Bioengineering

UCLA
7523 Boelter Hall
Box 951600
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1600

 

(310) 794-5945
fax: (310) 794-5956
e-mail: bioeng@ea.ucla.edu
http://www.bioeng.ucla.edu

Timothy J. Deming, Ph.D., Chair

Professors

Denise Aberle, M.D.

Timothy J. Deming, Ph.D.

Warren S. Grundfest, M.D., FACS

Associate Professors

James Dunn, M.D., Ph.D.

Benjamin M. Wu, D.D.S., Ph.D.

Assistant Professors

Daniel T. Kamei, Ph.D.

Andrea M. Kasko, Ph.D.

Jacob J. Schmidt, Ph.D.

Adjunct Professor

Alfred Mann, M.S.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Alex Bui, Ph.D.

Scope and Objectives

Faculty members in the Department of Bioengineering believe that the interface between biology and the physical sciences represents an exciting area for science in the twenty-first century. Bioengineering has established itself as an independent field and engineering discipline, resulting in the formation of many new bioengineering departments and the redefinition of established programs. Faculty members have embraced this unique opportunity by developing an innovative curriculum, creating state-of-the-art facilities, and performing cutting-edge research.

Instead of treating bioengineering as an application of traditional engineering, it is taught as an applied science discipline in its own right. The bioengineering program is a structured compilation of unique forward-looking courses dedicated to producing graduates who are well-grounded in the fundamental sciences and highly proficient in rigorous analytical engineering tools necessary for lifelong success in the wide range of possible bioengineering careers. The program provides a unique engineering educational experience that responds to the growing needs and demands of bioengineering.

Department Mission

Bioengineering is a diverse multidisciplinary field that has established itself as an independent engineering discipline. The school is developing a small yet innovative Bioengineering Department that is dedicated to producing graduates who are well-grounded in fundamental sciences and the rigorous analytical engineering tools necessary for lifelong success in the many possible bioengineering careers.

Undergraduate Program Objectives

The goal of the bioengineering curriculum is to provide students with the fundamental scientific knowledge and engineering tools necessary for graduate study in engineering or scientific disciplines, continued education in health professional schools, or employment in industry. There are three main objectives: (1) to provide students with rigorous training in engineering and fundamental sciences, (2) to provide knowledge and experience in state-of-the-art research in bioengineering, and (3) to provide problem-solving and team-building skills to succeed in a career in bioengineering.

Undergraduate Study

Bioengineering B.S.

Preparation for the Major

Required: Bioengineering 10; Chemistry and Biochemistry 20A, 20B, 20L, 30A, 30AL, 30B, 30BL; Computer Science 31; Life Sciences 2 (satisfies HSSEAS GE life sciences requirement), 3, 4; Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B, 33A, 33B; Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL.

The Major

Required: Bioengineering 100, 110, 120, 165, 176, 180, 180L, 181, 181L, 182A, 182B, 182C, Chemistry and Biochemistry 153A; three breadth courses (12 units) selected from an approved list available in the Office of Academic and Student Affairs; and two major field elective courses (8 units) from Biomedical Engineering C101, CM102, CM103, CM145, CM150, CM150L, C170, C171, CM180, C181, C185, CM186L.

For information on University and general education requirements, see Requirements for B.S. Degrees on page 21 or http://www.registrar.ucla.edu/ge/GE-ENGRNew06-07.pdf.

Graduate Study

New graduate programs, leading to M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Bioengineering, are pending approval. Program requirements will be updated online at http://www.bioeng.ucla.edu, pending final approval.

Individuals who would like to conduct research in the laboratories of the professors in the Bioengineering Department should apply to the graduate program in the Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program (http://www.bme.ucla.edu).

Faculty Areas of Thesis Guidance

Professors

Denis Aberle, M.D. (Kansas, 1979)

Medical imaging informatics: imaging-based clinical trials, medical data visualization

Timothy J. Deming, Ph.D. (UC Berkeley, 1993)

Polymer synthesis, polymer processing, supramolecular materials, organometallic catalysis, biomimetic materials, polypeptides

Warren S. Grundfest, M.D., FACS (Columbia, 1980)

Excimer laser, minimally invasive surgery, biological spectroscopy

Associate Professors

James Dunn, M.D., Ph.D. (Harvard, MIT, 1992)

Tissue engineering, stem cell therapy, regenerative medicine

Benjamin M. Wu, D.D.S. (U. Pacific, 1987), Ph.D. (MIT, 1997)

Biomaterials, cell-material interactions, materials processing, tissue engineering, prosthetic and regenerative dentistry

Assistant Professors

Daniel T. Kamei, Ph.D. (MIT, 2001)

