Biomedical Engineering

Interdepartmental Program

UCLA
7523 Boelter Hall
Box 951600
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1600

 

(310) 794-5945
fax: (310) 794-5956
e-mail: bme@ea.ucla.edu
http://www.bme.ucla.edu

Timothy J. Deming, Ph.D., Chair

Faculty Advisory Committee

Timothy J. Deming, Ph.D. (Bioengineering)

Bruce S. Dunn, Ph.D. (Materials Science and Engineering)

Chih-Ming Ho, Ph.D. (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

Hooshang Kangarloo, M.D. (Pediatrics, Radiological Sciences)

John D. Mackenzie, Ph.D. (Materials Science and Engineering)

Ichiro Nishimura, D.D.S., D. M.Sc., D. M.D. (Dentistry)

James N. Weiss, M.D. (Cardiology)

Professors

Denise Aberle, M.D. (Bioengineering, Radiological Sciences)

Abeer A.H. Alwan, Ph.D. (Electrical Engineering)

Rajive Bagrodia, Ph.D. (Computer Science)

Francisco Bezanilla, Ph.D. (Physiology)

Arnold J. Berk, M.D. (Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics)

Sally Blower, Ph.D. (Biomathematics)

Angelo Caputo, Ph.D. (Dentistry)

Gregory P. Carman, Ph.D. (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

Tony F.C. Chan, Ph.D. (Mathematics)

Peng-Shen Chen, Ph.D., in Residence (Medicine)

Yong Chen, Ph.D. (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

Marie Françoise Chesselet, M.D., Ph.D. (Neurology)

Mark Cohen, Ph.D. (Neurology, Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Radiological Sciences)

Jean B. deKernion, M.D. (Urology)

Joseph L. Demer, M.D., Ph.D. (Neurology, Ophthalmology)

Linda L. Demer, M.D., Ph.D. (Cardiology, Physiology)

Timothy J. Deming, Ph.D. (Bioengineering)

Vijay K. Dhir, Ph.D. (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

Joseph J. DiStefano III, Ph.D. (Computer Science, Medicine)

Bruce H. Dobkin, M.D. (Neurology)

Gary Duckweiler, M.D., Ph.D. (Radiological Sciences)

Bruce S. Dunn, Ph.D. (Materials Science and Engineering)

V. Reggie Edgerton, Ph.D. (Physiological Science)

Jack L. Feldman, Ph.D. (Neurobiology, Physiological Science)

Harold R. Fetterman, Ph.D. (Electrical Engineering)

Gerald A. M. Finerman, M.D. (Orthopaedic Surgery)

C. Fred Fox, Ph.D. (Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics)

C.R. Gallistel, Ph.D. (Psychology)

Alan Garfinkel, Ph.D. (Cardiology, Physiological Science)

Robin L. Garrell, Ph.D. (Chemistry and Biochemistry)

Bruce R. Gerratt, Ph.D. (Head and Neck Surgery)

Warren S. Grundfest, M.D. FACS (Bioengineering, Electrical Engineering, Surgery)

Robert P. Gunsalus, Ph.D. (Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics)

Vijay Gupta, Ph.D. (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

Chih-Ming Ho, Ph.D. (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ben Rich Lockheed Martin Professor of Aeronautics, Center for Micro Systems Director)

Edward J. Hoffman, Ph.D. (Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Radiological Sciences)

Henry S.C. Huang, D.Sc. (Biomathematics, Molecular and Medical Pharmacology)

Stephen E. Jacobsen, Ph.D. (Electrical Engineering)

J-Woody Ju, Ph.D . (Civil and Environmental Engineering)

William J. Kaiser, Ph.D. (Electrical Engineering)

Hooshang Kangarloo, M.D. (Pediatrics, Radiological Sciences)

Patricia A. Keating, Ph.D . (Linguistics)

Chang-Jin Kim, Ph.D. (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

J. John Kim, Ph.D. (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

Jess F. Kraus, Ph.D., M.P.H. (Epidemiology)

Jody E. Kreiman, Ph.D., in Residence (Surgery)

Elliot M. Landaw, M.D., Ph.D. (Biomathematics)

Andrew F. Leuchter, M.D. (Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences)

James C. Liao, Ph.D. (Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering)

Jia-Ming Liu, Ph.D. (Electrical Engineering)

Ajit K. Mal, Ph.D. (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

Keith Markolf, Ph.D. (Orthopaedic Surgery)

Edward McCabe, M.D. (Pediatrics)

Harry McKellop, Ph.D., in Residence (Orthopaedic Surgery)

Istvan Mody, Ph.D. (Neurology, Physiology)

Harold G. Monbouquette, Ph.D. (Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering)

Sherie L. Morrison, Ph.D. (Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics)

Peter M. Narins, Ph.D. (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Science)

Stanley Nelson, M.D. (Human Genetics)

Ichiro Nishimura, D.D.S., D. M.Sc., D. M.D. (Dentistry)

D. Stott Parker, Jr., Ph.D. (Computer Science)

Yahya Rahmat-Samii, Ph.D. (Electrical Engineering)

Shlomo Raz, M.D. (Urology)

Vwani Roychowdhury, Ph.D. (Electrical Engineering)

Michael Sofroniew, M.D., Ph.D. (Neurobiology)

James G. Tidball, Ph.D. (Physiological Science)

Arthur Toga, Ph.D. (Neurology)

James N. Weiss, M.D. (Cardiology)

Owen N. Witte, Ph.D. (Microbiology and Molecular Genetics)

Ming C. Wu, Ph.D. (Electrical Engineering)

Jenn-Ming Yang, Ph.D. (Materials Science and Engineering)

Kung Yao, Ph.D. (Electrical Engineering)

Carlo Zaniolo, Ph.D. (Computer Science)

Professors Emeriti

Thelma Estrin, Ph.D. (Computer Science)

Allen Klinger, Ph.D. (Computer Science)

John D. Mackenzie, Ph.D. (Materials Science and Engineering)

Jacques J. Vidal, Ph.D. (Computer Science)

Associate Professors

Marvin Bergsneider, M.D. (Neurosurgery)

Susan Y. Bookheimer, Ph.D. (Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences)

Samson Chow, Ph.D. (Molecular and Medical Pharmacology

Jack W. Judy, Ph.D. (Electrical Engineering)

Dario Ringach, Ph.D. (Neurobiology, Psychology)

Shantanu Sinha, Ph.D. (Radiological Sciences)

Desmond Smith, Ph.D. (Molecular and Medical Pharmacology)

Igor Spigelman, Ph.D. (Dentistry)

Albert Thomas, Ph.D., in Residence (Radiological Sciences)

Paul M. Thompson, Ph.D., in Residence (Neurology)

Peter Tontonoz, M.D., Ph.D. (Pathology and Laboratory Medicine)

Jeffrey Wang, M.D. (Orthopaedic Surgery)

Benjamin M. Wu, D.D.S., Ph.D. (Bioengineering, Dentistry, Materials Science and Engineering)

Lily Wu, Ph.D. (Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Urology)

Assistant Professors

Ramin Beygui, M.D. (Surgery)

Arion Chattziioannou, Ph.D. (Molecular and Medical Pharmacology)

Thomas Chou, Ph.D. (Biomathematics)

Ian A. Cook, M.D. (Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences)

Katrina Dipple, M.D., Ph.D. (Human Genetics and Pediatrics)

