Introduction to advanced dynamical analysis and controller synthesis methods for nonlinear infinite dimensional systems. Topics include (1) linear operator and stability theory (basic results on Banach and Hilbert spaces, semigroup theory, convergence theory in function spaces), (2) nonlinear model reduction (linear and nonlinear Galerkin method, proper orthogonal decomposition), (3) nonlinear and robust control of nonlinear hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs), (4) applications to transport-reaction processes. Letter grading. Mr. Christofides

284A. Optimization in Vector Spaces. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: Electrical Engineering 236A, 236B. Review of functional analysis concepts. Convexity, convergence, continuity. Minimum distance problems for Hilbert and Banach spaces. Lagrange multiplier theorem in Banach spaces. Nonlinear duality theory. Letter grading. Mr. Manousiouthakis

290. Special Topics. (2 to 4)

Seminar, four hours. Requisites for each offering announced in advance by department. Advanced and current study of one or more aspects of chemical engineering, such as chemical process dynamics and control, fuel cells and batteries, membrane transport, advanced chemical engineering analysis, polymers, optimization in chemical process design. May be repeated for credit with topic change. Letter grading.

M297. Seminar: Systems, Dynamics, and Control Topics. (2)

(Same as Electrical Engineering M248S and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M299A.) Seminar, two hours; outside study, six hours. Limited to graduate engineering students. Presentations of research topics by leading academic researchers from fields of systems, dynamics, and control. Students who work in these fields present their papers and results. S/U grading.

298A-298Z. Research Seminars. (2 to 4 each)

Seminar, to be arranged. Requisites for each offering announced in advance by department. Lectures, discussions, student presentations, and projects in areas of current interest. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading. (F,W,Sp)

299. Departmental Seminar. (2)

Seminar, two hours. Limited to graduate chemical engineering students. Seminars by leading academic and industrial chemical engineers on development or application of recent technological advances in the discipline. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading. (F,W,Sp)

375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum. (1 to 4)

Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at the University. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading. (F,W,Sp)

495A. Teaching Assistant Training Seminar. (2)

Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours; one-day intensive training at beginning of Fall Quarter. Limited to graduate chemical engineering students. Required of all new teaching assistants. Special seminar on communicating chemical engineering principles, concepts, and methods; teaching assistant preparation, organization, and presentation of material, including use of grading, advising, and rapport with students. S/U grading.

495B. Teaching with Technology for Teaching Assistants. (2)

Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Limited to graduate chemical engineering students. Designed for teaching assistants interested in learning more about effective use of technology and ways to incorporate that technology into their classrooms for benefit of student learning. S/U grading.

596. Directed Individual or Tutorial Studies. (2 to 8)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate chemical engineering students. Petition forms to request enrollment may be obtained from assistant dean, Graduate Studies. Supervised investigation of advanced technical problems. S/U grading.

597A. Preparation for M.S. Comprehensive Examination. (2 to 12)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate chemical engineering students in M.S. semiconductor manufacturing option. Reading and preparation for M.S. comprehensive examination. S/U grading.

597B. Preparation for Ph.D. Preliminary Examinations. (2 to 16)

Seminar, to be arranged. Limited to graduate chemical engineering students. S/U grading.

597C. Preparation for Ph.D. Oral Qualifying Examination. (2 to 16)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate chemical engineering students. Preparation for oral qualifying examination, including preliminary research on dissertation. S/U grading.

598. Research for and Preparation of M.S. Thesis. (2 to 12)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate chemical engineering students. Supervised independent research for M.S. candidates, including thesis prospectus. S/U grading.

599. Research for and Preparation of Ph.D. Dissertation. (2 to 16)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate chemical engineering students. Usually taken after students have been advanced to candidacy. S/U grading.