Molecular cell bioengineering, rational design of molecular therapeutics, systems-level analyses of cellular processes, molecular modeling, quantitative cell biology

Andrea M. Kasko, Ph.D. (U. Akron, 2004)

Polymer synthesis, biomaterials, tissue engineering, cell-material interactions

Jacob J. Schmidt, Ph.D. (Minnesota, 1999)

Bioengineering and biophysics at micro and nanoscales, membrane protein engineering, biological-inorganic hybrid devices

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Alex Bui, Ph.D. (UCLA, 2000)

Medical imaging informatics: probabilistic data modeling, visualization of medical information, distributed information architectures for biomedical research

Lower Division Courses

1. Physics for Bioengineers I. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Corequisite: Mathematics 31A. Introduction to physics and biophysics. Basic topics in physics from biological perspective and discussion of physical processes associated with biological phenomena. Topics include statics, dynamics, work and energy, oscillations, hydrostatics, biological motion in fluids, waves, sounds, and physics of hearing. Letter grading. Mr. Schmidt (F)

1L. Physics for Bioengineers Laboratory I. (3)

(Formerly numbered 4L.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours; outside study, four hours. Corequisite: course 1 or Physics 1A. Introductory experimental physics laboratory course that explores basic physical concepts from biological perspective. Topics include basic measurement and analysis, static forces and torques, dynamic motion with damping, simple harmonic motion, fluid flow through free and constrained geometries, scale-dependent motion in fluids and Reynolds numbers, surface tension. Letter grading. Mr. Schmidt (F)

2. Physics for Bioengineers II. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course 1 or Physics 1A, Mathematics 31A. Corequisite: Mathematics 31B. Introduction to physics and biophysics. Basic topics in physics from biological perspective and discussion of physical processes associated with biological phenomena. Topics include kinetic theory of gases, statistical mechanics, diffusion, thermodynamics, physics of biopolymers and biomembranes, electric and magnetic fields, electricity in aqueous media. Letter grading. Mr. Schmidt (W)

2L. Physics for Bioengineers Laboratory II. (3)

(Formerly numbered 5L.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours; outside study, four hours. Requisite: course 1L or Physics 4AL. Corequisite: course 2 or Physics 1B. Continuation of course 1L. Second introductory experimental physics laboratory course that explores basic physical concepts from biological perspective. Topics include behavior of ideal gases, thermal transport, electric fields, electricity in aqueous media, simple electric circuits of resistors, inductors, and capacitors, electric circuit analogs in biological systems, optics of microscope, physics of light gun eration and absorption, fluorescence, laser in biology. Letter grading. Mr. Schmidt (W)

3. Physics for Bioengineers III. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course 2 or Physics 1B, Mathematics 31B. Corequisite: Mathematics 32A. Introduction to physics and biophysics. Basic topics in physics from biological perspective and discussion of physical processes associated with biological phenomena. Topics include DC and AC circuits, ion channels, biological circuits, Maxwell equations, electromagnetic waves, interference and diffraction, geometric optics, optics of eye and compound microscope, quantum physics, NMR and MRI, fluorescence. Letter grading. Mr. Schmidt (Sp)

3L. Physics for Bioengineers Laboratory III. (3)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours; outside study, four hours. Requisites: course 2 or Physics 1B, Mathematics 31B. Corequisites: course 3 or Electrical Engineering 1 or Physics 1C, Mathematics 32A. Continuation of course 2L. Third introductory experimental physics laboratory course that explores basic physical concepts from biological perspective. Topics include resistors, capacitors, and inductors, passive DC and AC circuits, active circuits, electric circuit analogs in biological systems, optics of lens and eye, compound microscope, physics of light generation and absorption, fluorescence. Letter grading. Mr. Schmidt (Sp)

10. Introduction to Bioengineering. (2)

Lecture, two hours; outside study, four hours. Preparation: high school biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics. Introduction to scientific and technological bases for established and emerging subfields of bioengineering, including biosensors, bioinstrumentation, and biosignal processing, biomechanics, biomaterials, tissue engineering, biotechnology, biological imaging, biomedical optics and lasers, neuroengineering, and biomolecular machines. Letter grading. Mr. Deming (F)

19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars. (1)

Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

99. Student Research Program. (1 to 2)

Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

Upper Division Courses

100. Bioengineering Fundamentals. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites or corequisites: course 3 or Electrical Engineering 1 or Physics 1C, Chemistry 14C or 30A, and Mathematics 32B. Fundamental basis for analysis and design of biological and biomedical devices and systems. Classical and statistical thermodynamic analysis of biological systems. Material, energy, charge, and force balances. Introduction to network analysis. Letter grading. Mr. Kamei (W)