James Dunn, M.D., Ph.D. (Bioengineering, Pediatric Surgery)

Lee Goodglick, Ph.D. (Pathology and Laboratory Medicine)

Susan Harkema, Ph.D. (Neurology)

George Huang, D.Sc., D.D.S. (Dentistry)

Yongho Ju, Ph.D. (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

Daniel T. Kamei, Ph.D. (Bioengineering)

Andrea M. Kasko, Ph.D. (Bioengineering)

Pirouz Kavehpour, Ph.D. (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

Irwin Kurland, Ph.D. (Medicine/Endocrinology)

Heather Maynard, Ph.D. (Chemistry and Biochemistry)

Sheila Nirenberg, Ph.D. (Neurology)

Matteo Pellegrini, Ph.D. (Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology)

Jacob Schmidt, Ph.D. (Bioengineering)

Felix Schweitzer, Ph.D. (Neurobiology)

Yi Tang, Ph.D. (Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering)

Kang Ting, D. M.D, D. M.Sc. (Dentistry)

Adjunct Professors

Guido Germano, Ph.D. (Radiological Sciences)

John J. Gilman, Ph.D. (Materials Science and Engineering)

Boris Kogan, Ph.D. (Computer Science)

Adjunct Associate Professors

Vivek Dixit, Ph.D. (Medicine)

Marc Hedrick, M.D. (Surgery)

Valeriy I. Nenov, Ph.D. (Neurosurgery)

Usha Sinha, Ph.D. (Radiological Sciences)

Imke Schroeder, Ph.D. (Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics)

Ricky Taira, Ph.D. (Radiological Sciences)

Daniel J. Valentino, Ph.D. (Radiological Sciences)

Adjunct Assistant Professors

Alex Bui, Ph.D. (Radiological Sciences)

Robert Close, Ph.D. (Radiological Sciences)

Robert Goldberg, M.D., Ph.D. (Electrical Engineering)

Scope and Objectives

The Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program trains specially qualified engineers and scientists to work on engineering applications in either medicine or biotechnology.

Graduates apply engineering principles to current needs and contribute to future advances in the fields of medicine and biotechnology. Fostering careers in industry or academia, the program offers students the choice of an M.S. or Ph.D. degree in seven distinct fields of biomedical engineering.

In addition to selected advanced engineering courses, students are required to take specially designed biomedical engineering courses to ensure a minimal knowledge of the appropriate biological sciences. Students receive practical training via an M.S. or Ph.D. research thesis or dissertation in biomedical engineering. Faculty members have principal appointments in departments across campus and well-equipped laboratories for graduate student research projects.

Graduate Study

For information on graduate admission, see Graduate Programs, page 24.

The following introductory information is based on the 2006-07 edition of Program Requirements for UCLA Graduate Degrees. Complete annual editions of Program Requirements are available from the "Publications" link at http://www.gdnet.ucla.edu. Students are subject to the degree requirements as published in Program Requirements for the year in which they matriculate.

The Biomedical Engineering Program offers Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in Biomedical Engineering.

Biomedical Engineering M.S.

Students are expected to complete 42 units, which in most cases include Biomedical Engineering C201, CM202, CM203, and two courses from their area of study. The M.S. degree is offered under both the thesis plan and comprehensive examination plan. Under the thesis plan, 8 units of thesis work may be applied toward the unit requirements for the degree. The comprehensive examination plan consists entirely of coursework (12 courses) and a comprehensive examination on the written portion of the Ph.D. preliminary examination. Eight of the 12 courses must be graduate (200-level) courses, and students must maintain a grade-point average of B or better in both upper division and graduate courses. Three Biomedical Engineering 299 courses (6 units total) are also required.

Biomedical Engineering Ph.D.

The Ph.D. program prepares students for advanced study and research in biomedical engineering. The Ph.D. preliminary examination typically consists of both written and oral parts. To receive a pass on the examination, students must receive a pass on both parts. An oral qualifying/advancement to candidacy examination, coursework for two minor fields of study, and defense of the dissertation are also required. The major field consists of six courses, and each minor field consists of three 4-unit courses, of which two must be graduate (200-level) courses. One minor must be in another field of biomedical engineering. Students must maintain a grade-point average of 3.25 or better in all courses.

Fields of Study

Bioacoustics, Speech, and Hearing

The bioacoustics, speech, and hearing field trains biomedical engineers to apply concepts and methods of engineering and physical and biological sciences to solve problems in speech and hearing. To meet this goal, the program combines a rigorous curriculum in quantitative methods for studying speech and hearing and an exposure to biomedical issues.

Course Requirements

Core Courses (Required). Biomedical Engineering C201, CM202, CM203, M214A, 230.

Electives. Computer Science 276C, Electrical Engineering 214B, Linguistics 204, Neuroscience 274, Physics 114, Physiological Science 173, M290, Psychiatry 298.

Remedial courses are taken as necessary. For students without previous exposure to signal processing, Electrical Engineering 102 and 113 are recommended.

Biocybernetics

Graduate study in biocybernetics is intended for science or engineering students interested in biosystems or biomedical systems, with an emphasis on systems and integration. This encompasses the systems engineering/cybernetics-based integrative properties or behavior of living systems, including their regulation, control, integration, and intercommunication mechanisms, and their associated measurement, visualization, and mathematical and computer modeling.

The program provides directed interdisciplinary biosystem studies to establish a foundation in system and information science, mathematical modeling, measurement and integrative biosystem science, as well as related specialized life sciences domain studies. It fosters careers in research and teaching in engineering, medicine, and/or the biomedical sciences, or research and development in the biomedical or pharmaceutical industry. At the system and integration level, biocybernetics methodology is quite broadly applicable to a large spectrum of biomedical problems.

Typical research areas include basic and clinical problems in biomedical systems, systems biology, all types of biocontrol systems, imaging systems, pharmaceutical systems, biotechnology systems, bioinformatics, genomics, neuroscience, and remote sensing systems for the life sciences.

Faculty research areas include computational biology, computational biochemistry, and metabolism; computational cardiology and neuroendocrinology; biomodeling of diseases, cellular processes, metabolic control systems, and gene networks; modeling in genomics, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics; vision, robotics, speech processing, neuroscience, artificial and real neural network modeling, normative expert systems, wireless remote sensing systems, telemedicine, visualization, and virtual clinical environments.

Course Requirements

Biocybernetics can serve as a minor field for other Ph.D. majors if students complete the following courses with a grade-point average of B+: Biomedical Engineering CM186B, M296A, and one additional graduate-level elective from the additional foundations or electives list.

Core Courses (Required). Biomedical Engineering CM186B, C201, CM202, CM203, and either M296A or Biomathematics 220.

Electives. Biomathematics 206, CM208C, M230, Biomedical Engineering M248, CM286L, M296D, Computer Science 161, 267B, Electrical Engineering 113, 132A, 141, 142, 211A, 211B, M214A, 214B, 232E, CM250A, M250B, 260A, 260B, Mathematics 151A, 151B, 170A, Physics 210B, 231B, Statistics 100A, 100B.

Biomechanics, Biomaterials, and Tissue Engineering

Three subfields--biomechanics, biomaterials, and tissue engineering--encompass this broad field. The properties of bone, muscles, and tissues, the replacement of natural materials with artificial compatible and functional materials such as polymer composites, ceramics, and metals, and the complex interactions between implants and the body are studied.