110. Biotransport and Bioreaction Processes. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course 100, Mathematics 33B, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 20. Corequisite: Chemical Engineering 101A. Introduction to analysis of fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, binding events, and biochemical reactions in systems of interest to bioengineers, including cells, tissues, organs, human body, extracorporeal devices, tissue engineering systems, and bioartificial organs. Introduction to pharmacokinetic analysis. Letter grading. Mr. Kamei (Sp)

120. Biomedical Transducers. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course 3 or Electrical Engineering 1 or Physics 1C, Chemistry 14C or 30A, Mathematics 32B. Principles of transduction, design characteristics for different measurements, reliability and performance characteristics, and data processing and recording. Emphasis on silicon-based microfabricated and nanofabricated sensors. Novel materials, biocompatibility, biostability. Safety of electronic interfaces. Actuator design and interfacing control. Letter grading. Mr. Grundfest, Mr. Schmidt (W)

165. Bioethics and Regulatory Policies in Bioengineering. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, three hours; outside study, five hours. Increasing pace of biotechnological development requires intensive preparation for young scientists (i.e., graduate students, postdoctoral research fellows, and junior faculty) on issues in bioethics and regulatory policy. Examination of role of scientists in participating in, supporting, or opposing establishment of regulatory frameworks, relationship between scientists and socioeconomic movements by general public and individuals, and discussion of role of scientists in public arena, academic institutions, media, and industry. May be appropriate for students who already have some knowledge and/or experience in molecular biology, genetics, or biotechnology. Letter grading. Mr. Wu (W)

176. Principles of Biocompatibility. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: course 3 or Electrical Engineering 1 or Physics 1C, Chemistry 153A, Mathematics 33B. Biocompatibility at systemic, tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. Biomechanical compatibility, stress/strain constitutive equations, cellular and molecular response to mechanical signals, biochemical and cellular compatibility, immune response. Letter grading. Mr. Wu (F)

180. System Integration in Biology, Engineering, and Medicine I. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 3L (or Physics 4BL), 100, 110, 120, Life Sciences 3. Corequisite: course 180L. Part I of two-part series. Molecular basis of normal physiology and pathophysiology, and engineering design principles of cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. Fundamental engineering principles of selected medical therapeutic devices. Letter grading. Mr. Dunn, Mr. Wu (F)

180L. System Integration in Biology, Engineering, and Medicine I Laboratory. (3)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours; clinical visits, three hours; outside study, one hour. Corequisite: course 180. Hands-on experimentation and clinical applications of selected medical therapeutic devices associated with cardiovascular and pulmonary disorders. Letter grading. Mr. Dunn, Mr. Wu (F)

181. System Integration in Biology, Engineering, and Medicine II. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 180L. Corequisite: course 181L. Part II of two-part series. Molecular basis of normal physiology and pathophysiology of selected organ systems; engineering design principles of digestive and urinary systems. Fundamental engineering principles of selected medical therapeutic devices. Letter grading. Mr. Dunn, Mr. Wu (W)

181L. System Integration in Biology, Engineering, and Medicine II Laboratory. (3)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours; clinical visits, three hours; outside study, one hour. Corequisite: course 181. Hands-on experimentation and clinical applications of molecular basis of normal physiology and pathophysiology of selected organ systems; engineering design principles of digestive and urinary systems. Letter grading. Mr. Dunn, Mr. Wu (W)

182A-182B-182C. Bioengineering Capstone Design I, II, III. (4-4-4)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, six hours; outside study, four hours. Lectures, design seminars, and discussions with faculty advisory panel. Working in teams, students compete to develop innovative bioengineering solutions to meet specific set of design criteria (design and make strongest self-assembled biorobots or most stable UCLA logo or most selective and efficient biomarker sensors, etc.). Letter grading. 182A. Requisites: courses 3L (or Physics 4BL), 120. Development, writing, and oral defense of student design proposals. 182B. Requisite: course 182A. Exploration of different experimental and computational methods. Ordering of specific materials and software that are relevant to student projects. 182C. Requisite: course 182B. Construction of student designs, project updates, presentation of final projects in written and oral format, and team competition. Mr. Deming (F,W,Sp)

188. Special Courses in Bioengineering. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Special topics in bioengineering for undergraduate students that are taught on experimental or temporary basis, such as those taught by resident and visiting faculty members. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.

194. Research Group Seminars: Bioengineering. (4)

Seminar, three hours. Limited to bioengineering undergraduate students who are part of research group. Study and analysis of current topics in bioengineering. Discussion of current research literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. Student presentation of projects in research specialty. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

199. Directed Research in Bioengineering. (2 to 8)

Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be repeated for credit with school approval. Individual contract required; enrollment petitions available in Office of Academic and Student Affairs. Letter grading. (F,W,Sp)