Course Requirements

Core Courses (Required). Biomedical Engineering C201, CM202, CM203, and two courses from CM240, CM280, C281, 282, C285.

Electives. Chemical Engineering 260, Chemistry and Biochemistry 153A, 153B, 153C, CM153G, CM155, M230B, CM253, CM255, M267A, Civil and Environmental Engineering 235B, Materials Science and Engineering 140, 150, 151, 160, 223, 243A, 244, 245C, 246A, 246D, 250A, 250B, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 150A, 156A, 166C, M256A, M256B, M256C, 262, 297, Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology CM220, Physiological Science M215, 250A, C250B.

Biomedical Instrumentation

The biomedical instrumentation field trains biomedical engineers in the applications and development of instrumentation used in medicine and biotechnology. Examples include the use of lasers in surgery and diagnostics, sensors for detection and monitoring of disease, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices for controlled drug delivery, surgery, or genetics. The principles underlying each instrument and the specific needs in medical applications are emphasized.

Course Requirements

Core Courses (Required). Biomedical Engineering CM150, CM150L, C201, CM202, CM203, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 284.

Electives. Biomedical Engineering CM240, M250B, C270, C271, Electrical Engineering 221A, 221B, 221C, 223, 271, 272, Materials Science and Engineering 200, 201, 243A, 246D, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 157, 263A, 263D, CM280L, 281.

Biomedical Signal and Image Processing and Bioinformatics

The biomedical signal and image processing and bioinformatics field encompasses techniques for the acquisition, processing, classification, and analysis of digital biomedical signals, images, and related information, classification and analysis of biomedical data, and decision support of clinical processes. Sample applications include (1) digital imaging research utilizing modalities such as X-ray imaging, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR), positron emission tomography (PET) and SPECT, optical microscopy, and combinations such as PET/MR, (2) signal processing research on hearing to voice recognition to wireless sensors, and (3) bioinformatics research ranging from image segmentation for content-based retrieval from databases to correlating clinical findings with genomic markers. Graduates of the program integrate advanced digital processing and artificial intelligence technologies with healthcare activities and biomedical research. They are prepared for careers involving innovation in the fields of signal processing, medical imaging, and medical-related informatics in either industry or academia.

Course Requirements

Students selecting biomedical signal and image processing and bioinformatics as a minor field must take three courses, of which at least two must be graduate (200-level) courses.

Core Courses (Required). Biomedical Engineering C201, CM202, CM203, M214A, Electrical Engineering 113, 211A.

Electives. Biomedical Engineering M248, Biomedical Physics 200A, 200B, 219, 222, Biostatistics 420, Computer Science 143, 161, Electrical Engineering 211B, 214B.

Remedial Courses. Electrical Engineering 102, Program in Computing 10A, 10B.

Medical Imaging Informatics

The objective of the medical imaging informatics field is to train students in imaging-based medical informatics. Specifically, the program's aims are to enable (1) students from engineering backgrounds to become familiar with aspects of clinical and medical environments, such that they are able to appropriately apply their skills and knowledge in these domains, (2) students from medical backgrounds to learn sufficient expertise in current information and engineering technologies to address specific problems within clinical environments, (3) all students to be experts within the field of imaging-based medical informatics, becoming experienced in dealing with diverse biomedical data (imaging and text), and (4) all students to learn to work in a multidisciplinary group of researchers and individuals, enabling new developments within the field.

The underlying goal is to foster a community for students and faculty members from multiple disciplines (represented by individuals from the Schools of Engineering, Education and Information Studies, Medicine, and Public Health) to participate in the growing area of medical imaging informatics.

Course Requirements

Core Courses (Required). Biomedical Engineering 220, 221, 222, 223A, 223B, 223C, 224A, 224B, 226, 227, 228.

Electives. Biomedical Physics 210, 214, Biostatistics 213, M234, 276, Computer Science 217B, 240A, 240B, 241A, 241B, 244A, 245A, 246, 262A, 262B, M262C, 263A, 263B, 265A, 268, M276A, 276B, Electrical Engineering M202B, 211A, 211B, M217, Information Studies 228, 246, 272, 277, Linguistics 218, 232, Neuroscience CM272.

Molecular and Cellular Bioengineering

The field of molecular and cellular bioengineering encompasses the engineering of enzymes, cellular metabolism, biological signal transduction, and cell-cell interactions. Research emphasizes the fundamental basis for diagnosis, disease treatment, and redesign of cellular functions at the molecular level. The field interacts closely with the fields of bioinstrumentation (MEMS), tissue engineering, and neuroengineering. Graduates of the program are targeted principally for employment in academia, in government research laboratories, and in the biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and biomedical industries.

Course Requirements

Core Courses (Required). Biomedical Engineering C201, CM202, CM203, and two courses from M215, M225, CM245.

Electives. Biomathematics 220, M270, Biomedical Engineering CM186B, M296A, Chemistry and Biochemistry M230B, CM253, CM255, C259A, C259B, 262, M263, C265, M267A, Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics C233, CM248, 261, Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology CM220, M234.

Neuroengineering

The neuroengineering field is a joint endeavor between the Neuroscience Interdepartmental Ph.D. Program in the Geffen School of Medicine and the Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Graduate Program in HSSEAS, with the active involvement of scientists and technologies from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

The objectives of the neuroengineering field are to enable (1) students with a background in engineering to develop and execute projects that address problems that have a neuroscientific base, including locomotion and pattern generation, central control of movement, and the processing of sensory information; (2) students with a background in biological sciences to develop and execute projects that make use of state-of-the-art technology, including MEMS, signal processing, and photonics. In preparing students to use new technology, the program also introduces them to basic concepts in engineering that are applicable to the study of systems neuroscience, including signal processing, communication, and information theory; and (3) all trainees to develop the capacity for the multidisciplinary teamwork that is necessary for new scientific insights and dramatic technological progress. Courses and research projects are cosponsored by faculty members in both HSSEAS and the Brain Research Institute (BRI).

Requisites for Admission. Students entering the neuroengineering program have graduated with undergraduate degrees in engineering, physics, chemistry, or one of the life sciences (for example, biology, microbiology, immunology, and molecular genetics, molecular, cell, and developmental biology, neuroscience, physiology, or psychology). Engineering students must have taken at least one undergraduate course in biology, one course in chemistry, and a year of physics. Students from nonengineering backgrounds are required to have taken courses in undergraduate calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra, in addition to at least a year of undergraduate courses in each of the following: organic chemistry and biochemistry, physics, and biology. Students lacking one or more requisite courses, if they are otherwise admissible, are provided an opportunity for appropriate coursework or tutorial during the summer before they enter the neuroengineering program.

Written Preliminary Examination. The Ph.D. preliminary examination typically consists of two written parts--one in neuroscience and one in neuroengineering. To receive a pass on the examination, students must receive a pass on both parts. Students who fail the examination may repeat it only once, subject to approval of the faculty examination committee.

Students who are in a field other than neuroengineering and who select neuroengineering as a minor must take Biomedical Engineering M260 and at least one course from two of the following sets of courses: (1) Biomedical Engineering M214A, Electrical Engineering 210A, (2) Biomedical Engineering CM250A, M250B, (3) Biomedical Engineering M263, Neuroscience M202.

Required Courses. Biomedical Engineering M260, M263, Neuroscience M202. For MEMS emphasis, required courses are Biomedical Engineering CM150L, CM250A, M250B (course CM150L is optional if the requisite for course CM250A is met). For signal processing and informatics theory emphasis, required courses are Biomedical Engineering M214A and Electrical Engineering 210A, or two other graduate-level engineering courses approved by the adviser and the neuroengineering field chair. In addition, students are required to take a research seminar and problem-based approaches to neuroengineering seminar.

Recommended Electives. During the first and second years, students take at least three courses selected from a menu of new and existing courses.

Biomedical engineering category: Biomedical Engineering C201.

MEMS category: Biomedical Engineering CM150L, CM250A, M250B, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering CM280L, 284.

Neuroscience category: Neuroscience M201, M263, M273, 274.

Signal processing category: Electrical Engineering 210A, M214A, M217. Remedial courses taken as necessary.

Students without previous exposure to MEMS should take Biomedical Engineering CM150L; those without previous exposure to neuroscience should take Physiological Science 111A; those without previous exposure to signal processing should take Electrical Engineering 102 and113. Both courses are offered every quarter.

Seminars (First-Year). Two seminars in problem-based approaches to neuroengineering are required. All first-year students take a new graduate seminar series in Winter and Spring Quarters which is co-taught each quarter by one instructor from HSSEAS and one from the Brain Research Institute. Each seminar introduces students to a single area of neuroengineering and challenges them to develop critical skills in evaluating primary research papers and to design new approaches to current problems. Topics include pattern generation, sensory signal processing, initiation and control of movement, microsensors, neural networks, photonics, and robotics.

Research Seminars. In addition to the formal coursework listed above, all students attend a series of weekly research seminars that allow both students and faculty members to become more conversant with the broad range of subjects in neuroengineering. In Fall Quarter, a series called "Meet the Professors" consists of informal talks by UCLA faculty members and collaborative researchers from the surrounding area. The series introduces the faculty to the students and vice versa, and helps faculty in neuroscience and engineering discover opportunities for collaboration that engage students in the neuroengineering program. In Winter and Spring Quarters, seminar speakers are selected from commercial, academic, and government organizations.

Seminars (Second-Year). All second-year students take a seminar course each quarter specifically designed for the neuroengineering program. Each course is co-taught by one faculty member from the Brain Research Institute and one from HSSEAS and often include outside UCLA faculty speakers or members of the Industrial Advisory Board.

Lower Division Courses

19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars. (1)

Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

99. Student Research Program. (1 to 2)

Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

Upper Division Courses

C101. Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours; outside study, six hours. Designed for physical sciences, life sciences, and engineering students. Introduction to wide scope of biomedical engineering via treatment of selected important individual topics by small team of specialists. Concurrently scheduled with course C201. Letter grading. Mr. Kamei (F)

CM102. Basic Human Biology for Biomedical Engineers I. (4)

(Same as Physiological Science CM102.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Preparation: human molecular biology, biochemistry, and cell biology. Not open for credit to Physiological Science majors. Broad overview of basic biological activities and organization of human body in system (organ/tissue) to system basis, with particular emphasis on molecular basis. Modeling/simulation of functional aspect of biological system included. Actual demonstration of biomedical instruments, as well as visits to biomedical facilities. Concurrently scheduled with course CM202. Letter grading. Mr. Grundfest (F)

CM103. Basic Human Biology for Biomedical Engineers II. (4)

(Same as Physiological Science CM103.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Preparation: human molecular biology, biochemistry, and cell biology. Not open for credit to Physiological Science majors. Molecular-level understanding of human anatomy and physiology in selected organ systems (digestive, skin, musculoskeletal, endocrine, immune, urinary, reproductive). System-specific modeling/simulations (immune regulation, wound healing, muscle mechanics and energetics, acid-base balance, excretion). Functional basis of biomedical instrumentation (dialysis, artificial skin, pathogen detectors, ultrasound, birth-control drug delivery). Concurrently scheduled with course CM203. Letter grading. Mr. Grundfest (W)

CM140. Introduction to Biomechanics. (4)

(Same as Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering CM140.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 101, 102, 156A. Introduction to mechanical functions of human body; skeletal adaptations to optimize load transfer, mobility, and function. Dynamics and kinematics. Fluid mechanics applications. Heat and mass transfer. Power generation. Laboratory simulations and tests. Concurrently scheduled with course CM240. Letter grading. Mr. Gupta (W)

C141L. Biomechanics Laboratory. (4)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course CM140 or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 156A. Hands-on laboratory pertaining to mechanical testing and analysis of long bone specimens. Students, working in pairs, engage in all aspects of procedures. Fundamentals include design and fabrication of signal processing circuitry for use in data acquisition process, including bridge completion circuits, amplifiers, and passive filters; computerized data acquisition using Lab View and A/D input/output (I/O) board; strain measurements on metallic and bone specimens. Finite element analysis of structure under investigation; comparison of experimental, theoretical, and computational results. Concurrently scheduled with course C241L. Letter grading.

CM145. Molecular Biotechnology for Engineers. (4)

(Same as Chemical Engineering CM145.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Selected topics in molecular biology that form foundation of biotechnology and biomedical industry today. Topics include recombinant DNA technology, molecular research tools, manipulation of gene expression, directed mutagenesis and protein engineering, DNA-based diagnostics and DNA microarrays, antibody and protein-based diagnostics, genomics and bioinformatics, isolation of human genes, gene therapy, and tissue engineering. Concurrently scheduled with course CM245. Letter grading. Mr. Liao (F)

CM150. Introduction to Micromachining and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS). (4)

(Formerly numbered M150.) (Same as Electrical Engineering CM150 and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering CM180.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20L, Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL. Corequisite: course CM150L. Introduction to micromachining technologies and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Methods of micromachining and how these methods can be used to produce variety of MEMS, including microstructures, microsensors, and microactuators. Students design microfabrication processes capable of achieving desired MEMS device. Concurrently scheduled with course CM250A. Letter grading. Mr. Judy (F)

CM150L. Introduction to Micromachining and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Laboratory. (2)

(Formerly numbered M150L.) (Same as Electrical Engineering CM150L and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering CM180L.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours; outside study, one hour. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20L, Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL. Corequisite: course CM150. Hands-on introduction to micromachining technologies and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) laboratory. Methods of micromachining and how these methods can be used to produce variety of MEMS, including microstructures, microsensors, and microactuators. Students go through process of fabricating MEMS device. Concurrently scheduled with course CM250L. Letter grading. Mr. Judy (F)

C151. Nanofabrication of Biomedical Systems Using Nonconventional Materials. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M150L (or Electrical Engineering M150L). Use of nontraditional substrates and materials in fabrication of biomedical nanosystems. Materials and fabrication issues, post-processing integration, compatibility with standard processes, and standard fabrication environment. Packaging concerns. Imaging and diagnostics techniques. Reliability issues. Concurrently scheduled with course C251. Letter grading.

C170. Energy-Tissue Interactions. (4)

Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisites: Electrical Engineering 172, 175, Life Sciences 3, Physics 17. Corequisite: course C170L. Introduction to therapeutic and diagnostic use of energy delivery devices in medical and dental applications, with emphasis on understanding fundamental mechanisms underlying various types of energy-tissue interactions. Concurrently scheduled with course C270. Letter grading. Mr. Grundfest (F)

C170L. Introduction to Techniques in Studying Laser-Tissue Interaction. (2)

Laboratory, four hours; outside study, two hours. Corequisite: course C170. Introduction to simulation and experimental techniques used in studying laser-tissue interactions. Topics include computer simulations of light propagation in tissue, measuring absorption spectra of tissue/tissue phantoms, making tissue phantoms, determination of optical properties of different tissues, techniques of temperature distribution measurements. Concurrently scheduled with course C270L. Letter grading.

C171. Laser-Tissue Interaction II: Biologic Spectroscopy. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course C170. Designed for physical sciences, life sciences, and engineering majors. Introduction to optical spectroscopy principles, design of spectroscopic measurement devices, optical properties of tissues, and fluorescence spectroscopy biologic media. Concurrently scheduled with course C271. Letter grading. Mr. Grundfest (W)

CM180. Introduction to Biomaterials. (4)

(Same as Materials Science CM180.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20B, and 20L, or Materials Science 104. Engineering materials used in medicine and dentistry for repair and/or restoration of damaged natural tissues. Topics include relationships between material properties, suitability to task, surface chemistry, processing and treatment methods, and biocompatibility. Concurrently scheduled with course CM280. Letter grading. Mr. Wu (W)

C181. Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions. (4)

Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: course CM180. In-depth exploration of host cellular response to biomaterials: vascular response, interface, and clotting, biocompatibility, animal models, inflammation, infection, extracellular matrix, cell adhesion, and role of mechanical forces. Concurrently scheduled with course C281. Letter grading. Mr. Wu (Sp)

C185. Introduction to Tissue Engineering. (4)

Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisites: course CM102 or CM202, Chemistry 20A, 20B, 20L. Tissue engineering applies principles of biology and physical sciences with engineering approach to regenerate tissues and organs. Guiding principles for proper selection of three basic components for tissue engineering: cells, scaffolds, and molecular signals. Concurrently scheduled with course C285. Letter grading. Mr. Wu (Sp)

M186A. Introduction to Cybernetics, Biomodeling, and Biomedical Computing. (2)

(Formerly numbered M196A.) (Same as Computational and Systems Biology M186A and Computer Science M186A.) Lecture, two hours. Requisites: Mathematics 31A, 31B, Program in Computing 10A. Strongly recommended for students with potential interest in biomedical engineering/biocomputing fields or in Computational and Systems Biology as a major. Introduction and survey of topics in cybernetics, biomodeling, biocomputing, and related bioengineering disciplines. Lectures presented by faculty currently performing research in one of the areas; some sessions include laboratory tours. P/NP grading. Mr. DiStefano (W)

CM186B. Computational Systems Biology: Modeling and Simulation of Biological Systems. (5)

(Formerly numbered M186B.) (Same as Computational and Systems Biology M186B and Computer Science CM186B.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, three hours. Corequisite: Electrical Engineering 102. Dynamic biosystems modeling and computer simulation methods for studying biological/biomedical processes and systems at multiple levels of organization. Control system, multicompartmental, predator-prey, pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamic (PD), and other structural modeling methods applied to life sciences problems at molecular, cellular (biochemical pathways/networks), organ, and organismic levels. Both theory- and data-driven modeling, with focus on translating biomodeling goals and data into mathematics models and implementing them for simulation and analysis. Basics of numerical simulation algorithms, with modeling software exercises in class and PC laboratory assignments. Concurrently scheduled with course CM286B. Letter grading. Mr. DiStefano (F)

CM186L. Biomedical Systems/Biocybernetics Research Laboratory. (2 to 4)

(Formerly numbered CM196L.) (Same as Computational and Systems Biology M186L and Computer Science CM186L.) Laboratory, four hours. Requisite: course CM186B. Special laboratory techniques and experience in biocybernetics research. Laboratory instruments, their use, design, and/or modification for research in life sciences. Special research hardware, firmware, software. Use of simulation in experimental laboratory. Laboratory automation and safety. Comprehensive experiment design. Radioactive isotopes and kinetic studies. Experimental animals, controls. Concurrently scheduled with course CM286L. Letter grading. Mr. DiStefano (Sp)

C187. Applied Tissue Engineering: Clinical and Industrial Perspectives. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course CM102, Chemistry 20A, 20B, 20L, Life Sciences 1 or 2. Overview of central topics of tissue engineering, with focus on how to build artificial tissues into regulated clinically viable products. Topics include biomaterials selection, cell source, delivery methods, FDA approval processes, and physical/chemical and biological testing. Case studies include skin and artificial skin, bone and cartilage, blood vessels, neurotissue engineering, and liver, kidney, and other organs. Clinical and industrial perspectives of tissue engineering products. Manufacturing constraints, clinical limitations, and regulatory challenges in design and development of tissue-engineering devices. Concurrently scheduled with course C287. Letter grading. Mr. Wu (F)

188. Special Courses in Biomedical Engineering. (4)

(Formerly numbered 198.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Special topics in biomedical engineering for undergraduate students that are taught on experimental or temporary basis, such as those taught by resident and visiting faculty members. Letter grading.

Graduate Courses

C201. Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours; outside study, six hours. Designed for physical sciences, life sciences, and engineering students. Introduction to wide scope of biomedical engineering via treatment of selected important individual topics by small team of specialists. Concurrently scheduled with course C101. Letter grading. Mr. Kamei (F)

CM202. Basic Human Biology for Biomedical Engineers I. (4)

(Same as Physiological Science CM204.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Preparation: human molecular biology, biochemistry, and cell biology. Not open for credit to Physiological Science majors. Broad overview of basic biological activities and organization of human body in system (organ/tissue) to system basis, with particular emphasis on molecular basis. Modeling/simulation of functional aspect of biological system included. Actual demonstration of biomedical instruments, as well as visits to biomedical facilities. Concurrently scheduled with course CM102. Letter grading. Mr. Grundfest (F)

CM203. Basic Human Biology for Biomedical Engineers II. (4)

(Same as Physiological Science CM203.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Preparation: human molecular biology, biochemistry, and cell biology. Not open for credit to Physiological Science majors. Molecular-level understanding of human anatomy and physiology in selected organ systems (digestive, skin, musculoskeletal, endocrine, immune, urinary, reproductive). System-specific modeling/simulations (immune regulation, wound healing, muscle mechanics and energetics, acid-base balance, excretion). Functional basis of biomedical instrumentation (dialysis, artificial skin, pathogen detectors, ultrasound, birth-control drug delivery). Concurrently scheduled with course CM103. Letter grading. Mr. Grundfest (W)

M214A. Digital Speech Processing. (4)

(Same as Electrical Engineering M214A.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: Electrical Engineering 113. Theory and applications of digital processing of speech signals. Mathematical models of human speech production and perception mechanisms, speech analysis/synthesis. Techniques include linear prediction, filter-bank models, and homomorphic filtering. Applications to speech synthesis, automatic recognition, and hearing aids. Letter grading. Ms. Alwan (W)

M215. Biochemical Reaction Engineering. (4)

(Same as Chemical Engineering CM215.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemical Engineering 101C and 106, or Chemistry 156. Use of previously learned concepts of biophysical chemistry, thermodynamics, transport phenomena, and reaction kinetics to develop tools needed for technical design and economic analysis of biological reactors. Letter grading. Mr. Liao (Sp)

M217. Biomedical Imaging. (4)

(Same as Electrical Engineering M217.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: Electrical Engineering 114D or 211A. Mathematical principles of medical imaging modalities: X-ray, computed tomography, positron-emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging. Topics include basic principles of each imaging system, image reconstruction algorithms, system configurations and their effects on reconstruction algorithms, specialized imaging techniques for specific applications such as flow imaging. Letter grading.

220. Introduction to Medical Informatics. (2)

Lecture, two hours; outside study, four hours. Designed for graduate students. Introduction to research topics and issues in medical informatics for students new to field. Definition of this emerging field of study, current research efforts, and future directions in research. Key issues in medical informatics to expose students to different application domains, such as information system architectures, data and process modeling, information extraction and representations, information retrieval and visualization, health services research, telemedicine. Emphasis on current research endeavors and applications. S/U grading. Mr. Kangarloo (F)

221. Human Anatomy and Physiology for Medical Informatics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Corequisite: course 222. Designed for graduate students. Introduction to basic human anatomy and physiology, with particular emphasis on visualization of anatomy and physiology from imaging perspective. Topics include chest, cardiac, neurology, gastrointestinal/genitourinary, and musculoskeletal systems. Examination of basic imaging physics (magnetic resonance, computed tomography, ultrasound, computed radiography) to provide context for imaging modalities predominantly used to view human anatomy. Geared toward nonphysicians who require more formal understanding of human anatomy/physiology. Letter grading. Mr. El-Saden (F)

222. Clinical Rotation Medical Informatics. (2)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Corequisite: course 221. Designed for graduate students. Clinical rotation through medical imaging modalities and clinical environments. Exposure to challenges of medical practice today and clinical usage of imaging, including computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and other traditional forms of image acquisition. Designed to provide students with real-world exposure to practical applications of imaging and to reinforce human anatomy and physiology concepts from other courses. Four hours per week in clinical environments, observing clinicians in different medical environments to gain appreciation of current practices, imaging, and information systems. Participation in clinical noon conferences to further broaden exposure and understanding of medical problems. S/U grading. Mr. Kangarloo (F)

223A-223B-223C. Programming Laboratories for Medical Informatics I, II, III. (4-4-4)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Designed for graduate students. Programming laboratories to support coursework in other medical informatics core curriculum courses. Exposure to programming concepts for medical applications, with focus on basic abstraction techniques used in image processing and medical information system infrastructures (HL7, DICOM). Letter grading. 223A. Integrated with course 226 to reinforce concepts presented with practical experience. Projects focus on understanding medical networking issues and implementation of basic protocols for healthcare environment, with emphasis on use of DICOM. 223B. Requisite: course 223A. Integrated with courses 224A and 227 to reinforce concepts presented with practical experience. Projects focus on medical image manipulation and decision support systems. 223C. Requisite: course 223B. Integrated with courses 224B and 225 to reinforce concepts presented with practical experience. Projects focus on medical image storage and retrieval. Mr. Meng (F,W,Sp)

224A. Physics and Informatics of Medical Imaging. (4)

Lecture, four hours; laboratory, eight hours. Requisites: Mathematics 33A, 33B. Designed for graduate students. Introduction to principles of medical imaging and imaging informatics for nonphysicists. Overview of core imaging modalities: computed radiography (CR), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR), and ultrasound (US). Emphasis on physics of image formation and image reconstruction methods. Overview of DICOM data models, basic medical image processing, content-based image retrieval, PACS, and image data management. Current research efforts, with focus on clinical applications and new types of information available. Geared toward nonphysicists to provide basic understanding of issues related to basic medical image acquisition. Letter grading. Mr. Sinha (W)

224B. Advanced Imaging for Informatics. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 224A. Additional modalities and current research in imaging. Topics include nuclear medicine, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), MR diffusion/perfusion, and optical imaging, with focus on image analysis and visualization tools. Basic physics principles behind these newer imaging concepts, with exposure to seminal works. Current research efforts, with focus on clinical applications and new types of information available. Geared toward nonphysicists to provide basic understanding of issues related to advanced medical image acquisition and to understand functionality of imaging databases and image models facilitating sharing of imaging data for clinical and research purposes. Letter grading. Mr. Sinha (Sp)

M225. Bioseparations and Bioprocess Engineering. (4)

(Same as Chemical Engineering CM225.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: Chemical Engineering 101C and 103, or Chemistry 156. Separation strategies, unit operations, and economic factors used to design processes for isolating and purifying materials like whole cells, enzymes, food additives, or pharmaceuticals that are products of biological reactors. Letter grading. Mr. Monbouquette (W)

226. Medical Knowledge Representation. (4)

Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for graduate students. Issues related to medical knowledge representation and its application in healthcare processes. Topics include data structures used for representing knowledge (conceptual graphs, frame-based models), different data models for representing spatio-temporal information, rule-based implementations, current statistical methods for discovery of knowledge (data mining, statistical classifiers, and hierarchical classification), and basic information retrieval. Review of work in constructing ontologies, with focus on problems in implementation and definition. Common medical ontologies, coding schemes, and standardized indices/terminologies (SNOMEF, UMLS, MeSH, LOINC). Letter grading. Mr. Taira (Sp)

227. Medical Information Infrastructures and Internet Technologies. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for graduate students. Introduction to networking, communications, and information infrastructures in medical environment. Exposure to basic concepts related to networking at several levels: low-level (TCP/IP, services), medium-level (network topologies), and high-level (distributed computing, Web-based services) implementations. Commonly used medical communication protocols (HL7, DICOM) and current medical information systems (HIS, RIS, PACS). Advances in networking, such as wireless, Internet2/gigabit networks, peer-to-peer topologies. Introduction to security and encryption in networked environments. Letter grading. Mr. Bui (F)

228. Medical Decision Making. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for graduate students. Overview of issues related to medical decision making. Introduction to concept of evidence-based medicine and decision processes related to process of care and outcomes. Basic probability and statistics to understand research results and evaluations, and algorithmic methods for decision-making processes (Bayes theorem, decision trees). Study design, hypothesis testing, and estimation. Focus on technical advances in medical decision support systems and expert systems, with review of classic and current research. Introduction to common statistical and decision-making software packages to familiarize students with current tools. Letter grading. Mr. Kangarloo (W)

230. Engineering Principles of Ultrasound. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Introduction to science and technology of acoustics in biological systems, starting with physical acoustics, acoustic wave (Helmholtz) equation, acoustic propagation and scattering in homogeneous and inhomogeneous media, and acoustic attentuation and davitation phenomena. Acoustic impedance, equivalent circuits, and network models. Electroacoustic transducers (piezoelectric and MEMS) and radiators. Acoustic generation, modulation, and pulse forming. Acoustic noise mechanisms. Receiving and processing of acoustic waves in presence of noise. Letter grading. Mr. Brown (F)

CM240. Introduction to Biomechanics. (4)

(Same as Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering CM240.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 101, 102, 156A. Introduction to mechanical functions of human body; skeletal adaptations to optimize load transfer, mobility, and function. Dynamics and kinematics. Fluid mechanics applications. Heat and mass transfer. Power generation. Laboratory simulations and tests. Concurrently scheduled with course CM140. Letter grading. Mr. Gupta (W)

C241L. Biomechanics Laboratory. (4)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course CM140 or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 156A. Hands-on laboratory pertaining to mechanical testing and analysis of long bone specimens. Students, working in pairs, engage in all aspects of procedures. Fundamentals include design and fabrication of signal processing circuitry for use in data acquisition process, including bridge completion circuits, amplifiers, and passive filters; computerized data acquisition using Lab View and A/D input/output (I/O) board; strain measurements on metallic and bone specimens. Finite element analysis of structure under investigation; comparison of experimental, theoretical, and computational results. Concurrently scheduled with course C141L. Letter grading.

CM245. Molecular Biotechnology for Engineers. (4)

(Same as Chemical Engineering CM245.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Selected topics in molecular biology that form foundation of biotechnology and biomedical industry today. Topics include recombinant DNA technology, molecular research tools, manipulation of gene expression, directed mutagenesis and protein engineering, DNA-based diagnostics and DNA microarrays, antibody and protein-based diagnostics, genomics and bioinformatics, isolation of human genes, gene therapy, and tissue engineering. Concurrently scheduled with course CM145. Letter grading. Mr. Liao (F)

M248. Introduction to Biological Imaging. (4)

(Same as Biomedical Physics M248 and Pharmacology M248.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Exploration of role of biological imaging in modern biology and medicine, including imaging physics, instrumentation, image processing, and applications of imaging for a range of modalities. Practical experience provided through a series of imaging laboratories. Letter grading.

CM250A. Introduction to Micromachining and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS). (4)

(Formerly numbered M250A.) (Same as Electrical Engineering CM250A and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering CM280A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20L, Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL. Corequisite: course CM250L. Introduction to micromachining technologies and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Methods of micromachining and how these methods can be used to produce variety of MEMS, including microstructures, microsensors, and microactuators. Students design microfabrication processes capable of achieving desired MEMS device. Concurrently scheduled with course CM150. Letter grading. Mr. Judy (W)

M250B. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Device Physics and Design. (4)

(Same as Electrical Engineering M250B and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M282.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M250A. Introduction to MEMS design. Design methods, design rules, sensing and actuation mechanisms, microsensors, and microactuators. Designing MEMS to be produced with both foundry and nonfoundry processes. Computer-aided design for MEMS. Design project required. Letter grading. Mr. Wu (Sp)

CM250L. Introduction to Micromachining and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Laboratory. (2)

(Same as Electrical Engineering CM250L and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering CM280L.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours; outside study, one hour. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20L, Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL. Corequisite: course CM250A. Hands-on introduction to micromachining technologies and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) laboratory. Methods of micromachining and how these methods can be used to produce variety of MEMS, including microstructures, microsensors, and microactuators. Students go through process of fabricating MEMS device. Concurrently scheduled with course CM150L. Letter grading. Mr. Judy (F)

C251. Nanofabrication of Biomedical Systems Using Nonconventional Materials. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: course M150L (or Electrical Engineering M150L), M250B. Use of nontraditional substrates and materials in fabrication of biomedical nanosystems. Materials and fabrication issues, post-processing integration, compatibility with standard processes, and standard fabrication environment. Packaging concerns. Imaging and diagnostics techniques. Reliability issues. Concurrently scheduled with course C151. Letter grading.

257. Engineering Mechanics of Motor Proteins and Cytoskeleton. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: Mathematics 32A, 32B, 33A, 33B, Life Sciences 3, Physics 1A, 1B, 1C. Introduction to physics of motor proteins and cytoskeleton: mass, stiffness and damping of proteins, thermal forces and diffusion, chemical forces, polymer mechanics, structures of cytoskeletal filaments, mechanics of cytoskeleton, polymerization of cytoskeletal filaments, force generation by cytoskeletal filaments, active polymerization, motor protein structure and operation. Emphasis on engineering perspective. Letter grading.

M259H. Biomechanics of Traumatic Injury. (4)

(Same as Environmental Health Sciences M259H.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for graduate students. Introduction to applied biomechanics of accidental injury causation and prevention; discussion of mechanisms of injury that result in bone and soft tissue trauma; discussion of mechanisms of healing for effective rehabilitation after traumatic injury. Letter grading. Mr. Liu (W)

M260. Neuroengineering. (4)

(Formerly numbered 260.) (Same as Neuroscience M206.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, three hours. Requisites: Mathematics 32A, Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology 100, 171. Introduction to principles and technologies of neural recording and stimulation. Neurophysiology; clinical electrophysiology (EEG, evoked potentials, inverse problem, preoperative brain recording), extracellular microelectrodes and recording (field potentials and single units), chronic recording with extracellular electrodes; electrode biocompatibility, tissue damage, electrode and cable survival; intracellular recording and glass pipettes electrodes, iontophoresis; imaging neural activity (Ca imaging, voltage-sensitive dyes), intrinsic optical imaging; MRI, fMRI. Letter grading. Mr. Judy (Sp)

M261A-M261B-M261C. Evaluation of Research Literature in Neuroengineering. (2-2-2)

(Same as Neuroscience M212A-M212B-M212C.) Discussion, two hours. Critical discussion and analysis of current literature related to neuroengineering research. S/U grading.

M263. Neuroanatomy: Structure and Function of Nervous System. (4)

(Formerly numbered M263A-M263B.) (Same as Neuroscience M203.) Lecture, three hours; discussion/laboratory, three hours. Anatomy of central and peripheral nervous system at cellular histological and regional systems level, with emphasis on contemporary experimental approaches to morphological study of nervous system in discussions of circuitry and neurochemical anatomy of major brain regions. Consideration of representative vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. Letter grading.

C270. Energy-Tissue Interactions. (4)

Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisites: Electrical Engineering 172, 175, Life Sciences 3, Physics 17. Introduction to therapeutic and diagnostic use of energy delivery devices in medical and dental applications, with emphasis on understanding fundamental mechanisms underlying various types of energy-tissue interactions. Concurrently scheduled with course C170. Letter grading. Mr. Grundfest (F)

C270L. Introduction to Techniques in Studying Laser-Tissue Interaction. (2)

Laboratory, four hours; outside study, two hours. Corequisite: course C270. Introduction to simulation and experimental techniques used in studying laser-tissue interactions. Topics include computer simulations of light propagation in tissue, measuring absorption spectra of tissue/tissue phantoms, making tissue phantoms, determination of optical properties of different tissues, techniques of temperature distribution measurements. Concurrently scheduled with course C170L. Letter grading.

C271. Laser-Tissue Interaction II: Biologic Spectroscopy. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course C270. Designed for physical sciences, life sciences, and engineering majors. Introduction to optical spectroscopy principles, design of spectroscopic measurement devices, optical properties of tissues, and fluorescence spectroscopy biologic media. Concurrently scheduled with course C171. Letter grading. Mr. Grundfest (W)

CM280. Introduction to Biomaterials. (4)

(Same as Materials Science CM280.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20B, and 20L, or Materials Science 104. Engineering materials used in medicine and dentistry for repair and/or restoration of damaged natural tissues. Topics include relationships between material properties, suitability to task, surface chemistry, processing and treatment methods, and biocompatibility. Concurrently scheduled with course CM180. Letter grading. Mr. Wu (W)

C281. Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions. (4)

Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: course CM280. In-depth exploration of host cellular response to biomaterials: vascular response, interface, and clotting, biocompatibility, animal models, inflammation, infection, extracellular matrix, cell adhesion, and role of mechanical forces. Concurrently scheduled with course C181. Letter grading. Mr. Wu (Sp)

282. Biomaterial Interfaces. (4)

Lecture, four hours; laboratory, eight hours. Requisite: course CM180 or CM280. Function, utility, and biocompatibility of biomaterials depend critically on their surface and interfacial properties. Discussion of morphology and composition of biomaterials and nanoscales, mesoscales, and macroscales, techniques for characterizing structure and properties of biomaterial interfaces, and methods for designing and fabricating biomaterials with prescribed structure and properties in vitro and in vivo. Letter grading. Ms. Maynard (W)

C285. Introduction to Tissue Engineering. (4)

Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisites: course CM102 or CM202, Chemistry 20A, 20B, 20L. Tissue engineering applies principles of biology and physical sciences with engineering approach to regenerate tissues and organs. Guiding principles for proper selection of three basic components for tissue engineering: cells, scaffolds, and molecular signals. Concurrently scheduled with course C185. Letter grading. Mr. Wu (Sp)

CM286B. Computational Systems Biology: Modeling and Simulation of Biological Systems. (5)

(Same as Computer Science CM286B.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, three hours. Corequisite: Electrical Engineering 102. Dynamic biosystems modeling and computer simulation methods for studying biological/biomedical processes and systems at multiple levels of organization. Control system, multicompartmental, predator-prey, pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamic (PD), and other structural modeling methods applied to life sciences problems at molecular, cellular (biochemical pathways/networks), organ, and organismic levels. Both theory- and data-driven modeling, with focus on translating biomodeling goals and data into mathematics models and implementing them for simulation and analysis. Basics of numerical simulation algorithms, with modeling software exercises in class and PC laboratory assignments. Concurrently scheduled with course CM186B. Letter grading. Mr. DiStefano (F)

CM286L. Biomedical Systems/Biocybernetics Research Laboratory. (2 to 4)

(Formerly numbered CM296L.) (Same as Computer Science CM286L.) Laboratory, four hours. Requisite: course CM286B. Special laboratory techniques and experience in biocybernetics research. Laboratory instruments, their use, design, and/or modification for research in life sciences. Special research hardware, firmware, software. Use of simulation in experimental laboratory. Laboratory automation and safety. Comprehensive experiment design. Radioactive isotopes and kinetic studies. Experimental animals, controls. Concurrently scheduled with course CM186L. Letter grading. Mr. DiStefano (Sp)

C287. Applied Tissue Engineering: Clinical and Industrial Perspectives. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course CM202, Chemistry 20A, 20B, 20L, Life Sciences 1 or 2. Overview of central topics of tissue engineering, with focus on how to build artificial tissues into regulated clinically viable products. Topics include biomaterials selection, cell source, delivery methods, FDA approval processes, and physical/chemical and biological testing. Case studies include skin and artificial skin, bone and cartilage, blood vessels, neurotissue engineering, and liver, kidney, and other organs. Clinical and industrial perspectives of tissue engineering products. Manufacturing constraints, clinical limitations, and regulatory challenges in design and development of tissue-engineering devices. Concurrently scheduled with course C187. Letter grading. Mr. Wu (F)

295A-295Z. Seminars: Research Topics in Biomedical Engineering and Bioengineering. (1 to 4)

Seminar, one to four hours. Limited to biomedical engineering graduate students. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in bioengineering. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. Student presentation of projects in research specialty. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading:

295A. Nanotechnology Research.

295B. Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Research.

295C. Minimally Invasive and Laser Research.

295D. Hybrid Device Research.

295E. Molecular Cell Bioengineering Research.

295F. Biopolymer Materials and Chemistry.

M296A. Advanced Modeling Methodology for Dynamic Biomedical Systems. (4)

(Same as Computer Science M296A and Medicine M270C.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: Electrical Engineering 141 or 142 or Mathematics 115A or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 171A. Development of dynamic systems modeling methodology for physiological, biomedical, pharmacological, chemical, and related systems. Control system, multicompartmental, noncompartmental, and input/output models, linear and nonlinear. Emphasis on model applications, limitations, and relevance in biomedical sciences and other limited data environments. Problem solving in PC laboratory. Letter grading. Mr. DiStefano (F)

M296B. Optimal Parameter Estimation and Experiment Design for Biomedical Systems. (4)

(Same as Biomathematics M270, Computer Science M296B, and Medicine M270D.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M296A or Biomathematics 220. Estimation methodology and model parameter estimation algorithms for fitting dynamic system models to biomedical data. Model discrimination methods. Theory and algorithms for designing optimal experiments for developing and quantifying models, with special focus on optimal sampling schedule design for kinetic models. Exploration of PC software for model building and optimal experiment design via applications in physiology and pharmacology. Letter grading. Mr. DiStefano (W)

M296C. Advanced Topics and Research in Biomedical Systems Modeling and Computing. (4)

(Same as Computer Science M296C and Medicine M270E.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M296A. Recommended: course M296B. Research techniques and experience on special topics involving models, modeling methods, and model/computing in biological and medical sciences. Review and critique of literature. Research problem searching and formulation. Approaches to solutions. Individual M.S.- and Ph.D.-level project training. Letter grading. Mr. DiStefano (Sp)

M296D. Introduction to Computational Cardiology. (4)

(Same as Computer Science M296D.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course CM186B. Introduction to mathematical modeling and computer simulation of cardiac electrophysiological process. Ionic models of action potential (AP). Theory of AP propagation in one-dimensional and two-dimensional cardiac tissue. Simulation on sequential and parallel supercomputers, choice of numerical algorithms, to optimize accuracy and to provide computational stability. Letter grading. Mr. Kogan (F,Sp)

298. Special Studies in Biomedical Engineering. (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Study of selected topics in biomedical engineering taught by resident and visiting faculty members. Letter grading.

299. Seminar: Biomedical Engineering Topics. (2)

Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Designed for graduate biomedical engineering students. Seminar by leading academic and industrial biomedical engineers from UCLA, other universities, and biomedical engineering companies such as Baxter, Amgen, Medtronics, and Guidant on development and application of recent technological advances in the discipline. Exploration of cutting-edge developments and challenges in wound healing models, stem cell biology, angiogenesis, signal transduction, gene therapy, cDNA microarray technology, bioartificial cultivation, nano- and micro-hybrid devices, scaffold engineering, and bioinformatics. S/U grading. Mr. Wu (F,W,Sp)

375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum. (4)

Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at the University. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

596. Directed Individual or Tutorial Studies. (2 to 8)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate biomedical engineering students. Petition forms to request enrollment may be obtained from program office. Supervised investigation of advanced technical problems. S/U grading.

597A. Preparation for M.S. Comprehensive Examination. (2 to 12)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate biomedical engineering students. Reading and preparation for M.S. comprehensive examination. S/U grading.

597B. Preparation for Ph.D. Preliminary Examinations. (2 to 16)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate biomedical engineering students. S/U grading.

597C. Preparation for Ph.D. Oral Qualifying Examination. (2 to 16)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate biomedical engineering students. Preparation for oral qualifying examination, including preliminary research on dissertation. S/U grading.

598. Research for and Preparation of M.S. Thesis. (2 to 12)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate biomedical engineering students. Supervised independent research for M.S. candidates, including thesis prospectus. S/U grading.

599. Research for and Preparation of Ph.D. Dissertation. (2 to 16)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate biomedical engineering students. Usually taken after students have been advanced to candidacy. S/U grading.